The Fall of the House of Usher
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The Fall of the House of Usher is a gothic novel by Edgar Allan Poe. The story tells of a mysterious house and an unnamed narrator's horrific experience with it.
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Publicado: Xist Publishing el
ISBN: 9781623958275
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The Fall of the House of Usher - Edgar Allan Poe

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THE FALL OF

THE HOUSE OF USHER

BY

EDGAR ALLAN POE

Xist Publishing

TUSTIN, CA

ISBN: 978-1-62395-827-5

This edition published in 2015 by Xist Publishing

PO Box 61593

Irvine, CA 92602

www.xist publishing.com

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The Fall of the House of Usher/ Edgar Allen Poe

ISBN 978-1-62395-827-5

DURING the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens, I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country, and at length found myself, as the shades of the evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher. I know not how it was—but, with the first glimpse of the building, a sense of insufferable gloom pervaded my spirit. I say insufferable; for the feeling was unrelieved by any of that half-pleasurable, because poetic, sentiment, with which the mind usually receives even the sternest natural images of the desolate or terrible. I looked upon the scene before me—upon the mere house, and the simple landscape features of the domain—upon the bleak walls—upon the vacant eye-like windows—upon a few rank sedges—and upon a few white trunks of decayed trees—with an utter depression of soul which I can compare to no earthly sensation more properly than to the after-dream of the reveller upon opium—the bitter lapse into every-day life—the hideous dropping off of the veil. There was an iciness, a sinking, a sickening of the heart—an unredeemed dreariness of thought which no goading of the imagination could torture into aught of the sublime. What was it—I paused to think—what was it that so unnerved me in the contemplation of the House of Usher? It was a mystery all insoluble; nor could I grapple with the shadowy fancies that crowded upon me as I pondered. I was forced to fall back upon the unsatisfactory conclusion, that while, beyond doubt, there are combinations of