Del editor

A great modern classic and the prelude to The Lord of the Rings.   Bilbo Baggins is a hobbit who enjoys a comfortable, unambitious life, rarely traveling any farther than his pantry or cellar. But his contentment is disturbed when the wizard Gandalf and a company of dwarves arrive on his doorstep one day to whisk him away on an adventure. They have launched a plot to raid the treasure hoard guarded by Smaug the Magnificent, a large and very dangerous dragon. Bilbo reluctantly joins their quest, unaware that on his journey to the Lonely Mountain he will encounter both a magic ring and a frightening creature known as Gollum.

“A glorious account of a magnificent adventure, filled with suspense and seasoned with a quiet humor that is irresistible . . . All those, young or old, who love a fine adventurous tale, beautifully told, will take The Hobbit to their hearts.” – New York Times Book Review

Temas: Elves, Dwarves, Wizards, Journeys, Friendship, Adventurous, Dark, Inklings, y Series

Publicado: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt una impresión de Houghton Mifflin Harcourt el
ISBN: 9780547951973
Enumerar precios: $13.95
Leer en Scribd móvil: iPhone, iPad y Android.
Disponibilidad de The Hobbit
Con una prueba gratuita de 30 días usted puede leer en línea gratis
  1. Este libro se puede leer en hasta 6 dispositivos móviles.

Artículos relacionados

Literary Hub
6 min leídos

On the Accidental Origins of Beloved Books

This week marks the 73rd anniversary of the time Astrid Lindgren, mother of two, fell down and sprained her ankle and decided well, why not spend the time she was laid up writing down the stories she’d been telling her ten-year-old daughter? It was in this way that the literary classic Pippi Longstocking was born. Which led me to wonder—what other random or accidental events contributed to the writing of other classic books? After all, we usually think of book-writing as a planned (perhaps even plotted) endeavor. Books may be inspired by one random thing or other, but that doesn’t necessarily
The Atlantic
8 min leídos
Psychology

The Best Writing Advice of 2016

2016 was not an easy year to be a writer. Not just because of the constant, concentration-wrecking pull of our devices, their glowing screens beckoning with the promise of fresh horrors. I’ve spoken with many writers, in recent months, who seem to be facing a deeper, starker crisis of purpose since the election of Donald Trump. They’re asking themselves: Is making literature an acceptable pursuit in a world with such urgent, tangible needs? And if so, how should I use my words? It’s a deeply personal line of questioning, and I can’t supply any answers here—I’m still working things out for myse
TIME
2 min leídos

When Less Plot Is Actually More

AFTER WRITING SEVEN NOVELS AND three works of nonfiction, acclaimed British author Rachel Cusk began to find fiction “fake and embarrassing.” Two years ago, she explained to a British newspaper, “Once you have suffered sufficiently, the idea of making up John and Jane and having them do things together seems utterly ridiculous.” No surprise, then, that her 2014 novel Outline was anything but plot-driven. It was more like a series of observations by a narrator as she traveled to Greece to teach writing. The people she met along the way essentially became the subjects of miniature profiles craf