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No adventure in history carries more significance than that of the Santa María crossing the Atlantic in 1492. Diario de a bordo tells the story of Colón's expedition, from securing financing from the Spanish Monarchy to the crossing of an ocean. In it, Colón's character is revealed as both a passionate explorer, a wealth obsessed conqueror, and a visionary navigator.
Published: Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9788498169430
List price: $3.00
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Very brief, easy to read, great for young readers or the classroom. The pictures are well done and a good conversation point, along with the maps and woodcuts.more
This translation is mainly directed at sailors who would like to follow Columbus's course, and its coverage of the debates over Columbus's first landfall and the course of his first voyage is thorough and interesting. The text of the log, however, is unreliable and tampers with the Spanish sources, although at least the most blatant instances of tampering are usually mentioned in a footnote. The style is perhaps too casual, and the approach to Columbus himself is unabashedly hero-worshiping. I'm finding the appendices to be the best parts of the book. One contains an abridged reprint of Gustavus V. Fox's case for Samana Cay as Columbus's "San Salvador." Robert H. Fuson is an academic geographer with a military background.more

Reviews

Very brief, easy to read, great for young readers or the classroom. The pictures are well done and a good conversation point, along with the maps and woodcuts.more
This translation is mainly directed at sailors who would like to follow Columbus's course, and its coverage of the debates over Columbus's first landfall and the course of his first voyage is thorough and interesting. The text of the log, however, is unreliable and tampers with the Spanish sources, although at least the most blatant instances of tampering are usually mentioned in a footnote. The style is perhaps too casual, and the approach to Columbus himself is unabashedly hero-worshiping. I'm finding the appendices to be the best parts of the book. One contains an abridged reprint of Gustavus V. Fox's case for Samana Cay as Columbus's "San Salvador." Robert H. Fuson is an academic geographer with a military background.more
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