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Libro de cuentos para ninos, la selva es el escenario y personaje omnipresente. La selva misionera, con su violencia natural incontenible, frente al hombre, aliado a veces, destructor las más, de esa naturaleza salvaje. Y en medio, la fauna: desde la gigantesca serpiente que declara la guerra al hombre, hasta el indefenso cachorro muerto equivocadamente por la mano de su propio amo.
Humor y tragedia se combinan eficazmente en estos cuentos, dando como resultado ejemplos antológicos de ese difícil arte que es el cuento, en el que Quiroga se reveló auténtico maestro.

Published: Booklassic an imprint of PublishDrive on
ISBN: 9789635269976
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I put of reading this book for so long, I had begun to believe I had actually read it! It is quite biting in it's satire and very funny, but there are parts where it gets tedious.more
I put of reading this book for so long, I had begun to believe I had actually read it! It is quite biting in it's satire and very funny, but there are parts where it gets tedious.more
I put of reading this book for so long, I had begun to believe I had actually read it! It is quite biting in it's satire and very funny, but there are parts where it gets tedious.more
Pretty good stuff. Book 3 isn't as great, and book 4 gets a little preachy at times, but fun to read. Makes me wonder about Yahoo's decision to name themselves after it; Yahoos represent a pretty cynical, misanthropic view of humanity.more
Pretty good stuff. Book 3 isn't as great, and book 4 gets a little preachy at times, but fun to read. Makes me wonder about Yahoo's decision to name themselves after it; Yahoos represent a pretty cynical, misanthropic view of humanity.more
Pretty good stuff. Book 3 isn't as great, and book 4 gets a little preachy at times, but fun to read. Makes me wonder about Yahoo's decision to name themselves after it; Yahoos represent a pretty cynical, misanthropic view of humanity.more
This is a fantastical satire that uses the ancient method of a journey (in this case multiple journeys) to foreign lands in the service of social satire and cultural commentary. The motivating force behind Gulliver's Travels is the author's apparent disgust with human folly and pretension; the ideas are embodied in grotesques and fantastic creatures, in the six-inch high Lilliputians, the gigantic Brobdingnagians, the horse-like Houyhnhnms and the disgusting Yahoos. These characters are so memorable that their names have become part of our culture. The journeys provide lessons for Lemuel Gulliver who is an honest if gullible narrator. Whether he learned the right lessons or ones that have value for others is for each reader to decided. However, concluding, he confesses that he could be reconciled to the English Yahoos "if they would be content with those Vices and Follies only which Nature hath entitled them to. I am not in the least provoked at the sight of a Lawyer, a Pick-pocket, a Colonel, a Fool, a Lord, a Gamster, a Politician, a Whoremunger, a Physician, . . . or the like: This is all according to the due Course of Things: but, when I behold a Lump of Deformity, and Diseases both in Body and Mind, smitten with Pride, it immediately breaks all the Measures of my patience."more
This is a fantastical satire that uses the ancient method of a journey (in this case multiple journeys) to foreign lands in the service of social satire and cultural commentary. The motivating force behind Gulliver's Travels is the author's apparent disgust with human folly and pretension; the ideas are embodied in grotesques and fantastic creatures, in the six-inch high Lilliputians, the gigantic Brobdingnagians, the horse-like Houyhnhnms and the disgusting Yahoos. These characters are so memorable that their names have become part of our culture. The journeys provide lessons for Lemuel Gulliver who is an honest if gullible narrator. Whether he learned the right lessons or ones that have value for others is for each reader to decided. However, concluding, he confesses that he could be reconciled to the English Yahoos "if they would be content with those Vices and Follies only which Nature hath entitled them to. I am not in the least provoked at the sight of a Lawyer, a Pick-pocket, a Colonel, a Fool, a Lord, a Gamster, a Politician, a Whoremunger, a Physician, . . . or the like: This is all according to the due Course of Things: but, when I behold a Lump of Deformity, and Diseases both in Body and Mind, smitten with Pride, it immediately breaks all the Measures of my patience."more
This is a fantastical satire that uses the ancient method of a journey (in this case multiple journeys) to foreign lands in the service of social satire and cultural commentary. The motivating force behind Gulliver's Travels is the author's apparent disgust with human folly and pretension; the ideas are embodied in grotesques and fantastic creatures, in the six-inch high Lilliputians, the gigantic Brobdingnagians, the horse-like Houyhnhnms and the disgusting Yahoos. These characters are so memorable that their names have become part of our culture. The journeys provide lessons for Lemuel Gulliver who is an honest if gullible narrator. Whether he learned the right lessons or ones that have value for others is for each reader to decided. However, concluding, he confesses that he could be reconciled to the English Yahoos "if they would be content with those Vices and Follies only which Nature hath entitled them to. I am not in the least provoked at the sight of a Lawyer, a Pick-pocket, a Colonel, a Fool, a Lord, a Gamster, a Politician, a Whoremunger, a Physician, . . . or the like: This is all according to the due Course of Things: but, when I behold a Lump of Deformity, and Diseases both in Body and Mind, smitten with Pride, it immediately breaks all the Measures of my patience."more
Most people have seen a cinematic version of this book, right? Most already know the story without actually bothering with reading the book? The book was written nearly 300 years old so some of the little of the language will be a little archaic but it's only a kids book so will be an easy read. Given the age of the story it will have very little relevance with events of today.Well at least that is what I thought beforehand. How very wrong I was!For those of you who do not know the story Gulliver basically visits four islands, one populated by a lot of little people, the next by some giants, then moving on to a flying island before finally landing on one ruled by horses where humens are the savages, something akin to the films Planet of the Apes but with horses rather than chimpanzees. Firstly the title is something of a misnomer. Rather than describing happenings in far off fanciful lands Swift is really only interested in taking a satirical swipe at events and in particular the politics an awful lot closer to home,namely London. Swift's family was originally from England but had backed the losing side in the English Civil War whereupon having lost their lands there were forced to take up residence Ireland. Swift was born and educated in Dublin but moved from his birthplace to London as a young man and there he became very active in the politics of the day,firstly as a Whig sympathiser then as a Tory. However, when the hoped for preferments failed to materialize Swift was virtually exiled back to Ireland making him rather bitter towards the political elite back in London.Some of the satire is fairly obvious, liking peeing on the palace in Lilliput to extinguish a fire there (in fact bodily functions seem to play a large part of the first two sections) but some other referances were I admit quite lost on me. Rather than travel broadening the mind it seemed to make Gulliver's more inward looking, so much so in the end he cannot bear the sight or touch of fellow humans, and this is probably where the book lost me as a fan. Personally I found the part on Laputa rather dull and very long-winded which was followed by the stay with the Houyhnhms which felt merely like the ramblings of a very bitter and disappointed in life man.On the whole I found the book interesting but ultimately a little disappointing and I certainy enjoyed Lilliput the most.more
Most people have seen a cinematic version of this book, right? Most already know the story without actually bothering with reading the book? The book was written nearly 300 years old so some of the little of the language will be a little archaic but it's only a kids book so will be an easy read. Given the age of the story it will have very little relevance with events of today.Well at least that is what I thought beforehand. How very wrong I was!For those of you who do not know the story Gulliver basically visits four islands, one populated by a lot of little people, the next by some giants, then moving on to a flying island before finally landing on one ruled by horses where humens are the savages, something akin to the films Planet of the Apes but with horses rather than chimpanzees. Firstly the title is something of a misnomer. Rather than describing happenings in far off fanciful lands Swift is really only interested in taking a satirical swipe at events and in particular the politics an awful lot closer to home,namely London. Swift's family was originally from England but had backed the losing side in the English Civil War whereupon having lost their lands there were forced to take up residence Ireland. Swift was born and educated in Dublin but moved from his birthplace to London as a young man and there he became very active in the politics of the day,firstly as a Whig sympathiser then as a Tory. However, when the hoped for preferments failed to materialize Swift was virtually exiled back to Ireland making him rather bitter towards the political elite back in London.Some of the satire is fairly obvious, liking peeing on the palace in Lilliput to extinguish a fire there (in fact bodily functions seem to play a large part of the first two sections) but some other referances were I admit quite lost on me. Rather than travel broadening the mind it seemed to make Gulliver's more inward looking, so much so in the end he cannot bear the sight or touch of fellow humans, and this is probably where the book lost me as a fan. Personally I found the part on Laputa rather dull and very long-winded which was followed by the stay with the Houyhnhms which felt merely like the ramblings of a very bitter and disappointed in life man.On the whole I found the book interesting but ultimately a little disappointing and I certainy enjoyed Lilliput the most.more
Most people have seen a cinematic version of this book, right? Most already know the story without actually bothering with reading the book? The book was written nearly 300 years old so some of the little of the language will be a little archaic but it's only a kids book so will be an easy read. Given the age of the story it will have very little relevance with events of today.Well at least that is what I thought beforehand. How very wrong I was!For those of you who do not know the story Gulliver basically visits four islands, one populated by a lot of little people, the next by some giants, then moving on to a flying island before finally landing on one ruled by horses where humens are the savages, something akin to the films Planet of the Apes but with horses rather than chimpanzees. Firstly the title is something of a misnomer. Rather than describing happenings in far off fanciful lands Swift is really only interested in taking a satirical swipe at events and in particular the politics an awful lot closer to home,namely London. Swift's family was originally from England but had backed the losing side in the English Civil War whereupon having lost their lands there were forced to take up residence Ireland. Swift was born and educated in Dublin but moved from his birthplace to London as a young man and there he became very active in the politics of the day,firstly as a Whig sympathiser then as a Tory. However, when the hoped for preferments failed to materialize Swift was virtually exiled back to Ireland making him rather bitter towards the political elite back in London.Some of the satire is fairly obvious, liking peeing on the palace in Lilliput to extinguish a fire there (in fact bodily functions seem to play a large part of the first two sections) but some other referances were I admit quite lost on me. Rather than travel broadening the mind it seemed to make Gulliver's more inward looking, so much so in the end he cannot bear the sight or touch of fellow humans, and this is probably where the book lost me as a fan. Personally I found the part on Laputa rather dull and very long-winded which was followed by the stay with the Houyhnhms which felt merely like the ramblings of a very bitter and disappointed in life man.On the whole I found the book interesting but ultimately a little disappointing and I certainy enjoyed Lilliput the most.more
This nearly 300 year old classic deserves its reputation, but it is a novel of two halves. The first two books of the four, in which Gulliver visits respectively Lilliput (very small people) and Brobdingnag (giants) are very good, funny, adventurous, imaginative and bawdy and would be worth 5/5 by themselves. However, I found the latter two books when he visits the flying island of Laputa and other lands; then in the final book, the land of the Houyhnhnms (intelligent horses subjugating primates who resemble degraded humans) duller and a lot harder to get through. They contain a lot of quite clever satire on the human condition and on civic life in Europe, but are rather overegged and over long, with little plot so rather a slog. 2/5 for the latter half, so overall 3.5/5.more
This nearly 300 year old classic deserves its reputation, but it is a novel of two halves. The first two books of the four, in which Gulliver visits respectively Lilliput (very small people) and Brobdingnag (giants) are very good, funny, adventurous, imaginative and bawdy and would be worth 5/5 by themselves. However, I found the latter two books when he visits the flying island of Laputa and other lands; then in the final book, the land of the Houyhnhnms (intelligent horses subjugating primates who resemble degraded humans) duller and a lot harder to get through. They contain a lot of quite clever satire on the human condition and on civic life in Europe, but are rather overegged and over long, with little plot so rather a slog. 2/5 for the latter half, so overall 3.5/5.more
This nearly 300 year old classic deserves its reputation, but it is a novel of two halves. The first two books of the four, in which Gulliver visits respectively Lilliput (very small people) and Brobdingnag (giants) are very good, funny, adventurous, imaginative and bawdy and would be worth 5/5 by themselves. However, I found the latter two books when he visits the flying island of Laputa and other lands; then in the final book, the land of the Houyhnhnms (intelligent horses subjugating primates who resemble degraded humans) duller and a lot harder to get through. They contain a lot of quite clever satire on the human condition and on civic life in Europe, but are rather overegged and over long, with little plot so rather a slog. 2/5 for the latter half, so overall 3.5/5.more
For good reason, this is a must read classic. The book appeals on a superficial level with the author's exotic travels, and yet has a far deeper message about human nature and the society of the day.Prior reviewers (and Wikipedia) summarize its contents, so I will not do so again. However, my favorite section of the book is contained with chapter 4 regarding the land of Houyhnhnms (horses) and Yahoos (uncivilized humans). The author's sometimes graphic depiction of his homeland's princes, lawyers, doctors and military leaders is absolutely hilarious and thought provoking.more
For good reason, this is a must read classic. The book appeals on a superficial level with the author's exotic travels, and yet has a far deeper message about human nature and the society of the day.Prior reviewers (and Wikipedia) summarize its contents, so I will not do so again. However, my favorite section of the book is contained with chapter 4 regarding the land of Houyhnhnms (horses) and Yahoos (uncivilized humans). The author's sometimes graphic depiction of his homeland's princes, lawyers, doctors and military leaders is absolutely hilarious and thought provoking.more
For good reason, this is a must read classic. The book appeals on a superficial level with the author's exotic travels, and yet has a far deeper message about human nature and the society of the day.Prior reviewers (and Wikipedia) summarize its contents, so I will not do so again. However, my favorite section of the book is contained with chapter 4 regarding the land of Houyhnhnms (horses) and Yahoos (uncivilized humans). The author's sometimes graphic depiction of his homeland's princes, lawyers, doctors and military leaders is absolutely hilarious and thought provoking.more
No wonder this novel is considered a classic which has been enjoyed "in the nursery" and in the library! Jonathan Swift wrote a story in the 1700s which is absolutely timeless. On one level this is a delightful fantasy romp to imagined lands with amazing inhabitants. However, do not be deceived. This is a philosophical treatise written with tremendous wit and a profound message about the author's desire for truth, indeed his bottomless pit of want for truth. The author levels his satiric wit at the following topics and fires away: religion, travel tales, politics, sex, relationships, colonialism, capitalism, prejudice, social superficiality, prejudice, stereotypes and more. Anyone who has traveled to a culture which is vastly different from their own and reveled in the experience will likely appreciate this book, and those who have not but harbor strong opinions about those folks from another culture......well, it should be required reading! Go ahead, read it and laugh out loud, smile, wince, cringe, and love it!more
No wonder this novel is considered a classic which has been enjoyed "in the nursery" and in the library! Jonathan Swift wrote a story in the 1700s which is absolutely timeless. On one level this is a delightful fantasy romp to imagined lands with amazing inhabitants. However, do not be deceived. This is a philosophical treatise written with tremendous wit and a profound message about the author's desire for truth, indeed his bottomless pit of want for truth. The author levels his satiric wit at the following topics and fires away: religion, travel tales, politics, sex, relationships, colonialism, capitalism, prejudice, social superficiality, prejudice, stereotypes and more. Anyone who has traveled to a culture which is vastly different from their own and reveled in the experience will likely appreciate this book, and those who have not but harbor strong opinions about those folks from another culture......well, it should be required reading! Go ahead, read it and laugh out loud, smile, wince, cringe, and love it!more
No wonder this novel is considered a classic which has been enjoyed "in the nursery" and in the library! Jonathan Swift wrote a story in the 1700s which is absolutely timeless. On one level this is a delightful fantasy romp to imagined lands with amazing inhabitants. However, do not be deceived. This is a philosophical treatise written with tremendous wit and a profound message about the author's desire for truth, indeed his bottomless pit of want for truth. The author levels his satiric wit at the following topics and fires away: religion, travel tales, politics, sex, relationships, colonialism, capitalism, prejudice, social superficiality, prejudice, stereotypes and more. Anyone who has traveled to a culture which is vastly different from their own and reveled in the experience will likely appreciate this book, and those who have not but harbor strong opinions about those folks from another culture......well, it should be required reading! Go ahead, read it and laugh out loud, smile, wince, cringe, and love it!more
As I was on the road, observing the littleness of the houses, the trees, the cattle, and the people, I began to think myself in Lilliput. I was afraid of trampling on every traveller I met, and often called aloud to have them stand out of the way, so that I had like to have gotten one or two broken heads for my impertinence.(Gulliver on his return to England from Brobdingnag) The introduction by Gulliver's cousin is followed by a letter from Gulliver which makes him sound completely insane and obsessed by horses, and I started to doubt whether the journeys were a figment of his imagination. Gulliver becomes more and more neurotic each time he returns home, in marked contrast to how he copes with what should be far more stressful events while travelling. He takes shipwreck, mutiny and capture in his stride, and quickly becomes fluent in unknown languages, yet after his final journey he is unable to face talking to or touching his wife and children, and spends four hours a day or more in the stables talking to his horses.I don't think you have to have detailed knowledge of early 18th century history to get the satire. Religious quarrels, politicians, lawyers and egg-head scientists are good targets for satire in all ages. the stories have plenty of amusing moments, such as the Lilliputian queen's horror at Gulliver's method of extinguishing a fire in the palace, and her refusal ever to occupy that part of the building again, no matter how thoroughly they were cleaned. However, when I came across this description of Lilliputian handwriting, it made me wonder whether it was a satirical dig at something I hand;t picked up on or if the author had just put it in to tease a particular English lady who had trouble writing in a straight line: I shall say but little at present of their learning, which, for many ages, has flourished in all its branches among them: but their manner of writing is very peculiar, being neither from the left to the right, like the Europeans, nor from the right to the left, like the Arabians, nor from up to down, like the Chinese, but aslant, from one corner of the paper to the other, like ladies in England.more
As I was on the road, observing the littleness of the houses, the trees, the cattle, and the people, I began to think myself in Lilliput. I was afraid of trampling on every traveller I met, and often called aloud to have them stand out of the way, so that I had like to have gotten one or two broken heads for my impertinence.(Gulliver on his return to England from Brobdingnag) The introduction by Gulliver's cousin is followed by a letter from Gulliver which makes him sound completely insane and obsessed by horses, and I started to doubt whether the journeys were a figment of his imagination. Gulliver becomes more and more neurotic each time he returns home, in marked contrast to how he copes with what should be far more stressful events while travelling. He takes shipwreck, mutiny and capture in his stride, and quickly becomes fluent in unknown languages, yet after his final journey he is unable to face talking to or touching his wife and children, and spends four hours a day or more in the stables talking to his horses.I don't think you have to have detailed knowledge of early 18th century history to get the satire. Religious quarrels, politicians, lawyers and egg-head scientists are good targets for satire in all ages. the stories have plenty of amusing moments, such as the Lilliputian queen's horror at Gulliver's method of extinguishing a fire in the palace, and her refusal ever to occupy that part of the building again, no matter how thoroughly they were cleaned. However, when I came across this description of Lilliputian handwriting, it made me wonder whether it was a satirical dig at something I hand;t picked up on or if the author had just put it in to tease a particular English lady who had trouble writing in a straight line: I shall say but little at present of their learning, which, for many ages, has flourished in all its branches among them: but their manner of writing is very peculiar, being neither from the left to the right, like the Europeans, nor from the right to the left, like the Arabians, nor from up to down, like the Chinese, but aslant, from one corner of the paper to the other, like ladies in England.more
As I was on the road, observing the littleness of the houses, the trees, the cattle, and the people, I began to think myself in Lilliput. I was afraid of trampling on every traveller I met, and often called aloud to have them stand out of the way, so that I had like to have gotten one or two broken heads for my impertinence.(Gulliver on his return to England from Brobdingnag) The introduction by Gulliver's cousin is followed by a letter from Gulliver which makes him sound completely insane and obsessed by horses, and I started to doubt whether the journeys were a figment of his imagination. Gulliver becomes more and more neurotic each time he returns home, in marked contrast to how he copes with what should be far more stressful events while travelling. He takes shipwreck, mutiny and capture in his stride, and quickly becomes fluent in unknown languages, yet after his final journey he is unable to face talking to or touching his wife and children, and spends four hours a day or more in the stables talking to his horses.I don't think you have to have detailed knowledge of early 18th century history to get the satire. Religious quarrels, politicians, lawyers and egg-head scientists are good targets for satire in all ages. the stories have plenty of amusing moments, such as the Lilliputian queen's horror at Gulliver's method of extinguishing a fire in the palace, and her refusal ever to occupy that part of the building again, no matter how thoroughly they were cleaned. However, when I came across this description of Lilliputian handwriting, it made me wonder whether it was a satirical dig at something I hand;t picked up on or if the author had just put it in to tease a particular English lady who had trouble writing in a straight line: I shall say but little at present of their learning, which, for many ages, has flourished in all its branches among them: but their manner of writing is very peculiar, being neither from the left to the right, like the Europeans, nor from the right to the left, like the Arabians, nor from up to down, like the Chinese, but aslant, from one corner of the paper to the other, like ladies in England.more
Gulliver's Travels has some amusing and even a few insightful bits, but Swift was no Voltaire. A satire not so much on some particular human follies as on man as such, this book is basically a monument to misanthropy---as is made painfully clear in the heavy-handed fourth part. Not that satire has to be subtle, but it should at least be accurate, at most an exaggeration of the truth rather than a projection of one's own bitter prejudices. Swift's portrayal of human society, even as imperfect as it was (and even more so in his time than now), is at best one-sided. It ends with the narrator repulsed by the smell of his wife, and disgusted with himself for ever having couple with her and brought children into the world. If you can sympathize with that sentiment, then you might find Swift's satire to be penetrating and clever. If, on the other hand, you see any value in human life and hold it to be more important than the vice and suffering that necessarily characterize some part of it, then you might be better off reading something else.more
Gulliver's Travels has some amusing and even a few insightful bits, but Swift was no Voltaire. A satire not so much on some particular human follies as on man as such, this book is basically a monument to misanthropy---as is made painfully clear in the heavy-handed fourth part. Not that satire has to be subtle, but it should at least be accurate, at most an exaggeration of the truth rather than a projection of one's own bitter prejudices. Swift's portrayal of human society, even as imperfect as it was (and even more so in his time than now), is at best one-sided. It ends with the narrator repulsed by the smell of his wife, and disgusted with himself for ever having couple with her and brought children into the world. If you can sympathize with that sentiment, then you might find Swift's satire to be penetrating and clever. If, on the other hand, you see any value in human life and hold it to be more important than the vice and suffering that necessarily characterize some part of it, then you might be better off reading something else.more
Gulliver's Travels has some amusing and even a few insightful bits, but Swift was no Voltaire. A satire not so much on some particular human follies as on man as such, this book is basically a monument to misanthropy---as is made painfully clear in the heavy-handed fourth part. Not that satire has to be subtle, but it should at least be accurate, at most an exaggeration of the truth rather than a projection of one's own bitter prejudices. Swift's portrayal of human society, even as imperfect as it was (and even more so in his time than now), is at best one-sided. It ends with the narrator repulsed by the smell of his wife, and disgusted with himself for ever having couple with her and brought children into the world. If you can sympathize with that sentiment, then you might find Swift's satire to be penetrating and clever. If, on the other hand, you see any value in human life and hold it to be more important than the vice and suffering that necessarily characterize some part of it, then you might be better off reading something else.more
I read this book finally, upto the last page, as a part of a very interesting course on 18th C literature, and I loved the insights into Swift's work the course gave me. Specially amusing was my professor's fascination with the 'scatological fixation' that Swift shows in this work. :Dmore
I read this book finally, upto the last page, as a part of a very interesting course on 18th C literature, and I loved the insights into Swift's work the course gave me. Specially amusing was my professor's fascination with the 'scatological fixation' that Swift shows in this work. :Dmore
I read this book finally, upto the last page, as a part of a very interesting course on 18th C literature, and I loved the insights into Swift's work the course gave me. Specially amusing was my professor's fascination with the 'scatological fixation' that Swift shows in this work. :Dmore
Read all 173 reviews

Reviews

I put of reading this book for so long, I had begun to believe I had actually read it! It is quite biting in it's satire and very funny, but there are parts where it gets tedious.more
I put of reading this book for so long, I had begun to believe I had actually read it! It is quite biting in it's satire and very funny, but there are parts where it gets tedious.more
I put of reading this book for so long, I had begun to believe I had actually read it! It is quite biting in it's satire and very funny, but there are parts where it gets tedious.more
Pretty good stuff. Book 3 isn't as great, and book 4 gets a little preachy at times, but fun to read. Makes me wonder about Yahoo's decision to name themselves after it; Yahoos represent a pretty cynical, misanthropic view of humanity.more
Pretty good stuff. Book 3 isn't as great, and book 4 gets a little preachy at times, but fun to read. Makes me wonder about Yahoo's decision to name themselves after it; Yahoos represent a pretty cynical, misanthropic view of humanity.more
Pretty good stuff. Book 3 isn't as great, and book 4 gets a little preachy at times, but fun to read. Makes me wonder about Yahoo's decision to name themselves after it; Yahoos represent a pretty cynical, misanthropic view of humanity.more
This is a fantastical satire that uses the ancient method of a journey (in this case multiple journeys) to foreign lands in the service of social satire and cultural commentary. The motivating force behind Gulliver's Travels is the author's apparent disgust with human folly and pretension; the ideas are embodied in grotesques and fantastic creatures, in the six-inch high Lilliputians, the gigantic Brobdingnagians, the horse-like Houyhnhnms and the disgusting Yahoos. These characters are so memorable that their names have become part of our culture. The journeys provide lessons for Lemuel Gulliver who is an honest if gullible narrator. Whether he learned the right lessons or ones that have value for others is for each reader to decided. However, concluding, he confesses that he could be reconciled to the English Yahoos "if they would be content with those Vices and Follies only which Nature hath entitled them to. I am not in the least provoked at the sight of a Lawyer, a Pick-pocket, a Colonel, a Fool, a Lord, a Gamster, a Politician, a Whoremunger, a Physician, . . . or the like: This is all according to the due Course of Things: but, when I behold a Lump of Deformity, and Diseases both in Body and Mind, smitten with Pride, it immediately breaks all the Measures of my patience."more
This is a fantastical satire that uses the ancient method of a journey (in this case multiple journeys) to foreign lands in the service of social satire and cultural commentary. The motivating force behind Gulliver's Travels is the author's apparent disgust with human folly and pretension; the ideas are embodied in grotesques and fantastic creatures, in the six-inch high Lilliputians, the gigantic Brobdingnagians, the horse-like Houyhnhnms and the disgusting Yahoos. These characters are so memorable that their names have become part of our culture. The journeys provide lessons for Lemuel Gulliver who is an honest if gullible narrator. Whether he learned the right lessons or ones that have value for others is for each reader to decided. However, concluding, he confesses that he could be reconciled to the English Yahoos "if they would be content with those Vices and Follies only which Nature hath entitled them to. I am not in the least provoked at the sight of a Lawyer, a Pick-pocket, a Colonel, a Fool, a Lord, a Gamster, a Politician, a Whoremunger, a Physician, . . . or the like: This is all according to the due Course of Things: but, when I behold a Lump of Deformity, and Diseases both in Body and Mind, smitten with Pride, it immediately breaks all the Measures of my patience."more
This is a fantastical satire that uses the ancient method of a journey (in this case multiple journeys) to foreign lands in the service of social satire and cultural commentary. The motivating force behind Gulliver's Travels is the author's apparent disgust with human folly and pretension; the ideas are embodied in grotesques and fantastic creatures, in the six-inch high Lilliputians, the gigantic Brobdingnagians, the horse-like Houyhnhnms and the disgusting Yahoos. These characters are so memorable that their names have become part of our culture. The journeys provide lessons for Lemuel Gulliver who is an honest if gullible narrator. Whether he learned the right lessons or ones that have value for others is for each reader to decided. However, concluding, he confesses that he could be reconciled to the English Yahoos "if they would be content with those Vices and Follies only which Nature hath entitled them to. I am not in the least provoked at the sight of a Lawyer, a Pick-pocket, a Colonel, a Fool, a Lord, a Gamster, a Politician, a Whoremunger, a Physician, . . . or the like: This is all according to the due Course of Things: but, when I behold a Lump of Deformity, and Diseases both in Body and Mind, smitten with Pride, it immediately breaks all the Measures of my patience."more
Most people have seen a cinematic version of this book, right? Most already know the story without actually bothering with reading the book? The book was written nearly 300 years old so some of the little of the language will be a little archaic but it's only a kids book so will be an easy read. Given the age of the story it will have very little relevance with events of today.Well at least that is what I thought beforehand. How very wrong I was!For those of you who do not know the story Gulliver basically visits four islands, one populated by a lot of little people, the next by some giants, then moving on to a flying island before finally landing on one ruled by horses where humens are the savages, something akin to the films Planet of the Apes but with horses rather than chimpanzees. Firstly the title is something of a misnomer. Rather than describing happenings in far off fanciful lands Swift is really only interested in taking a satirical swipe at events and in particular the politics an awful lot closer to home,namely London. Swift's family was originally from England but had backed the losing side in the English Civil War whereupon having lost their lands there were forced to take up residence Ireland. Swift was born and educated in Dublin but moved from his birthplace to London as a young man and there he became very active in the politics of the day,firstly as a Whig sympathiser then as a Tory. However, when the hoped for preferments failed to materialize Swift was virtually exiled back to Ireland making him rather bitter towards the political elite back in London.Some of the satire is fairly obvious, liking peeing on the palace in Lilliput to extinguish a fire there (in fact bodily functions seem to play a large part of the first two sections) but some other referances were I admit quite lost on me. Rather than travel broadening the mind it seemed to make Gulliver's more inward looking, so much so in the end he cannot bear the sight or touch of fellow humans, and this is probably where the book lost me as a fan. Personally I found the part on Laputa rather dull and very long-winded which was followed by the stay with the Houyhnhms which felt merely like the ramblings of a very bitter and disappointed in life man.On the whole I found the book interesting but ultimately a little disappointing and I certainy enjoyed Lilliput the most.more
Most people have seen a cinematic version of this book, right? Most already know the story without actually bothering with reading the book? The book was written nearly 300 years old so some of the little of the language will be a little archaic but it's only a kids book so will be an easy read. Given the age of the story it will have very little relevance with events of today.Well at least that is what I thought beforehand. How very wrong I was!For those of you who do not know the story Gulliver basically visits four islands, one populated by a lot of little people, the next by some giants, then moving on to a flying island before finally landing on one ruled by horses where humens are the savages, something akin to the films Planet of the Apes but with horses rather than chimpanzees. Firstly the title is something of a misnomer. Rather than describing happenings in far off fanciful lands Swift is really only interested in taking a satirical swipe at events and in particular the politics an awful lot closer to home,namely London. Swift's family was originally from England but had backed the losing side in the English Civil War whereupon having lost their lands there were forced to take up residence Ireland. Swift was born and educated in Dublin but moved from his birthplace to London as a young man and there he became very active in the politics of the day,firstly as a Whig sympathiser then as a Tory. However, when the hoped for preferments failed to materialize Swift was virtually exiled back to Ireland making him rather bitter towards the political elite back in London.Some of the satire is fairly obvious, liking peeing on the palace in Lilliput to extinguish a fire there (in fact bodily functions seem to play a large part of the first two sections) but some other referances were I admit quite lost on me. Rather than travel broadening the mind it seemed to make Gulliver's more inward looking, so much so in the end he cannot bear the sight or touch of fellow humans, and this is probably where the book lost me as a fan. Personally I found the part on Laputa rather dull and very long-winded which was followed by the stay with the Houyhnhms which felt merely like the ramblings of a very bitter and disappointed in life man.On the whole I found the book interesting but ultimately a little disappointing and I certainy enjoyed Lilliput the most.more
Most people have seen a cinematic version of this book, right? Most already know the story without actually bothering with reading the book? The book was written nearly 300 years old so some of the little of the language will be a little archaic but it's only a kids book so will be an easy read. Given the age of the story it will have very little relevance with events of today.Well at least that is what I thought beforehand. How very wrong I was!For those of you who do not know the story Gulliver basically visits four islands, one populated by a lot of little people, the next by some giants, then moving on to a flying island before finally landing on one ruled by horses where humens are the savages, something akin to the films Planet of the Apes but with horses rather than chimpanzees. Firstly the title is something of a misnomer. Rather than describing happenings in far off fanciful lands Swift is really only interested in taking a satirical swipe at events and in particular the politics an awful lot closer to home,namely London. Swift's family was originally from England but had backed the losing side in the English Civil War whereupon having lost their lands there were forced to take up residence Ireland. Swift was born and educated in Dublin but moved from his birthplace to London as a young man and there he became very active in the politics of the day,firstly as a Whig sympathiser then as a Tory. However, when the hoped for preferments failed to materialize Swift was virtually exiled back to Ireland making him rather bitter towards the political elite back in London.Some of the satire is fairly obvious, liking peeing on the palace in Lilliput to extinguish a fire there (in fact bodily functions seem to play a large part of the first two sections) but some other referances were I admit quite lost on me. Rather than travel broadening the mind it seemed to make Gulliver's more inward looking, so much so in the end he cannot bear the sight or touch of fellow humans, and this is probably where the book lost me as a fan. Personally I found the part on Laputa rather dull and very long-winded which was followed by the stay with the Houyhnhms which felt merely like the ramblings of a very bitter and disappointed in life man.On the whole I found the book interesting but ultimately a little disappointing and I certainy enjoyed Lilliput the most.more
This nearly 300 year old classic deserves its reputation, but it is a novel of two halves. The first two books of the four, in which Gulliver visits respectively Lilliput (very small people) and Brobdingnag (giants) are very good, funny, adventurous, imaginative and bawdy and would be worth 5/5 by themselves. However, I found the latter two books when he visits the flying island of Laputa and other lands; then in the final book, the land of the Houyhnhnms (intelligent horses subjugating primates who resemble degraded humans) duller and a lot harder to get through. They contain a lot of quite clever satire on the human condition and on civic life in Europe, but are rather overegged and over long, with little plot so rather a slog. 2/5 for the latter half, so overall 3.5/5.more
This nearly 300 year old classic deserves its reputation, but it is a novel of two halves. The first two books of the four, in which Gulliver visits respectively Lilliput (very small people) and Brobdingnag (giants) are very good, funny, adventurous, imaginative and bawdy and would be worth 5/5 by themselves. However, I found the latter two books when he visits the flying island of Laputa and other lands; then in the final book, the land of the Houyhnhnms (intelligent horses subjugating primates who resemble degraded humans) duller and a lot harder to get through. They contain a lot of quite clever satire on the human condition and on civic life in Europe, but are rather overegged and over long, with little plot so rather a slog. 2/5 for the latter half, so overall 3.5/5.more
This nearly 300 year old classic deserves its reputation, but it is a novel of two halves. The first two books of the four, in which Gulliver visits respectively Lilliput (very small people) and Brobdingnag (giants) are very good, funny, adventurous, imaginative and bawdy and would be worth 5/5 by themselves. However, I found the latter two books when he visits the flying island of Laputa and other lands; then in the final book, the land of the Houyhnhnms (intelligent horses subjugating primates who resemble degraded humans) duller and a lot harder to get through. They contain a lot of quite clever satire on the human condition and on civic life in Europe, but are rather overegged and over long, with little plot so rather a slog. 2/5 for the latter half, so overall 3.5/5.more
For good reason, this is a must read classic. The book appeals on a superficial level with the author's exotic travels, and yet has a far deeper message about human nature and the society of the day.Prior reviewers (and Wikipedia) summarize its contents, so I will not do so again. However, my favorite section of the book is contained with chapter 4 regarding the land of Houyhnhnms (horses) and Yahoos (uncivilized humans). The author's sometimes graphic depiction of his homeland's princes, lawyers, doctors and military leaders is absolutely hilarious and thought provoking.more
For good reason, this is a must read classic. The book appeals on a superficial level with the author's exotic travels, and yet has a far deeper message about human nature and the society of the day.Prior reviewers (and Wikipedia) summarize its contents, so I will not do so again. However, my favorite section of the book is contained with chapter 4 regarding the land of Houyhnhnms (horses) and Yahoos (uncivilized humans). The author's sometimes graphic depiction of his homeland's princes, lawyers, doctors and military leaders is absolutely hilarious and thought provoking.more
For good reason, this is a must read classic. The book appeals on a superficial level with the author's exotic travels, and yet has a far deeper message about human nature and the society of the day.Prior reviewers (and Wikipedia) summarize its contents, so I will not do so again. However, my favorite section of the book is contained with chapter 4 regarding the land of Houyhnhnms (horses) and Yahoos (uncivilized humans). The author's sometimes graphic depiction of his homeland's princes, lawyers, doctors and military leaders is absolutely hilarious and thought provoking.more
No wonder this novel is considered a classic which has been enjoyed "in the nursery" and in the library! Jonathan Swift wrote a story in the 1700s which is absolutely timeless. On one level this is a delightful fantasy romp to imagined lands with amazing inhabitants. However, do not be deceived. This is a philosophical treatise written with tremendous wit and a profound message about the author's desire for truth, indeed his bottomless pit of want for truth. The author levels his satiric wit at the following topics and fires away: religion, travel tales, politics, sex, relationships, colonialism, capitalism, prejudice, social superficiality, prejudice, stereotypes and more. Anyone who has traveled to a culture which is vastly different from their own and reveled in the experience will likely appreciate this book, and those who have not but harbor strong opinions about those folks from another culture......well, it should be required reading! Go ahead, read it and laugh out loud, smile, wince, cringe, and love it!more
No wonder this novel is considered a classic which has been enjoyed "in the nursery" and in the library! Jonathan Swift wrote a story in the 1700s which is absolutely timeless. On one level this is a delightful fantasy romp to imagined lands with amazing inhabitants. However, do not be deceived. This is a philosophical treatise written with tremendous wit and a profound message about the author's desire for truth, indeed his bottomless pit of want for truth. The author levels his satiric wit at the following topics and fires away: religion, travel tales, politics, sex, relationships, colonialism, capitalism, prejudice, social superficiality, prejudice, stereotypes and more. Anyone who has traveled to a culture which is vastly different from their own and reveled in the experience will likely appreciate this book, and those who have not but harbor strong opinions about those folks from another culture......well, it should be required reading! Go ahead, read it and laugh out loud, smile, wince, cringe, and love it!more
No wonder this novel is considered a classic which has been enjoyed "in the nursery" and in the library! Jonathan Swift wrote a story in the 1700s which is absolutely timeless. On one level this is a delightful fantasy romp to imagined lands with amazing inhabitants. However, do not be deceived. This is a philosophical treatise written with tremendous wit and a profound message about the author's desire for truth, indeed his bottomless pit of want for truth. The author levels his satiric wit at the following topics and fires away: religion, travel tales, politics, sex, relationships, colonialism, capitalism, prejudice, social superficiality, prejudice, stereotypes and more. Anyone who has traveled to a culture which is vastly different from their own and reveled in the experience will likely appreciate this book, and those who have not but harbor strong opinions about those folks from another culture......well, it should be required reading! Go ahead, read it and laugh out loud, smile, wince, cringe, and love it!more
As I was on the road, observing the littleness of the houses, the trees, the cattle, and the people, I began to think myself in Lilliput. I was afraid of trampling on every traveller I met, and often called aloud to have them stand out of the way, so that I had like to have gotten one or two broken heads for my impertinence.(Gulliver on his return to England from Brobdingnag) The introduction by Gulliver's cousin is followed by a letter from Gulliver which makes him sound completely insane and obsessed by horses, and I started to doubt whether the journeys were a figment of his imagination. Gulliver becomes more and more neurotic each time he returns home, in marked contrast to how he copes with what should be far more stressful events while travelling. He takes shipwreck, mutiny and capture in his stride, and quickly becomes fluent in unknown languages, yet after his final journey he is unable to face talking to or touching his wife and children, and spends four hours a day or more in the stables talking to his horses.I don't think you have to have detailed knowledge of early 18th century history to get the satire. Religious quarrels, politicians, lawyers and egg-head scientists are good targets for satire in all ages. the stories have plenty of amusing moments, such as the Lilliputian queen's horror at Gulliver's method of extinguishing a fire in the palace, and her refusal ever to occupy that part of the building again, no matter how thoroughly they were cleaned. However, when I came across this description of Lilliputian handwriting, it made me wonder whether it was a satirical dig at something I hand;t picked up on or if the author had just put it in to tease a particular English lady who had trouble writing in a straight line: I shall say but little at present of their learning, which, for many ages, has flourished in all its branches among them: but their manner of writing is very peculiar, being neither from the left to the right, like the Europeans, nor from the right to the left, like the Arabians, nor from up to down, like the Chinese, but aslant, from one corner of the paper to the other, like ladies in England.more
As I was on the road, observing the littleness of the houses, the trees, the cattle, and the people, I began to think myself in Lilliput. I was afraid of trampling on every traveller I met, and often called aloud to have them stand out of the way, so that I had like to have gotten one or two broken heads for my impertinence.(Gulliver on his return to England from Brobdingnag) The introduction by Gulliver's cousin is followed by a letter from Gulliver which makes him sound completely insane and obsessed by horses, and I started to doubt whether the journeys were a figment of his imagination. Gulliver becomes more and more neurotic each time he returns home, in marked contrast to how he copes with what should be far more stressful events while travelling. He takes shipwreck, mutiny and capture in his stride, and quickly becomes fluent in unknown languages, yet after his final journey he is unable to face talking to or touching his wife and children, and spends four hours a day or more in the stables talking to his horses.I don't think you have to have detailed knowledge of early 18th century history to get the satire. Religious quarrels, politicians, lawyers and egg-head scientists are good targets for satire in all ages. the stories have plenty of amusing moments, such as the Lilliputian queen's horror at Gulliver's method of extinguishing a fire in the palace, and her refusal ever to occupy that part of the building again, no matter how thoroughly they were cleaned. However, when I came across this description of Lilliputian handwriting, it made me wonder whether it was a satirical dig at something I hand;t picked up on or if the author had just put it in to tease a particular English lady who had trouble writing in a straight line: I shall say but little at present of their learning, which, for many ages, has flourished in all its branches among them: but their manner of writing is very peculiar, being neither from the left to the right, like the Europeans, nor from the right to the left, like the Arabians, nor from up to down, like the Chinese, but aslant, from one corner of the paper to the other, like ladies in England.more
As I was on the road, observing the littleness of the houses, the trees, the cattle, and the people, I began to think myself in Lilliput. I was afraid of trampling on every traveller I met, and often called aloud to have them stand out of the way, so that I had like to have gotten one or two broken heads for my impertinence.(Gulliver on his return to England from Brobdingnag) The introduction by Gulliver's cousin is followed by a letter from Gulliver which makes him sound completely insane and obsessed by horses, and I started to doubt whether the journeys were a figment of his imagination. Gulliver becomes more and more neurotic each time he returns home, in marked contrast to how he copes with what should be far more stressful events while travelling. He takes shipwreck, mutiny and capture in his stride, and quickly becomes fluent in unknown languages, yet after his final journey he is unable to face talking to or touching his wife and children, and spends four hours a day or more in the stables talking to his horses.I don't think you have to have detailed knowledge of early 18th century history to get the satire. Religious quarrels, politicians, lawyers and egg-head scientists are good targets for satire in all ages. the stories have plenty of amusing moments, such as the Lilliputian queen's horror at Gulliver's method of extinguishing a fire in the palace, and her refusal ever to occupy that part of the building again, no matter how thoroughly they were cleaned. However, when I came across this description of Lilliputian handwriting, it made me wonder whether it was a satirical dig at something I hand;t picked up on or if the author had just put it in to tease a particular English lady who had trouble writing in a straight line: I shall say but little at present of their learning, which, for many ages, has flourished in all its branches among them: but their manner of writing is very peculiar, being neither from the left to the right, like the Europeans, nor from the right to the left, like the Arabians, nor from up to down, like the Chinese, but aslant, from one corner of the paper to the other, like ladies in England.more
Gulliver's Travels has some amusing and even a few insightful bits, but Swift was no Voltaire. A satire not so much on some particular human follies as on man as such, this book is basically a monument to misanthropy---as is made painfully clear in the heavy-handed fourth part. Not that satire has to be subtle, but it should at least be accurate, at most an exaggeration of the truth rather than a projection of one's own bitter prejudices. Swift's portrayal of human society, even as imperfect as it was (and even more so in his time than now), is at best one-sided. It ends with the narrator repulsed by the smell of his wife, and disgusted with himself for ever having couple with her and brought children into the world. If you can sympathize with that sentiment, then you might find Swift's satire to be penetrating and clever. If, on the other hand, you see any value in human life and hold it to be more important than the vice and suffering that necessarily characterize some part of it, then you might be better off reading something else.more
Gulliver's Travels has some amusing and even a few insightful bits, but Swift was no Voltaire. A satire not so much on some particular human follies as on man as such, this book is basically a monument to misanthropy---as is made painfully clear in the heavy-handed fourth part. Not that satire has to be subtle, but it should at least be accurate, at most an exaggeration of the truth rather than a projection of one's own bitter prejudices. Swift's portrayal of human society, even as imperfect as it was (and even more so in his time than now), is at best one-sided. It ends with the narrator repulsed by the smell of his wife, and disgusted with himself for ever having couple with her and brought children into the world. If you can sympathize with that sentiment, then you might find Swift's satire to be penetrating and clever. If, on the other hand, you see any value in human life and hold it to be more important than the vice and suffering that necessarily characterize some part of it, then you might be better off reading something else.more
Gulliver's Travels has some amusing and even a few insightful bits, but Swift was no Voltaire. A satire not so much on some particular human follies as on man as such, this book is basically a monument to misanthropy---as is made painfully clear in the heavy-handed fourth part. Not that satire has to be subtle, but it should at least be accurate, at most an exaggeration of the truth rather than a projection of one's own bitter prejudices. Swift's portrayal of human society, even as imperfect as it was (and even more so in his time than now), is at best one-sided. It ends with the narrator repulsed by the smell of his wife, and disgusted with himself for ever having couple with her and brought children into the world. If you can sympathize with that sentiment, then you might find Swift's satire to be penetrating and clever. If, on the other hand, you see any value in human life and hold it to be more important than the vice and suffering that necessarily characterize some part of it, then you might be better off reading something else.more
I read this book finally, upto the last page, as a part of a very interesting course on 18th C literature, and I loved the insights into Swift's work the course gave me. Specially amusing was my professor's fascination with the 'scatological fixation' that Swift shows in this work. :Dmore
I read this book finally, upto the last page, as a part of a very interesting course on 18th C literature, and I loved the insights into Swift's work the course gave me. Specially amusing was my professor's fascination with the 'scatological fixation' that Swift shows in this work. :Dmore
I read this book finally, upto the last page, as a part of a very interesting course on 18th C literature, and I loved the insights into Swift's work the course gave me. Specially amusing was my professor's fascination with the 'scatological fixation' that Swift shows in this work. :Dmore
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