Billiards: Miscellaneous Strokes by W. Broadfoot - Read Online
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Major W. Broadfoot describes a variety of strokes many of which may be played in different ways, according to the position which it is desired to leave.
The number of such strokes which may be set up on the table is infinite, whilst the examples here given are necessarily few. They have, as in other cases, been selected after much thought, and being in some instances strokes commonly met with in a game, similar diagrams will be found in other books on billiards. Yet this does not involve plagiarism, for in many instances repetition cannot be avoided, as will be apparent when the spot stroke is described.
Endeavour has been made to give examples which may readily be varied at the will of the player, and so that slavish adherence to the measurements given may be unnecessary. This is important, for not only do tables vary slightly in make, but persons vary the manner of measuring. The diagrams, as before, must simply be considered approximate, but are, it is hoped, sufficiently correct and intelligible to enable a careful reader to set up the strokes when disposed for practice.
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ISBN: 9781446549889
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Strokes

MISCELLANEOUS STROKES

Unber the above heading it is proposed to describe a variety of strokes many of which may be played in different ways, according to the position which it is desired to leave. Some of these are genuine strokes, whether plain or whether rotation is applied; others partake rather of the nature of tricks, but as they do not contravene existing rules they must be treated as legitimate, and their effect on the game is so important that they must not be neglected in any manual. Following strokes belong to the former class, and are of much importance to the game; the principle involved in playing them was explained in the last chapter. The number of such strokes which may be set up on the table is infinite, whilst the examples here given are necessarily few. They have, as in other cases, been selected after much thought, and being in some instances strokes commonly met with in a game, similar diagrams will be found in other books on billiards. Yet this does not involve plagiarism, for in many instances repetition cannot be avoided, as will be apparent when the spot stroke is described.

Endeavour has been made to give examples which may readily be varied at the will of the player, and so that slavish adherence to the measurements given may be unnecessary. This is important, for not only do tables vary slightly in make, but persons vary the manner of measuring. The diagrams, as before, must simply be considered approximate, but are, it is hoped, sufficiently correct and intelligible to enable a careful reader to set up the strokes when disposed for practice.

Diagram I., stroke A.

Ball 1: 34 in. from cushion 2; 23 in. from cushion 1.

Ball 2: 30½ in. from cushion 2; 37 in. from cushion 1.

Ball 3: 24½ in. from cushion 2; 50 in. from cushion 1.

Strike hall 1 one-half above the centre, a free No, 1 strength, play nearly full (between three-quarters left and full) on hall 2, and cannon gently on ball 3; ball 2 will follow the course indicated or some modification thereof, and after contact with two cushions rest near the middle pocket; ball 3 will also be driven gently in that direction, and the situation of the three balls after the stroke may be as indicated by the figures 1′, 2′, and 3′, leaving, as is evident, an excellent opportunity for further play. Played fifty times, this stroke may never result twice precisely alike; yet it is scarcely possible to make the cannon and fail to leave a good opening. That is one beauty of the stroke. Even if, as will happen occasionally, ball 1 cannons fine on ball 3 (which it may easily do in a slight variation in the stroke) and runs into the pocket, ball 2 comes up from the bottom cushion and there is a fair chance of scoring from baulk. There may, of course, sometimes be an unlucky leave, but if the stroke be played with freedom this will rarely happen. The general fault made in all following strokes is to play too fine on ball 2, specially when some strength is used; hence it is prudent to play what seems to be rather too full. This should never be forgotten; ten strokes are missed because they are played too fine for one that fails because it was played too full.

Another set of measurements which may be substituted for those given, and which will exhibit a somewhat similar stroke, are here appended. They are taken from the same cushions,