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Libro de cuentos para ninos, la selva es el escenario y personaje omnipresente. La selva misionera, con su violencia natural incontenible, frente al hombre, aliado a veces, destructor las más, de esa naturaleza salvaje. Y en medio, la fauna: desde la gigantesca serpiente que declara la guerra al hombre, hasta el indefenso cachorro muerto equivocadamente por la mano de su propio amo.
Humor y tragedia se combinan eficazmente en estos cuentos, dando como resultado ejemplos antológicos de ese difícil arte que es el cuento, en el que Quiroga se reveló auténtico maestro.

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ISBN: 9789635269976
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I put of reading this book for so long, I had begun to believe I had actually read it! It is quite biting in it's satire and very funny, but there are parts where it gets tedious.more
Pretty good stuff. Book 3 isn't as great, and book 4 gets a little preachy at times, but fun to read. Makes me wonder about Yahoo's decision to name themselves after it; Yahoos represent a pretty cynical, misanthropic view of humanity.more
This is a fantastical satire that uses the ancient method of a journey (in this case multiple journeys) to foreign lands in the service of social satire and cultural commentary. The motivating force behind Gulliver's Travels is the author's apparent disgust with human folly and pretension; the ideas are embodied in grotesques and fantastic creatures, in the six-inch high Lilliputians, the gigantic Brobdingnagians, the horse-like Houyhnhnms and the disgusting Yahoos. These characters are so memorable that their names have become part of our culture. The journeys provide lessons for Lemuel Gulliver who is an honest if gullible narrator. Whether he learned the right lessons or ones that have value for others is for each reader to decided. However, concluding, he confesses that he could be reconciled to the English Yahoos "if they would be content with those Vices and Follies only which Nature hath entitled them to. I am not in the least provoked at the sight of a Lawyer, a Pick-pocket, a Colonel, a Fool, a Lord, a Gamster, a Politician, a Whoremunger, a Physician, . . . or the like: This is all according to the due Course of Things: but, when I behold a Lump of Deformity, and Diseases both in Body and Mind, smitten with Pride, it immediately breaks all the Measures of my patience."more
Most people have seen a cinematic version of this book, right? Most already know the story without actually bothering with reading the book? The book was written nearly 300 years old so some of the little of the language will be a little archaic but it's only a kids book so will be an easy read. Given the age of the story it will have very little relevance with events of today.Well at least that is what I thought beforehand. How very wrong I was!For those of you who do not know the story Gulliver basically visits four islands, one populated by a lot of little people, the next by some giants, then moving on to a flying island before finally landing on one ruled by horses where humens are the savages, something akin to the films Planet of the Apes but with horses rather than chimpanzees. Firstly the title is something of a misnomer. Rather than describing happenings in far off fanciful lands Swift is really only interested in taking a satirical swipe at events and in particular the politics an awful lot closer to home,namely London. Swift's family was originally from England but had backed the losing side in the English Civil War whereupon having lost their lands there were forced to take up residence Ireland. Swift was born and educated in Dublin but moved from his birthplace to London as a young man and there he became very active in the politics of the day,firstly as a Whig sympathiser then as a Tory. However, when the hoped for preferments failed to materialize Swift was virtually exiled back to Ireland making him rather bitter towards the political elite back in London.Some of the satire is fairly obvious, liking peeing on the palace in Lilliput to extinguish a fire there (in fact bodily functions seem to play a large part of the first two sections) but some other referances were I admit quite lost on me. Rather than travel broadening the mind it seemed to make Gulliver's more inward looking, so much so in the end he cannot bear the sight or touch of fellow humans, and this is probably where the book lost me as a fan. Personally I found the part on Laputa rather dull and very long-winded which was followed by the stay with the Houyhnhms which felt merely like the ramblings of a very bitter and disappointed in life man.On the whole I found the book interesting but ultimately a little disappointing and I certainy enjoyed Lilliput the most.more
This nearly 300 year old classic deserves its reputation, but it is a novel of two halves. The first two books of the four, in which Gulliver visits respectively Lilliput (very small people) and Brobdingnag (giants) are very good, funny, adventurous, imaginative and bawdy and would be worth 5/5 by themselves. However, I found the latter two books when he visits the flying island of Laputa and other lands; then in the final book, the land of the Houyhnhnms (intelligent horses subjugating primates who resemble degraded humans) duller and a lot harder to get through. They contain a lot of quite clever satire on the human condition and on civic life in Europe, but are rather overegged and over long, with little plot so rather a slog. 2/5 for the latter half, so overall 3.5/5.more
For good reason, this is a must read classic. The book appeals on a superficial level with the author's exotic travels, and yet has a far deeper message about human nature and the society of the day.Prior reviewers (and Wikipedia) summarize its contents, so I will not do so again. However, my favorite section of the book is contained with chapter 4 regarding the land of Houyhnhnms (horses) and Yahoos (uncivilized humans). The author's sometimes graphic depiction of his homeland's princes, lawyers, doctors and military leaders is absolutely hilarious and thought provoking.more
No wonder this novel is considered a classic which has been enjoyed "in the nursery" and in the library! Jonathan Swift wrote a story in the 1700s which is absolutely timeless. On one level this is a delightful fantasy romp to imagined lands with amazing inhabitants. However, do not be deceived. This is a philosophical treatise written with tremendous wit and a profound message about the author's desire for truth, indeed his bottomless pit of want for truth. The author levels his satiric wit at the following topics and fires away: religion, travel tales, politics, sex, relationships, colonialism, capitalism, prejudice, social superficiality, prejudice, stereotypes and more. Anyone who has traveled to a culture which is vastly different from their own and reveled in the experience will likely appreciate this book, and those who have not but harbor strong opinions about those folks from another culture......well, it should be required reading! Go ahead, read it and laugh out loud, smile, wince, cringe, and love it!more
As I was on the road, observing the littleness of the houses, the trees, the cattle, and the people, I began to think myself in Lilliput. I was afraid of trampling on every traveller I met, and often called aloud to have them stand out of the way, so that I had like to have gotten one or two broken heads for my impertinence.(Gulliver on his return to England from Brobdingnag) The introduction by Gulliver's cousin is followed by a letter from Gulliver which makes him sound completely insane and obsessed by horses, and I started to doubt whether the journeys were a figment of his imagination. Gulliver becomes more and more neurotic each time he returns home, in marked contrast to how he copes with what should be far more stressful events while travelling. He takes shipwreck, mutiny and capture in his stride, and quickly becomes fluent in unknown languages, yet after his final journey he is unable to face talking to or touching his wife and children, and spends four hours a day or more in the stables talking to his horses.I don't think you have to have detailed knowledge of early 18th century history to get the satire. Religious quarrels, politicians, lawyers and egg-head scientists are good targets for satire in all ages. the stories have plenty of amusing moments, such as the Lilliputian queen's horror at Gulliver's method of extinguishing a fire in the palace, and her refusal ever to occupy that part of the building again, no matter how thoroughly they were cleaned. However, when I came across this description of Lilliputian handwriting, it made me wonder whether it was a satirical dig at something I hand;t picked up on or if the author had just put it in to tease a particular English lady who had trouble writing in a straight line: I shall say but little at present of their learning, which, for many ages, has flourished in all its branches among them: but their manner of writing is very peculiar, being neither from the left to the right, like the Europeans, nor from the right to the left, like the Arabians, nor from up to down, like the Chinese, but aslant, from one corner of the paper to the other, like ladies in England.more
Gulliver's Travels has some amusing and even a few insightful bits, but Swift was no Voltaire. A satire not so much on some particular human follies as on man as such, this book is basically a monument to misanthropy---as is made painfully clear in the heavy-handed fourth part. Not that satire has to be subtle, but it should at least be accurate, at most an exaggeration of the truth rather than a projection of one's own bitter prejudices. Swift's portrayal of human society, even as imperfect as it was (and even more so in his time than now), is at best one-sided. It ends with the narrator repulsed by the smell of his wife, and disgusted with himself for ever having couple with her and brought children into the world. If you can sympathize with that sentiment, then you might find Swift's satire to be penetrating and clever. If, on the other hand, you see any value in human life and hold it to be more important than the vice and suffering that necessarily characterize some part of it, then you might be better off reading something else.more
I read this book finally, upto the last page, as a part of a very interesting course on 18th C literature, and I loved the insights into Swift's work the course gave me. Specially amusing was my professor's fascination with the 'scatological fixation' that Swift shows in this work. :Dmore
The introduction to my edition claims that "Gulliver's Travels has held our attention for nearly three centuries because of its uncanny ability to be whatever we have wanted it to be: a political book, a children's book, a merry book, a mad book, satiric, ironic, parodic, perhaps a novel, perhaps not." The source material sure doesn't read like children's fare. Although I suppose small boys might very well adore the bathroom humor, I can't see them getting past the antique language with unending paragraphs, random capitalizations, archaic spellings and a wealth of political allusions needing footnotes to unravel. And after the first half, with Gulliver as giant to the Lilliputans and then a doll-sized figure among the giant Brobdingnags, these tall tales become both too erudite and too bitter for children. In the third part dealing with the flying island of Laputa, the political allegory becomes a lot more pointed. Gulliver's Travels reminds me of a blend of Alice in Wonderland and science fiction--using strange unknown lands and peoples to look at ourselves in fresh ways. It's often funny and wildly imaginative in its details, although other parts make for heavy reading with lots of dense, pedantic exposition. I wouldn't call Swift congenial company among classic writers. He said in a letter to Pope his purpose is "to vex the world rather than divert it." Swift also strikes me as a very conservative mindset, and I don't mean that in a simple political capital "C" contemporary sense. In fact in some ways he can be very forward looking for his period. He believed women should be educated the same as men and had the same intellectual potential. So the introduction and notes say, and you can see hints of that view in Gulliver's Travels and more explicitly in his "Letter to a Young Lady." But Swift is also deeply suspicious of innovation or the possibility of real progress. To change is to degenerate according to Swift, not improve. The derision leveled at the Academy in Part III and its junk science and absurdest art is particularly cutting--and still feels relevant. (Although that's nothing to the utterly scathing rant against lawyers in Part IV--and yes, a lot of its points are still relevant too.) Certainly his tale in the last part of the Yahoos (humanoid beasts) and Houyhnhnms (horse-shaped but noble and rational) is deeply biting about human nature. Given this is all told through Gulliver's first person narrative and the way Gulliver degenerates after living among the Houyhnhms I'm not certain which ways it cuts. Are the Houyhnhms really noble creatures against which humans are found wanting? Or are they a commentary about the dehumanizing effects of slavery and imperialism?I suppose I might be able to tell better by reading more of Swift. And I tried. The edition I have includes other writings by Swift, the most substantial of which is The Tale of the Tub. I'm afraid I found it far less engaging than Gulliver's Travels. Perhaps if I were a student of the period or a contemporary of Swift I might have found it much more relevant or amusing. But since I really couldn't care less whether Roman Catholicism, the Church of England, or "Dissenters" such as Baptists or Quakers constitute the "true" faith I admit I was soon so very, very bored--and grateful I wasn't forced to read this for school. The one other work of Swift beside Gulliver's Travels I would very much recommend to a general reader is his lacerating satiric essay "A Modest Proposal." I don't want to give too much away, but it's one of those very few essays, such as Virginia Woolf's "A Room of One's Own," that you remember vividly once read even decades later.more
Jonathan Swift's satirical novel was first published in 1726, yet it is still valid today. Gulliver's Travels describes the four fantastic voyages of Lemuel Gulliver, a kindly ship's surgeon. Swift portrays him as an observer, a reporter, and a victim of circumstance. His travels take him to Lilliput where he is a giant observing tiny people. In Brobdingnag, the tables are reversed and he is the tiny person in a land of giants where he is exhibited as a curiosity at markets and fairs. The flying island of Laputa is the scene of his next voyage. The people plan and plot as their country lies in ruins. It is a world of illusion and distorted values. The fourth and final voyage takes him to the home of the Houyhnhnms, gentle horses who rule the land. He also encounters Yahoos, filthy bestial creatures who resemble humans.more
A good read, I did not always understand all of the historical satire (luckily I read an annotated version that explained most of it)it was a fun adventure that is ironic and humorous and sometimes absurd.Gulliver leaves home by ship on various voyages, all of which leave him stranded in new, strange places. One is a country of small people and all of their surroundings are accordingly small. The next is a land of giants, and all of the surroundings are equally as large. Thirdly is a floating island in the sky populated by wacky scientists and astronomers. And lastly, is an island where horses are the intelligent race, having their own language, and the human like creatures of this land are savage and disgusting. All through his travels Gulliver learns the language and customs of the new lands' inhabitants making it difficult to merge back into his actual life.I'm glad I read this book.more
Oh Gulliver. What a strange and interesting boook. Lilliput was by far the best of the four books, but I like Swifts satiric commentary in all four. Swift is a genius, enough said.more
I have been reading "Gulliver's Travels" by Jonathan Swift on my Ipod Touch for the last several months during the odd moments of time like waiting in line. The book is a novel in four parts about the travels of Lemuel Gulliver to various parts of the world. The book was a real surprise for me. I had always thought of it as a children's book. The classic scene is Gulliver tied up by the Lilliputian's until they figure out that he doesn't mean to harm them.There is this vague sense that things are all great at the end. Wrong! The Lilliptutan's are a bunch of small minded people and Gulliver soon ends up in trouble. First he puts out a fire in the Queen's castle by urinating on it, drenching the Queen. That makes her mad. Second, he helps the Lilliputan's in their long standing war against the island of Blefusco but refuses to help make Blefusco totally subservient to Lilliput. He is sentenced to be blinded as punishment for this treason so he escapes.Next he winds up in the Kingdom of Brobdingnag where instead of being twelve times bigger than the inhabitants as he was in Lilliput,he is twelve times smaller. He is found by a farmer who displays him for money. Gulliver ends up in the royal court and then the story gets kind of kinky. He is used as a kind of a sexual plaything and is molested by the women of the court, including a sixteen your old girl. Gulliver writes about how disgusting the giant naked women are. This part was a hoot. I wouldn't read it as a bedtime story to your kids.Gulliver leaves Brobdingnag and has several other adventures. His final destination is the Country of the Houyhnhnm. The Houyhnhnm are a kind of a horse shaped beings. Their are human's there called Yahoo who are looked down upon by the Houyhnhnm as being base and menial and not good for much. The Houyhnhnm are very advanced and rational and listen with dismay as Gulliver tells them about Europe and how governments are run.Eventually Gulliver has to leave Houyhnhnm and return to England. At this point he has been transformed from the happy go lucky adventurer to a recluse, disgusted by all contact with humans, even with his wife, whom can hardly stand.The book is a great read. Swift is very imaginative and has a great writing style. I give it four stars out of five. It''s a classic. I'm going to miss it.Does anybody have a recommendation for another classic for me to read?more
This book is one of the best examples of satire. Swift takes on a trip around the world to show us the problems right at home. Though some have criticized the end of the book, I found it to be the best part. We see the human race totally flipped upside down and it was the most eye-opening section of the book. I picked the book up because I thought it would be about an adventure, but it is so much more than that.more
I can't help but wonder what a conversation with Mr. Swift might have been like. He is so overwhelmingly conscious of all the faults of human kind that it is almost depressing to come to the end of "Gulliver's Travels" and feel condemned to be such a Yahoo! Still, it must be admitted that his observations are truthful. One thing I found particularly interesting about the book was the bluntness with which Mr. Swift addresses such things as bodily functions - and the chapters about the Yahoos are quite distasteful if the reader stops to consider that Gulliver makes a boat using the skin and fat of humans, as well as articles of clothing and sails. Somehow, by assigning another name, and continually referring to Yahoos as brutes, Mr. Swift leads the reader to skim right past these details.more
Or to give it its full and proper title, Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships. Like many children, I had an abridged version with just the Lilliput section (probably bowdlerised), and I'd also read excerpts from the other sections. I have very fond memories, and since the complete text is available on public domain ebook sites, I decided that it was time to read the whole thing from start to finish.I don't have the background in history to know exactly who and what Swift was lampooning without having to look it up on Wikipedia, but it doesn't matter. His biting satire is just as relevant to today's politics, even if the exact targets have changed. There are places where the modern reader will probably cringe at Swift's own prejudices, but by and large this is a hilarious take-down of bigotry, prejudice and hypocrisy that rings just as true now as it must have in 1726. The parody of the traveller's tales books popular at the time isn't quite as accessible, but it doesn't require very much effort to draw a parallel with modern writing. I found the fourth section dragged a bit, but that's partly because Swift had quite thoroughly made his point by then, and was repeating himself to some extent. But this book is a classic for good reason.more
Gulliver’s Travels is a recount by Lumeul Gulliver of how he travels to different islands that are by no means ordinary. He begins by telling about himself. Gulliver is actually a man who, after losing his business on the mainland, becomes a surgeon for different ships, sometimes even being the captain of some ships. The first adventure takes place in Lilliput, an island inhabited by tiny human-like creatures. Gulliver arrives on the island through a shipwreck and wakes up bound to the ground. This is due to the people of Lilliput binding him to the ground. At first, they attack him when Gulliver seems to threaten them. After realizing that Gulliver won’t cause them harm, the Lilliput people bring food and drink to Gulliver. Taken to the capital city, he is introduced to the emperor, while Gulliver is flattered, who is entertained by Gulliver. As time follows, Gulliver is used as someone to help the Lilliput people fight against the Blefuscu people. The two have gone into a war due to the way the Blefuscu crack their eggs. While the Lilliput people were nice to Gulliver at first, he is convicted for treason after he puts out a fire in the royal palace. This leads to his punishments being shot in the eyes and then starved. Luckily, Gulliver is able to escape to Blefuscu and repair a boat, therefore being able to sail to the mainland. Gulliver arrives home and stays with his family for a bit before leaving again. This time he arrives on the island of Brobdingnag, a place where giants rule. At first kept as a pet, Gulliver is eventually taken to the queen. This results in Gulliver being an entertainer for the court and, though social life is easy, disgust for how large the people of Brobdingnag are. This enlarges pores and other physical flaws. With ignorance ruling the Brobdingnag people, Gulliver eventually leaves the island after a bird picks up his cage before dropping him into the ocean. This leads Gulliver to be picked up by pirates and staying on the floating island, Laputa. The people, though, are too out of touch with reality. With a small trip to places which have people such as Julius Caesar and immortals that prove that wisdom does not come with age, Gulliver ends up back in England. The final journey that Gulliver tells about is one in which he meets a group of intelligent horse people who, while beings friends with Gulliver, served by the human Yahoos. Unintelligent and causing distortions of humans for Gulliver, the Yahoos are a group of people that Gulliver would rather not be with. Though he wishes to stay on the island, Gulliver is forced to leave after the Houyhnhnms realize how Yahoo like he is. Regretful to leave, Gulliver is picked up by a Portuguese ship and taken back to the mainland. I believe that the book was quite a good one. I think that though it had some good points and some bad points, it was overall a good book. I love the first person perspective that Jonathan Swift used. I think that the book would not be as good if it weren’t for this. I love how the book gives a good time perspective and has great description. The way the Gulliver is describing what is around him is very realistic and gives me a good idea of what it would be like to be there myself. The book is something I would certainly recommend to other people. Gulliver’s Travels is definitely a five star book.more
The last time that I read this book, I must have been about nine years old. I would be fascinated to turn up that copy because it must have been heavily edited. This book is full of biting criticism of the failings of the human race and much too grown up for the average child.A further point of interest is that whilst most people will know of Gulliver, they will talk of his trip to Lilliput and, just possibly to a land of giants: very few people speak of the other two lands visited - a city in the sky and a land where horse-like creatures rule. It is, however, to these two that I would imagine Swift would attribute the kernel of his tale. The horse people are very close to being the first si-fi book because it is clear that Swift is creating a race totally at variance with human beings.Considering its age, the book has some remarkably prescient forecasts of modern living. I was struck by Laputa where Swift talks of language being cut and mauled in much the way that 'Text speak' does. I was also surprised by his decision to laud the Houyhnhnms to the extent whereby Gulliver is unable to settle back amongst his own kind: even today, I find myself bridling at such an attitude.If your child has some bastardised version of this tale upon his or her bookshelf, then rip it away and wait until they reach maturity: it is a crime that this book has been reduced to kiddie fodder.more
PART I. A REVIEW OF THE BOOK.[The author gives some account of the book, Gulliver’s Travels. Her first memories of Gulliver. She reads the first couple of chapters and enjoys the satire immensely. Gets to the third chapter; is surprised at the science fictional, dystopian tone, is thoroughly hit over the head with Swift’s criticism of politics and humanity, and finishes the book knowing that there is no way she has ever before been exposed to the last two voyages Gulliver undertakes.:]I have always thought of Gulliver’s Travels as primarily a story for children. This is probably due to the number of “Gulliver” cartoons and picture books I have seen over the years. However, I’m sure that what I’ve seen only deals with a simple telling of the first two of Gulliver’s voyages described in the book and that those depictions were not nearly as full of sharp, biting criticism and satire as the unabridged version of the book itself, as Gulliver’s Travels is really not a children’s story at all. I also understand why the cartoons do not delve into the third and fourth journeys described in the book as I found them to be quite dark. Lemuel Gulliver, a ship’s surgeon, tells an amusing story of traveling the world in the early 18th century and the strange lands and peoples he comes in contact with. Gulliver’s accounts are given in a matter-of-fact way and are quite detailed while lacking in emotion. Gulliver is quite gullible and humorless himself, which just adds to the satirical effect of the book. During one voyage, Gulliver is shipwrecked and awakes on the island of Lilliput, where the inhabitants are all roughly six inches tall. His time in that kingdom satirizes the ridiculousness of feuds, wars, and royal pomp and show. Likewise, on Gulliver’s second voyage he is again an oddity due to his size as he winds up in the land of the giants in Brobdingnag, where he now stands a relative six inches tall compared to the sixty foot tall inhabitants there. During his time in Brobdingnag, Gulliver explains European systems of law and government to the prince who cannot believe that such a political system could even function. On his next journey, Gulliver’s ship is overtaken by pirates and he is rescued by the people on the floating island of Laputa, peopled by philosophers and scientists who are “floating on the clouds” like the island, as they are so lost in thought they lose all sight of practicality. Gulliver travels between islands in this land and is able to meet and question great historical figures who have gone before. He also comes in contact with Struldbergs, immortal people who become miserable the longer they live. On his last expedition Gulliver washes ashore at Houyhnhnm, a land where wise and gentle but emotionless species resembles horses and wild human-like beasts are referred to as Yahoos. Gulliver is very taken with the Houyhnhnm although he sees himself as a Yahoo, whom he despises. Gulliver returns home against his will and the story ends on a very bleak note. I much prefer the amusing way in which Swift pokes fun at the inane and ridiculous elements of English society in the first two voyages to the odd, depressing images left by the last two excursions and his trip home. Well, that’s just the opinion of this Yahoo. Read the book yourself and see what you think.more
Swift's Gulliver's Travels was next. This book was a self narrated account of various travels by a man named Gulliver. Whether it be his first voyage and being ship wrecked to wake up in the world of tiny people (Lilliput) where the people had to give up a LOT of food to feed him, or how some of them wanted to kill him but didn't know what to do with his body if they did, to the world of GIANTS in the land of Brobdingnag where he was carried about in a box, how eagles fought to take him for food, how his owner, the farmer initially used him to make money by showing him off then he was owned by the queen, or when he was attacked by pirates and ending up in Laputa and Balnibarbi, or when he talked to all the historical figures in Glubbdubdrib just to find out they had lied to build themselves up, or when he went to Luggnaggians and Struldbrugs or Japan it was interesting how he used social commentary in this book. I guess that was the best part and the faciful ideas of other cultures, languages, and magnifying various aspects and governmental and occupational characteristics of people and character flaws that he saw in life. It was also interesting how he was driven to continue to travel and not stay with his family/wife so he continued to travel. He often worked as a doc aboard ship since his business failed. Overall, I would not rate this book very highly. I'd like to hear your ideas about it though and find out the things you found interesting in it. I’m sorry for being unclear in my last reply. I reread it and am embarrassed at the laziness in my writing. Basically what I was referring to was Swift’s juxtaposition of the two people groups, the Yahoos and the Houyhnhnms. The Houyhnhnms were obviously Gulliver preferred people. He seemed, at least to me, to be content with their way of life, the stability and way of going about things. He put them on a pedestal for their intelligence, ability to reason, “ethics,” etc in spite of their problems. It was clear that Gulliver did not like the Yahoo’s way of life even though he resembled them most. He was repulsed by their characteristics and behaviors even though he was criticizing humanity. I did like the concept of “Not being a people that tell things that are not” and being truthful. I really took that whole section as Swift’s own self-deception of finding a group of people being above reproach. I too think that we are smart enough to not do horrible things yet we still do. I rated it lower because it was not the childhood book I thought it was but it was fun nontheless (as an adult).more
I actually don't like many of the classics, but this is one of my favorites. It can be a little tedious to start, but once you're into it, it's a great story.more
Gulliver’s Travels written by Jonathan Swift is definitely one of the most interesting yet adventurous books I have ever read. The main character, Gulliver, voyages to different places such as Lilliput, Brobdingnag, etc. Gulliver is just a normal character who enjoys and experiences many different adventures. Gulliver gets to be an enormous creature, a minuscule person, a genius among primitive beasts, and on a floating island. Here is just a brief description of the different parts of this book. In the first part of his journey, Gulliver is taken captive by Lilliputians on the land of Lilliput; he is considered a giant to the Lilliputians. This part is personally my favorite part because it is a very well-known tale to me and probably the most humorous, entertaining part of the whole book. In the second part of his journey, Gulliver lands on the land of Brobdinghag where the people are roughly twelve times bigger than Gulliver (everything in Brobdingnag is twelve times larger). The third part of the journey introduces the reader to the flying island of Laputa. In the last part of the book, Gulliver travels to the country of the Houyhnhnms (Houyhnhnms are horses who rule the country). Though this is a great book I suggest having a dictionary by your side when reading this book because the text can be very challenging and sometimes confusing. Swift’s creativity and imagination is quite remarkable in this novel and a one of a kind novel filled with a variety adventures. I recommended this book to readers who enjoy adventures, classic novels and literatures.more
I had a picture book version of this as a child, which I loved and which became suitably dog-eared over time. The grown-up version is equally delicious, and just the most perfect form of adventure. I must admit I can’t understand why you’d ever go to sea again after going to Lilliput, because I think I would be truly apprehensive, but there’s an adventurous spirit at work in this book that you don’t often see in literature. I read this very quickly, because I found it engrossing and the exploits grew increasingly, well, a little bit strange... definitely one to read!more
One of the most remarkable books in the English language. Swift dissects, shrinks, magnifies and distorts the world around him, and invites us along to witness the results through the eyes of Lemuel Gulliver, who -for deviation from planned routes- must rank among the world's unluckiest travellers. It is a great story, a great satire, and a book that rewards repeated readings.more
A very well-known tale this one. Especially his first travel to Lilliput. The fantasy of the tale is fantastic. But that could be told in a hundred pages. But this is not really a work of fiction, it was written as a political satire, so Swift writes a great deal about human nature and how bad it is performing. Which is far less eye-pleasing.more
I thought this was an okay book. I understand what Swift was trying to accomplish with his 4 different worlds--the lessons he was trying to teach--but I wasn't that engaged with the stories. There were some interesting bits of writing, but overall, just one of those classics I felt I needed to read to be a well-rounded person. Yes, I am much rounder now but it has nothing to do with this book.more
This is no child's book, but a fantastic display of satire and political statement. I laughed to the point of tears several times after reading how Mr. Gulliver chose to distinguish the palace fire in Lilliput. Highly recommended.more
Was Glubbdubdrib on J.K. Rowling's mind when she envisaged Hogwarts? Swift's deadpan satire is a treat, but so is his earnest advocacy of freedom.more
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Reviews

I put of reading this book for so long, I had begun to believe I had actually read it! It is quite biting in it's satire and very funny, but there are parts where it gets tedious.more
Pretty good stuff. Book 3 isn't as great, and book 4 gets a little preachy at times, but fun to read. Makes me wonder about Yahoo's decision to name themselves after it; Yahoos represent a pretty cynical, misanthropic view of humanity.more
This is a fantastical satire that uses the ancient method of a journey (in this case multiple journeys) to foreign lands in the service of social satire and cultural commentary. The motivating force behind Gulliver's Travels is the author's apparent disgust with human folly and pretension; the ideas are embodied in grotesques and fantastic creatures, in the six-inch high Lilliputians, the gigantic Brobdingnagians, the horse-like Houyhnhnms and the disgusting Yahoos. These characters are so memorable that their names have become part of our culture. The journeys provide lessons for Lemuel Gulliver who is an honest if gullible narrator. Whether he learned the right lessons or ones that have value for others is for each reader to decided. However, concluding, he confesses that he could be reconciled to the English Yahoos "if they would be content with those Vices and Follies only which Nature hath entitled them to. I am not in the least provoked at the sight of a Lawyer, a Pick-pocket, a Colonel, a Fool, a Lord, a Gamster, a Politician, a Whoremunger, a Physician, . . . or the like: This is all according to the due Course of Things: but, when I behold a Lump of Deformity, and Diseases both in Body and Mind, smitten with Pride, it immediately breaks all the Measures of my patience."more
Most people have seen a cinematic version of this book, right? Most already know the story without actually bothering with reading the book? The book was written nearly 300 years old so some of the little of the language will be a little archaic but it's only a kids book so will be an easy read. Given the age of the story it will have very little relevance with events of today.Well at least that is what I thought beforehand. How very wrong I was!For those of you who do not know the story Gulliver basically visits four islands, one populated by a lot of little people, the next by some giants, then moving on to a flying island before finally landing on one ruled by horses where humens are the savages, something akin to the films Planet of the Apes but with horses rather than chimpanzees. Firstly the title is something of a misnomer. Rather than describing happenings in far off fanciful lands Swift is really only interested in taking a satirical swipe at events and in particular the politics an awful lot closer to home,namely London. Swift's family was originally from England but had backed the losing side in the English Civil War whereupon having lost their lands there were forced to take up residence Ireland. Swift was born and educated in Dublin but moved from his birthplace to London as a young man and there he became very active in the politics of the day,firstly as a Whig sympathiser then as a Tory. However, when the hoped for preferments failed to materialize Swift was virtually exiled back to Ireland making him rather bitter towards the political elite back in London.Some of the satire is fairly obvious, liking peeing on the palace in Lilliput to extinguish a fire there (in fact bodily functions seem to play a large part of the first two sections) but some other referances were I admit quite lost on me. Rather than travel broadening the mind it seemed to make Gulliver's more inward looking, so much so in the end he cannot bear the sight or touch of fellow humans, and this is probably where the book lost me as a fan. Personally I found the part on Laputa rather dull and very long-winded which was followed by the stay with the Houyhnhms which felt merely like the ramblings of a very bitter and disappointed in life man.On the whole I found the book interesting but ultimately a little disappointing and I certainy enjoyed Lilliput the most.more
This nearly 300 year old classic deserves its reputation, but it is a novel of two halves. The first two books of the four, in which Gulliver visits respectively Lilliput (very small people) and Brobdingnag (giants) are very good, funny, adventurous, imaginative and bawdy and would be worth 5/5 by themselves. However, I found the latter two books when he visits the flying island of Laputa and other lands; then in the final book, the land of the Houyhnhnms (intelligent horses subjugating primates who resemble degraded humans) duller and a lot harder to get through. They contain a lot of quite clever satire on the human condition and on civic life in Europe, but are rather overegged and over long, with little plot so rather a slog. 2/5 for the latter half, so overall 3.5/5.more
For good reason, this is a must read classic. The book appeals on a superficial level with the author's exotic travels, and yet has a far deeper message about human nature and the society of the day.Prior reviewers (and Wikipedia) summarize its contents, so I will not do so again. However, my favorite section of the book is contained with chapter 4 regarding the land of Houyhnhnms (horses) and Yahoos (uncivilized humans). The author's sometimes graphic depiction of his homeland's princes, lawyers, doctors and military leaders is absolutely hilarious and thought provoking.more
No wonder this novel is considered a classic which has been enjoyed "in the nursery" and in the library! Jonathan Swift wrote a story in the 1700s which is absolutely timeless. On one level this is a delightful fantasy romp to imagined lands with amazing inhabitants. However, do not be deceived. This is a philosophical treatise written with tremendous wit and a profound message about the author's desire for truth, indeed his bottomless pit of want for truth. The author levels his satiric wit at the following topics and fires away: religion, travel tales, politics, sex, relationships, colonialism, capitalism, prejudice, social superficiality, prejudice, stereotypes and more. Anyone who has traveled to a culture which is vastly different from their own and reveled in the experience will likely appreciate this book, and those who have not but harbor strong opinions about those folks from another culture......well, it should be required reading! Go ahead, read it and laugh out loud, smile, wince, cringe, and love it!more
As I was on the road, observing the littleness of the houses, the trees, the cattle, and the people, I began to think myself in Lilliput. I was afraid of trampling on every traveller I met, and often called aloud to have them stand out of the way, so that I had like to have gotten one or two broken heads for my impertinence.(Gulliver on his return to England from Brobdingnag) The introduction by Gulliver's cousin is followed by a letter from Gulliver which makes him sound completely insane and obsessed by horses, and I started to doubt whether the journeys were a figment of his imagination. Gulliver becomes more and more neurotic each time he returns home, in marked contrast to how he copes with what should be far more stressful events while travelling. He takes shipwreck, mutiny and capture in his stride, and quickly becomes fluent in unknown languages, yet after his final journey he is unable to face talking to or touching his wife and children, and spends four hours a day or more in the stables talking to his horses.I don't think you have to have detailed knowledge of early 18th century history to get the satire. Religious quarrels, politicians, lawyers and egg-head scientists are good targets for satire in all ages. the stories have plenty of amusing moments, such as the Lilliputian queen's horror at Gulliver's method of extinguishing a fire in the palace, and her refusal ever to occupy that part of the building again, no matter how thoroughly they were cleaned. However, when I came across this description of Lilliputian handwriting, it made me wonder whether it was a satirical dig at something I hand;t picked up on or if the author had just put it in to tease a particular English lady who had trouble writing in a straight line: I shall say but little at present of their learning, which, for many ages, has flourished in all its branches among them: but their manner of writing is very peculiar, being neither from the left to the right, like the Europeans, nor from the right to the left, like the Arabians, nor from up to down, like the Chinese, but aslant, from one corner of the paper to the other, like ladies in England.more
Gulliver's Travels has some amusing and even a few insightful bits, but Swift was no Voltaire. A satire not so much on some particular human follies as on man as such, this book is basically a monument to misanthropy---as is made painfully clear in the heavy-handed fourth part. Not that satire has to be subtle, but it should at least be accurate, at most an exaggeration of the truth rather than a projection of one's own bitter prejudices. Swift's portrayal of human society, even as imperfect as it was (and even more so in his time than now), is at best one-sided. It ends with the narrator repulsed by the smell of his wife, and disgusted with himself for ever having couple with her and brought children into the world. If you can sympathize with that sentiment, then you might find Swift's satire to be penetrating and clever. If, on the other hand, you see any value in human life and hold it to be more important than the vice and suffering that necessarily characterize some part of it, then you might be better off reading something else.more
I read this book finally, upto the last page, as a part of a very interesting course on 18th C literature, and I loved the insights into Swift's work the course gave me. Specially amusing was my professor's fascination with the 'scatological fixation' that Swift shows in this work. :Dmore
The introduction to my edition claims that "Gulliver's Travels has held our attention for nearly three centuries because of its uncanny ability to be whatever we have wanted it to be: a political book, a children's book, a merry book, a mad book, satiric, ironic, parodic, perhaps a novel, perhaps not." The source material sure doesn't read like children's fare. Although I suppose small boys might very well adore the bathroom humor, I can't see them getting past the antique language with unending paragraphs, random capitalizations, archaic spellings and a wealth of political allusions needing footnotes to unravel. And after the first half, with Gulliver as giant to the Lilliputans and then a doll-sized figure among the giant Brobdingnags, these tall tales become both too erudite and too bitter for children. In the third part dealing with the flying island of Laputa, the political allegory becomes a lot more pointed. Gulliver's Travels reminds me of a blend of Alice in Wonderland and science fiction--using strange unknown lands and peoples to look at ourselves in fresh ways. It's often funny and wildly imaginative in its details, although other parts make for heavy reading with lots of dense, pedantic exposition. I wouldn't call Swift congenial company among classic writers. He said in a letter to Pope his purpose is "to vex the world rather than divert it." Swift also strikes me as a very conservative mindset, and I don't mean that in a simple political capital "C" contemporary sense. In fact in some ways he can be very forward looking for his period. He believed women should be educated the same as men and had the same intellectual potential. So the introduction and notes say, and you can see hints of that view in Gulliver's Travels and more explicitly in his "Letter to a Young Lady." But Swift is also deeply suspicious of innovation or the possibility of real progress. To change is to degenerate according to Swift, not improve. The derision leveled at the Academy in Part III and its junk science and absurdest art is particularly cutting--and still feels relevant. (Although that's nothing to the utterly scathing rant against lawyers in Part IV--and yes, a lot of its points are still relevant too.) Certainly his tale in the last part of the Yahoos (humanoid beasts) and Houyhnhnms (horse-shaped but noble and rational) is deeply biting about human nature. Given this is all told through Gulliver's first person narrative and the way Gulliver degenerates after living among the Houyhnhms I'm not certain which ways it cuts. Are the Houyhnhms really noble creatures against which humans are found wanting? Or are they a commentary about the dehumanizing effects of slavery and imperialism?I suppose I might be able to tell better by reading more of Swift. And I tried. The edition I have includes other writings by Swift, the most substantial of which is The Tale of the Tub. I'm afraid I found it far less engaging than Gulliver's Travels. Perhaps if I were a student of the period or a contemporary of Swift I might have found it much more relevant or amusing. But since I really couldn't care less whether Roman Catholicism, the Church of England, or "Dissenters" such as Baptists or Quakers constitute the "true" faith I admit I was soon so very, very bored--and grateful I wasn't forced to read this for school. The one other work of Swift beside Gulliver's Travels I would very much recommend to a general reader is his lacerating satiric essay "A Modest Proposal." I don't want to give too much away, but it's one of those very few essays, such as Virginia Woolf's "A Room of One's Own," that you remember vividly once read even decades later.more
Jonathan Swift's satirical novel was first published in 1726, yet it is still valid today. Gulliver's Travels describes the four fantastic voyages of Lemuel Gulliver, a kindly ship's surgeon. Swift portrays him as an observer, a reporter, and a victim of circumstance. His travels take him to Lilliput where he is a giant observing tiny people. In Brobdingnag, the tables are reversed and he is the tiny person in a land of giants where he is exhibited as a curiosity at markets and fairs. The flying island of Laputa is the scene of his next voyage. The people plan and plot as their country lies in ruins. It is a world of illusion and distorted values. The fourth and final voyage takes him to the home of the Houyhnhnms, gentle horses who rule the land. He also encounters Yahoos, filthy bestial creatures who resemble humans.more
A good read, I did not always understand all of the historical satire (luckily I read an annotated version that explained most of it)it was a fun adventure that is ironic and humorous and sometimes absurd.Gulliver leaves home by ship on various voyages, all of which leave him stranded in new, strange places. One is a country of small people and all of their surroundings are accordingly small. The next is a land of giants, and all of the surroundings are equally as large. Thirdly is a floating island in the sky populated by wacky scientists and astronomers. And lastly, is an island where horses are the intelligent race, having their own language, and the human like creatures of this land are savage and disgusting. All through his travels Gulliver learns the language and customs of the new lands' inhabitants making it difficult to merge back into his actual life.I'm glad I read this book.more
Oh Gulliver. What a strange and interesting boook. Lilliput was by far the best of the four books, but I like Swifts satiric commentary in all four. Swift is a genius, enough said.more
I have been reading "Gulliver's Travels" by Jonathan Swift on my Ipod Touch for the last several months during the odd moments of time like waiting in line. The book is a novel in four parts about the travels of Lemuel Gulliver to various parts of the world. The book was a real surprise for me. I had always thought of it as a children's book. The classic scene is Gulliver tied up by the Lilliputian's until they figure out that he doesn't mean to harm them.There is this vague sense that things are all great at the end. Wrong! The Lilliptutan's are a bunch of small minded people and Gulliver soon ends up in trouble. First he puts out a fire in the Queen's castle by urinating on it, drenching the Queen. That makes her mad. Second, he helps the Lilliputan's in their long standing war against the island of Blefusco but refuses to help make Blefusco totally subservient to Lilliput. He is sentenced to be blinded as punishment for this treason so he escapes.Next he winds up in the Kingdom of Brobdingnag where instead of being twelve times bigger than the inhabitants as he was in Lilliput,he is twelve times smaller. He is found by a farmer who displays him for money. Gulliver ends up in the royal court and then the story gets kind of kinky. He is used as a kind of a sexual plaything and is molested by the women of the court, including a sixteen your old girl. Gulliver writes about how disgusting the giant naked women are. This part was a hoot. I wouldn't read it as a bedtime story to your kids.Gulliver leaves Brobdingnag and has several other adventures. His final destination is the Country of the Houyhnhnm. The Houyhnhnm are a kind of a horse shaped beings. Their are human's there called Yahoo who are looked down upon by the Houyhnhnm as being base and menial and not good for much. The Houyhnhnm are very advanced and rational and listen with dismay as Gulliver tells them about Europe and how governments are run.Eventually Gulliver has to leave Houyhnhnm and return to England. At this point he has been transformed from the happy go lucky adventurer to a recluse, disgusted by all contact with humans, even with his wife, whom can hardly stand.The book is a great read. Swift is very imaginative and has a great writing style. I give it four stars out of five. It''s a classic. I'm going to miss it.Does anybody have a recommendation for another classic for me to read?more
This book is one of the best examples of satire. Swift takes on a trip around the world to show us the problems right at home. Though some have criticized the end of the book, I found it to be the best part. We see the human race totally flipped upside down and it was the most eye-opening section of the book. I picked the book up because I thought it would be about an adventure, but it is so much more than that.more
I can't help but wonder what a conversation with Mr. Swift might have been like. He is so overwhelmingly conscious of all the faults of human kind that it is almost depressing to come to the end of "Gulliver's Travels" and feel condemned to be such a Yahoo! Still, it must be admitted that his observations are truthful. One thing I found particularly interesting about the book was the bluntness with which Mr. Swift addresses such things as bodily functions - and the chapters about the Yahoos are quite distasteful if the reader stops to consider that Gulliver makes a boat using the skin and fat of humans, as well as articles of clothing and sails. Somehow, by assigning another name, and continually referring to Yahoos as brutes, Mr. Swift leads the reader to skim right past these details.more
Or to give it its full and proper title, Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships. Like many children, I had an abridged version with just the Lilliput section (probably bowdlerised), and I'd also read excerpts from the other sections. I have very fond memories, and since the complete text is available on public domain ebook sites, I decided that it was time to read the whole thing from start to finish.I don't have the background in history to know exactly who and what Swift was lampooning without having to look it up on Wikipedia, but it doesn't matter. His biting satire is just as relevant to today's politics, even if the exact targets have changed. There are places where the modern reader will probably cringe at Swift's own prejudices, but by and large this is a hilarious take-down of bigotry, prejudice and hypocrisy that rings just as true now as it must have in 1726. The parody of the traveller's tales books popular at the time isn't quite as accessible, but it doesn't require very much effort to draw a parallel with modern writing. I found the fourth section dragged a bit, but that's partly because Swift had quite thoroughly made his point by then, and was repeating himself to some extent. But this book is a classic for good reason.more
Gulliver’s Travels is a recount by Lumeul Gulliver of how he travels to different islands that are by no means ordinary. He begins by telling about himself. Gulliver is actually a man who, after losing his business on the mainland, becomes a surgeon for different ships, sometimes even being the captain of some ships. The first adventure takes place in Lilliput, an island inhabited by tiny human-like creatures. Gulliver arrives on the island through a shipwreck and wakes up bound to the ground. This is due to the people of Lilliput binding him to the ground. At first, they attack him when Gulliver seems to threaten them. After realizing that Gulliver won’t cause them harm, the Lilliput people bring food and drink to Gulliver. Taken to the capital city, he is introduced to the emperor, while Gulliver is flattered, who is entertained by Gulliver. As time follows, Gulliver is used as someone to help the Lilliput people fight against the Blefuscu people. The two have gone into a war due to the way the Blefuscu crack their eggs. While the Lilliput people were nice to Gulliver at first, he is convicted for treason after he puts out a fire in the royal palace. This leads to his punishments being shot in the eyes and then starved. Luckily, Gulliver is able to escape to Blefuscu and repair a boat, therefore being able to sail to the mainland. Gulliver arrives home and stays with his family for a bit before leaving again. This time he arrives on the island of Brobdingnag, a place where giants rule. At first kept as a pet, Gulliver is eventually taken to the queen. This results in Gulliver being an entertainer for the court and, though social life is easy, disgust for how large the people of Brobdingnag are. This enlarges pores and other physical flaws. With ignorance ruling the Brobdingnag people, Gulliver eventually leaves the island after a bird picks up his cage before dropping him into the ocean. This leads Gulliver to be picked up by pirates and staying on the floating island, Laputa. The people, though, are too out of touch with reality. With a small trip to places which have people such as Julius Caesar and immortals that prove that wisdom does not come with age, Gulliver ends up back in England. The final journey that Gulliver tells about is one in which he meets a group of intelligent horse people who, while beings friends with Gulliver, served by the human Yahoos. Unintelligent and causing distortions of humans for Gulliver, the Yahoos are a group of people that Gulliver would rather not be with. Though he wishes to stay on the island, Gulliver is forced to leave after the Houyhnhnms realize how Yahoo like he is. Regretful to leave, Gulliver is picked up by a Portuguese ship and taken back to the mainland. I believe that the book was quite a good one. I think that though it had some good points and some bad points, it was overall a good book. I love the first person perspective that Jonathan Swift used. I think that the book would not be as good if it weren’t for this. I love how the book gives a good time perspective and has great description. The way the Gulliver is describing what is around him is very realistic and gives me a good idea of what it would be like to be there myself. The book is something I would certainly recommend to other people. Gulliver’s Travels is definitely a five star book.more
The last time that I read this book, I must have been about nine years old. I would be fascinated to turn up that copy because it must have been heavily edited. This book is full of biting criticism of the failings of the human race and much too grown up for the average child.A further point of interest is that whilst most people will know of Gulliver, they will talk of his trip to Lilliput and, just possibly to a land of giants: very few people speak of the other two lands visited - a city in the sky and a land where horse-like creatures rule. It is, however, to these two that I would imagine Swift would attribute the kernel of his tale. The horse people are very close to being the first si-fi book because it is clear that Swift is creating a race totally at variance with human beings.Considering its age, the book has some remarkably prescient forecasts of modern living. I was struck by Laputa where Swift talks of language being cut and mauled in much the way that 'Text speak' does. I was also surprised by his decision to laud the Houyhnhnms to the extent whereby Gulliver is unable to settle back amongst his own kind: even today, I find myself bridling at such an attitude.If your child has some bastardised version of this tale upon his or her bookshelf, then rip it away and wait until they reach maturity: it is a crime that this book has been reduced to kiddie fodder.more
PART I. A REVIEW OF THE BOOK.[The author gives some account of the book, Gulliver’s Travels. Her first memories of Gulliver. She reads the first couple of chapters and enjoys the satire immensely. Gets to the third chapter; is surprised at the science fictional, dystopian tone, is thoroughly hit over the head with Swift’s criticism of politics and humanity, and finishes the book knowing that there is no way she has ever before been exposed to the last two voyages Gulliver undertakes.:]I have always thought of Gulliver’s Travels as primarily a story for children. This is probably due to the number of “Gulliver” cartoons and picture books I have seen over the years. However, I’m sure that what I’ve seen only deals with a simple telling of the first two of Gulliver’s voyages described in the book and that those depictions were not nearly as full of sharp, biting criticism and satire as the unabridged version of the book itself, as Gulliver’s Travels is really not a children’s story at all. I also understand why the cartoons do not delve into the third and fourth journeys described in the book as I found them to be quite dark. Lemuel Gulliver, a ship’s surgeon, tells an amusing story of traveling the world in the early 18th century and the strange lands and peoples he comes in contact with. Gulliver’s accounts are given in a matter-of-fact way and are quite detailed while lacking in emotion. Gulliver is quite gullible and humorless himself, which just adds to the satirical effect of the book. During one voyage, Gulliver is shipwrecked and awakes on the island of Lilliput, where the inhabitants are all roughly six inches tall. His time in that kingdom satirizes the ridiculousness of feuds, wars, and royal pomp and show. Likewise, on Gulliver’s second voyage he is again an oddity due to his size as he winds up in the land of the giants in Brobdingnag, where he now stands a relative six inches tall compared to the sixty foot tall inhabitants there. During his time in Brobdingnag, Gulliver explains European systems of law and government to the prince who cannot believe that such a political system could even function. On his next journey, Gulliver’s ship is overtaken by pirates and he is rescued by the people on the floating island of Laputa, peopled by philosophers and scientists who are “floating on the clouds” like the island, as they are so lost in thought they lose all sight of practicality. Gulliver travels between islands in this land and is able to meet and question great historical figures who have gone before. He also comes in contact with Struldbergs, immortal people who become miserable the longer they live. On his last expedition Gulliver washes ashore at Houyhnhnm, a land where wise and gentle but emotionless species resembles horses and wild human-like beasts are referred to as Yahoos. Gulliver is very taken with the Houyhnhnm although he sees himself as a Yahoo, whom he despises. Gulliver returns home against his will and the story ends on a very bleak note. I much prefer the amusing way in which Swift pokes fun at the inane and ridiculous elements of English society in the first two voyages to the odd, depressing images left by the last two excursions and his trip home. Well, that’s just the opinion of this Yahoo. Read the book yourself and see what you think.more
Swift's Gulliver's Travels was next. This book was a self narrated account of various travels by a man named Gulliver. Whether it be his first voyage and being ship wrecked to wake up in the world of tiny people (Lilliput) where the people had to give up a LOT of food to feed him, or how some of them wanted to kill him but didn't know what to do with his body if they did, to the world of GIANTS in the land of Brobdingnag where he was carried about in a box, how eagles fought to take him for food, how his owner, the farmer initially used him to make money by showing him off then he was owned by the queen, or when he was attacked by pirates and ending up in Laputa and Balnibarbi, or when he talked to all the historical figures in Glubbdubdrib just to find out they had lied to build themselves up, or when he went to Luggnaggians and Struldbrugs or Japan it was interesting how he used social commentary in this book. I guess that was the best part and the faciful ideas of other cultures, languages, and magnifying various aspects and governmental and occupational characteristics of people and character flaws that he saw in life. It was also interesting how he was driven to continue to travel and not stay with his family/wife so he continued to travel. He often worked as a doc aboard ship since his business failed. Overall, I would not rate this book very highly. I'd like to hear your ideas about it though and find out the things you found interesting in it. I’m sorry for being unclear in my last reply. I reread it and am embarrassed at the laziness in my writing. Basically what I was referring to was Swift’s juxtaposition of the two people groups, the Yahoos and the Houyhnhnms. The Houyhnhnms were obviously Gulliver preferred people. He seemed, at least to me, to be content with their way of life, the stability and way of going about things. He put them on a pedestal for their intelligence, ability to reason, “ethics,” etc in spite of their problems. It was clear that Gulliver did not like the Yahoo’s way of life even though he resembled them most. He was repulsed by their characteristics and behaviors even though he was criticizing humanity. I did like the concept of “Not being a people that tell things that are not” and being truthful. I really took that whole section as Swift’s own self-deception of finding a group of people being above reproach. I too think that we are smart enough to not do horrible things yet we still do. I rated it lower because it was not the childhood book I thought it was but it was fun nontheless (as an adult).more
I actually don't like many of the classics, but this is one of my favorites. It can be a little tedious to start, but once you're into it, it's a great story.more
Gulliver’s Travels written by Jonathan Swift is definitely one of the most interesting yet adventurous books I have ever read. The main character, Gulliver, voyages to different places such as Lilliput, Brobdingnag, etc. Gulliver is just a normal character who enjoys and experiences many different adventures. Gulliver gets to be an enormous creature, a minuscule person, a genius among primitive beasts, and on a floating island. Here is just a brief description of the different parts of this book. In the first part of his journey, Gulliver is taken captive by Lilliputians on the land of Lilliput; he is considered a giant to the Lilliputians. This part is personally my favorite part because it is a very well-known tale to me and probably the most humorous, entertaining part of the whole book. In the second part of his journey, Gulliver lands on the land of Brobdinghag where the people are roughly twelve times bigger than Gulliver (everything in Brobdingnag is twelve times larger). The third part of the journey introduces the reader to the flying island of Laputa. In the last part of the book, Gulliver travels to the country of the Houyhnhnms (Houyhnhnms are horses who rule the country). Though this is a great book I suggest having a dictionary by your side when reading this book because the text can be very challenging and sometimes confusing. Swift’s creativity and imagination is quite remarkable in this novel and a one of a kind novel filled with a variety adventures. I recommended this book to readers who enjoy adventures, classic novels and literatures.more
I had a picture book version of this as a child, which I loved and which became suitably dog-eared over time. The grown-up version is equally delicious, and just the most perfect form of adventure. I must admit I can’t understand why you’d ever go to sea again after going to Lilliput, because I think I would be truly apprehensive, but there’s an adventurous spirit at work in this book that you don’t often see in literature. I read this very quickly, because I found it engrossing and the exploits grew increasingly, well, a little bit strange... definitely one to read!more
One of the most remarkable books in the English language. Swift dissects, shrinks, magnifies and distorts the world around him, and invites us along to witness the results through the eyes of Lemuel Gulliver, who -for deviation from planned routes- must rank among the world's unluckiest travellers. It is a great story, a great satire, and a book that rewards repeated readings.more
A very well-known tale this one. Especially his first travel to Lilliput. The fantasy of the tale is fantastic. But that could be told in a hundred pages. But this is not really a work of fiction, it was written as a political satire, so Swift writes a great deal about human nature and how bad it is performing. Which is far less eye-pleasing.more
I thought this was an okay book. I understand what Swift was trying to accomplish with his 4 different worlds--the lessons he was trying to teach--but I wasn't that engaged with the stories. There were some interesting bits of writing, but overall, just one of those classics I felt I needed to read to be a well-rounded person. Yes, I am much rounder now but it has nothing to do with this book.more
This is no child's book, but a fantastic display of satire and political statement. I laughed to the point of tears several times after reading how Mr. Gulliver chose to distinguish the palace fire in Lilliput. Highly recommended.more
Was Glubbdubdrib on J.K. Rowling's mind when she envisaged Hogwarts? Swift's deadpan satire is a treat, but so is his earnest advocacy of freedom.more
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