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The treaties of Bartolomé de las Casas are arguments in favor of the Indians; the best known of these, Brevísima relación de la destrucción de las Indias, was not published until 1552. Along with passages like the above, with passionate descriptions of the New World, Bartolomé de las Casas reflects on the Conquest and its aftermath. 
Published: Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9788498970203
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On the list of humanity's infliction of cruelty upon itself, the Spanish conquest ranks not far behind the Holocaust. The Aztecs and Incans are most frequently cited, but many other peoples were vanquished as well by gold-mongering conquistadors who didn't give a moment's thought to the inhumanity they were perpetrating on these "savages". It's only thanks to the regret of missionaries who lost conversion opportunities to these opportunists that we have this eyewitness account. The author frequently says he cannot bring himself to catalog in full the atrocities, only listing a few highlighted examples. He does not identify the Spaniards he charges by name, whether by choice or perhaps these were removed from the public account. It is a difficult, uncomfortable litany, and even the postscript adds little in the way of restitution, indicating that although the Spanish king responded to this account by enacting new measures, these were largely disregarded as they could not well be enforced. For posterity's sake I'm glad to have read this. For a more personal illumination of one part of the story, I'd recommend Gary Jenning's historical novel "Aztec" which was my personal impetus for reading this non-fiction work.more
Casas wrote this partly out of a very human concern for the lives of others, and partly from his own convictions and his sense of faith - he was convinced that God would punish the Kingdom of Spain for its sins unless something was done.

A retelling of wars, atrocities, tortures, exterminations, enslavement, and so forth in the 16th century in Cuba, Hispaniola, Mexico, Colombia. With contemporary illustrations! The main motives seem to be covered by greed for gold, deception with religion, or just cruelty.

This is also an early modern instance of atrocity being used as political propaganda, with Protestant nations such as England circulating this document as proof of Catholic depravity and corruption, and later historians attempting to white-wash (pardon the hideous pun) Spain's history, especially under the Franco regime. I recall another edition of the book being republished just in time for the Spanish-American War.

Although the majority of the Native American depopulation was likely carried out by disease, and some events appear to be exaggerated, this does not detract too much from de las Casas' frightening message. He saw terrible things happening and wanted to do something about it. It is this reason, and his being a lone voice in the wilderness, are why he endures.more
If only even a quarter of this book is true, then the human race is truly to be pitied. I'm sure that most of it is indeed factual, and that is the sad part. Some people think that the New World just came into existence magically and that no one was living here prior. This book sheds some light as to what really happened and just how inhumane some people can be.more
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On the list of humanity's infliction of cruelty upon itself, the Spanish conquest ranks not far behind the Holocaust. The Aztecs and Incans are most frequently cited, but many other peoples were vanquished as well by gold-mongering conquistadors who didn't give a moment's thought to the inhumanity they were perpetrating on these "savages". It's only thanks to the regret of missionaries who lost conversion opportunities to these opportunists that we have this eyewitness account. The author frequently says he cannot bring himself to catalog in full the atrocities, only listing a few highlighted examples. He does not identify the Spaniards he charges by name, whether by choice or perhaps these were removed from the public account. It is a difficult, uncomfortable litany, and even the postscript adds little in the way of restitution, indicating that although the Spanish king responded to this account by enacting new measures, these were largely disregarded as they could not well be enforced. For posterity's sake I'm glad to have read this. For a more personal illumination of one part of the story, I'd recommend Gary Jenning's historical novel "Aztec" which was my personal impetus for reading this non-fiction work.more
Casas wrote this partly out of a very human concern for the lives of others, and partly from his own convictions and his sense of faith - he was convinced that God would punish the Kingdom of Spain for its sins unless something was done.

A retelling of wars, atrocities, tortures, exterminations, enslavement, and so forth in the 16th century in Cuba, Hispaniola, Mexico, Colombia. With contemporary illustrations! The main motives seem to be covered by greed for gold, deception with religion, or just cruelty.

This is also an early modern instance of atrocity being used as political propaganda, with Protestant nations such as England circulating this document as proof of Catholic depravity and corruption, and later historians attempting to white-wash (pardon the hideous pun) Spain's history, especially under the Franco regime. I recall another edition of the book being republished just in time for the Spanish-American War.

Although the majority of the Native American depopulation was likely carried out by disease, and some events appear to be exaggerated, this does not detract too much from de las Casas' frightening message. He saw terrible things happening and wanted to do something about it. It is this reason, and his being a lone voice in the wilderness, are why he endures.more
If only even a quarter of this book is true, then the human race is truly to be pitied. I'm sure that most of it is indeed factual, and that is the sad part. Some people think that the New World just came into existence magically and that no one was living here prior. This book sheds some light as to what really happened and just how inhumane some people can be.more
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