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Ivy and Bean Bundle Set 3 (Books 7-9)

Ivy and Bean Bundle Set 3 (Books 7-9)

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Ivy and Bean Bundle Set 3 (Books 7-9)

valoraciones:
4/5 (51 valoraciones)
Longitud:
287 página
1 hora
Publicado:
Sep 24, 2013
ISBN:
9781452133614
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

New York Times best-selling series of books for children — Ivy + Bean

Ivy and Bean, two friends who never meant to like each other: This boxed set, Ivy and Bean Boxed Set: Books 7-9 continues the story of these two spunky characters. It includes the third of three books in the Ivy and Bean series.

Author Annie Barrows talks about her award-winning Ivy + Bean series: One of the big problems of being a kid is that your parents often try to make you play with people you don’t really like. My parents were forever trying to get me to like the kids of their friends. These kids were often weird. I didn’t want to play with them. It was a problem.

Ivy and Bean are very different: Bean is loud and wild and goofy. She loves to be involved in games and poke her nose in other people’s business. Ivy is quiet and full of ideas. She spends most of her time learning how to be a witch. Each girl thinks the other one is weird. Each girl thinks she could never be friends with the other. Especially because their parents keep nagging them about it. But sometimes opposites can become the best of friends because they’re opposites.

Ivy and Bean Boxed Set: Books 7-9 includes:

  • Book 7: Ivy + Bean: What’s the Big Idea? Wouldn’t it be cool if Ivy and Bean found the solution to global warming? Wouldn’t it be especially cool if the solution was shimmering pink goo in a test-tube and all the famous scientists in the world wished they had thought of it first? It’s Science Fair time at Emerson School, and all the kids are supposed to find a way to cool down the earth. Some kids are planting trees. Some kids are holding their breath for a very, very long time. Some kids are doing interesting things with vacuum cleaners. But what should Ivy and Bean do? Something with explosions? Something with ropes? Something with ice cubes? Or maybe something very, very quiet . . .
  • Book 8: Ivy + Bean: No News Is Good News: Ivy and Bean need some money. Ten dollars, to be exact. Never mind what for. Don’t even ask. Okay, it’s for cheese. Two bags of lowfat Belldeloon cheese in a special just-for-you serving size. Don’t ask why. But ten dollars is a lot of money. How are Bean and Ivy going to make ten dollars? Should they babysit? Eww, diapers. No. Should they wash the car? They’re not allowed to touch the car. No. Should they write a newspaper about their neighbors and sell it? Yes. Great idea—and easy too! All Ivy and Bean have to do is snoop around Pancake Court and gets some news. It’s very interesting what you can find out if you look in your neighbors’ windows. It’s even more interesting when the neighbors read about it in the newspaper.
  • Book 9: Ivy + Bean Make the Rules: It’s Spring Break, and Bean’s older sister, Nancy, is going to Girl Power 4-Ever Camp, where she will do Crafts and Dance and First Aid and other secret things that Bean will never know about because you have to be eleven to go to Girl Power 4-Ever Camp. Bean doesn’t care. She doesn’t want to go to camp. She wouldn’t go even if they begged her. So ha. So ha ha. So—wait a second! Bean and Ivy can make their own camp, their own better camp. It’s Camp Flaming Arrow, where Crafts include escaping, Dance includes thumbtacks, First Aid includes zombies, and counselors Ivy and Bean make the rules.

If you and your child liked Junie B. Jones, Magic Tree House books, and Princess in Black; you'll love Ivy & Bean.
Publicado:
Sep 24, 2013
ISBN:
9781452133614
Formato:
Libro

Sobre el autor

Annie Barrows was an editor at Chronicle Books before becoming a full time writer. She has written several adult titles including the New York Times bestseller The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, as well as the highly acclaimed children's series Ivy and Bean and The Magic Half. Annie lives in Northern California with her husband and two daughters. www.anniebarrows.com

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Ivy and Bean Bundle Set 3 (Books 7-9) - Annie Barrows

CONTENTS

IVY & BEAN BOOK 7

BEAN GETS ANTSY 7

JUST DESERTS 17

HOT AND BOTHERED 29

ICEBOUND! 40

NO MOLD, NO BODY PARTS 55

SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST 66

RICE AND BEAN 81

GRAND SLAM 89

SCIENTIFIC PRINCIPALS 101

HAPPY ENDING 115

AFTERWORD: WHY CAN’T WE JUST THROW ICE CUBES IN THE AIR? 123

IVY & BEAN BOOK 8

SQUISH, SQUISH, SQUISH 7

A CHEESY SUGGESTION 16

OUT OF BUSINESS 24

BREAKING THE NEWS 32

WHAT A DEAL! 45

BAD NEWS 56

RATS! SALAMI! WOW! 66

GUESS THE NAKED BABY 74

A HOT STORY 83

FACING THE MUSIC 94

THE PANCAKE FLIPS 104

THE WHOLE BALL OF WAX 116

IVY & BEAN BOOK 9

NEVER 4-EVER 7

UN-MAGIC TREE HOUSE 18

CAMP FLAMING ARROW HITS THE SPOT 29

VERY CRAFTY 39

HAPPY CAMPERS 52

MONKEY PARK GONE WILD 63

TAPPETTYTAPTAP! 82

ZOMBIE PROBLEM IN MONKEY PARK 93

THE QUEEN’S GARBAGE 102

4-EVER AFTER 118

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

For all children’s librarians everywhere, but especially for Mrs. Jean Merian —A. B.

For Leah Brunski, a remarkable teacher —S. B.

Special thanks to Sean Fottrell for information about the science of global warming.

First paperback edition published in 2011 by Chronicle Books LLC.

Text © 2010 by Annie Barrows.

Illustrations © 2010 by Sophie Blackall.

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher.

ISBN 978-1-4521-0236-8 (PB)

ISBN 978-0-8118-7976-7 (EPUB, MOBI)

The Library of Congress has cataloged the hardcover edition as follows:

Barrows, Annie.

Ivy + Bean what’s the big idea? / written by Annie Barrows ; illustrated by Sophie Blackall.

p. cm. — (Ivy + Bean ; bk. 7)

Summary: When all the second grade students must enter the science fair, which has global

warming as its theme, best friends Ivy and Bean team up to create an unusual project.

ISBN 978-0-8118-6692-7

[1. Science projects—Fiction. 2. Science fairs—Fiction. 3. Schools—Fiction.] I. Blackall,

Sophie, ill. II. Title. III. Title: Ivy and Bean what’s the big idea? IV. Series.

PZ7.B27576Iwbh 2010

[Fic]—dc22

2010008258

Series design by Sara Gillingham.

Book design by Sara Gillingham.

Typeset in Blockhead and Candida.

The illustrations in this book were rendered in Chinese ink.

Chronicle Books LLC

680 Second Street, San Francisco, California 94107

www.chroniclekids.com

BEAN GETS ANTSY

There had been a problem in Bean’s house. The problem was staples. Bean loved staples. She loved them so much that she had stapled things that weren’t supposed to be stapled. The things looked better stapled, but her mother didn’t think so, and now Bean was outside.

She was going to be outside for a long time.

She looked at her backyard. Same old yard, same old trampoline, same old dinky plastic playhouse, same old pile of buckets and ropes and stilts. None of them was any fun. Maybe she could play junkyard crash. Junkyard crash was when you stacked up all the stuff you could find and then drove the toy car into the stack. But it was no fun alone. Bean got up and scuffed across the nice green lawn until she reached the not- so-nice green lawn. This part of Bean’s lawn had holes and lumps in it. The lumps were mostly places where Bean had buried treasure for kids of the future.

Bean picked up a shovel. To heck with kids of the future. She was bored now. And maybe a secret admirer had added something interesting to her treasure, like a ruby skull or a dinosaur egg.

Bean didn’t bury her treasure very deep, so it was easy to dig up. This treasure was inside a paper bag, but the paper bag wasn’t doing so well. It wasn’t really a paper bag anymore. Holy moly! Bean said loudly. I’ve found treasure! She pulled the clumps of paper apart. What a disappointment. No ruby skull. No dinosaur egg. Just the same stuff she had buried two weeks ago: dental floss, tweezers, and a magnifying glass. Some treasure.

Bean flopped over on her stomach. I’m dying of boredom, she moaned, hoping her mother would hear, I’m dyyy-ing. She coughed in a dying sort of way, huh-ACK! and then lay still. Anyone looking from the porch would think she was dead. And then that person would feel bad.

Bean lay still.

Very still.

She could hear her heart thumping.

She could feel the hairs on her arm moving.

Bean opened her eyes. There was an ant scurrying over her arm. Bean pulled the magnifying glass over and peered at the ant. Her arm was like a mountain, and the little ant was like a mountain climber, stumbling along with a tired expression on his face. Poor, hardworking ant. She knew how he felt because sometimes her parents made her go hiking. She watched as he dodged between hairs and charged down the other side of her arm toward the ground. She offered him a blade of grass to use as a slide, but that seemed to confuse him. He paused, looked anxiously right and left, and then continued on her arm. He had a plan, and he was going to stick to it. Bean watched through the magnifying glass as he scuttled into the grass, rushing along the ground between blades. He was in a big hurry. He met another ant by banging into him, but they didn’t even stop to talk. They zipped off in opposite directions.

Bean followed her ant to a patch of dry dirt. There he plunged down a hole.

Come back, whispered Bean. She liked her ant. Maybe he would come out if she poked his house. She found a thin stick and touched the top of the hole. Four ants streamed out and raced in four different directions. Bean didn’t think any of them was her ant.

Bean watched the ant hole for a long time. Ants came and went. They all seemed to know where they were going. They all seemed to have important jobs. None of them seemed to notice that they were puny little nothings compared to Bean.

Bean dragged the hose toward the ant hole. She didn’t turn the hose on. That would be mean. But she let a little bit of water dribble into the hole, and watched as the dirt erupted with ants. Thousands of ants flung themselves this way and that, racing to safety.

Help, help, whispered Bean. Flood!

The ants ran in lines away from the water. Some were holding little grains above their heads. They were the hero ants. But even the nonhero ants were busy. They were all far too busy to notice Bean watching them through the magnifying glass. To them, she was like a planet. She wasn’t part of their world. She was too big and too far away for them to see.

Bean looked up into the sky. What if someone was watching her through a giant magnifying glass and thinking the same thing she was? What if she was as small as an ant compared to that someone? And what if that someone was an ant compared to the next world after that?

Wow.

Bean waved at the sky. Hi out there, she thought.

JUST DESERTS

Criss-cross applesauce, boys and girls, said Ms. Aruba-Tate.

Along with the rest of the second graders, Bean criss-cross applesauced. Then she sat on her hands for good measure. Rug time was tough. It was the rug. The rug had a map of the United States of America on it. Each day at rug time, all the second graders rushed to sit on Colorado. Colorado was the best state because it had the Rocky Mountains in it. That meant whoever sat on Colorado got to yell I rock!

Bean was in Iowa. She didn’t rock. She could rock. She could lean way over, push Vanessa a tiny little bit, slap the corner of Colorado, and say I rock! But then Ms. Aruba-Tate would get mad. Bean knew that from experience. So Bean sat on her hands. Next door, in South Dakota, Ivy was trying to cross one eye without crossing the other. She had been trying all day. She didn’t care much about Colorado. Once, she sat on it without even noticing.

Bean decided to pay attention to what Ms. Aruba-Tate was saying. Today, class, we are having a special science lesson. Science! Bean stopped thinking about Colorado. Science was usually dirt or fish, and Bean liked both of them. But now, Ms. Aruba-Tate went on, A team of scientists from the fifth grade will be presenting a report on global warming. And what do I expect from you, class?

Respectful listening, everyone answered. Almost everyone. MacAdam was pulling nubbies out of the rug, and he didn’t say anything.

Bean said it, but she

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  • (3/5)
    looks very sneaky and mischevias but funny.
  • (4/5)
    Cute. I enjoyed watching the girls finding a way to work out their mistake in a fairly responsible manner that didn't leave them humiliated.
  • (4/5)
    Great series of chapter books to read aloud to young ones. I took the opportunity to read aloud to a girl I nanny for, and she kept asking for more! The chapters aren't too long so you can read for 15 min before bed, or an afternoon read as well. I love the interaction between Ivy and Bean, and their families.
  • (4/5)
    Very enjoyable. Head and shoulders above lots of other school / friend/ family stories. Reminds me a bit of the Ramona books.
  • (3/5)
    When her classroom teacher, Ms. Aruba-Tate, gives her a copy of The Amazing Book of World Records during a "Drop Everything and Read" session, second-grader Bean, together with her best friend Ivy, is soon involved in an effort to become a world record holder in... something. Attempting to hold hundreds of straws in her mouth, or to break a glass figurine (pilfered from her older sister Nancy's collection) by singing brings little success, however, so Bean, influenced by Ivy's current obsession with Mary Anning, sets her sights on becoming the world's youngest paleontologist. Finding some old bones buried in the back yard, the two friends become convinced that they have unearthed a dinosaur, and spread the news far and wide...I really enjoyed this third entry in author Annie Barrows and illustrator Sophie Blackall's series of chapter-books devoted to the (mis)adventures of best friends Ivy and Bean. Once again the text and artwork captured the very different personalities of the two girls, while delivering an engaging story that was humorous, and sometimes quite thought-provoking. There's this lovely little scene, about halfway through, when Ivy and Bean are discussing being right, and whether or not it matters if others know you are right:"I want other people to know I'm right. Especially when I really am right."Ivy thought for a moment. "But you're still right, even if they don't think so.""I guess." Bean sighed. "I just feel better if other people think I'm right too.""Hardly anybody ever thinks I'm right," said Ivy.Bean nodded. That was true. A lot of people didn't understand Ivy's ideas. She had had plenty of practice at not being believed. That's probably why she didn't get as mad about it as Bean did. She just went ahead with her ides anyway. You can do whatever you want if you don't care what people think, Bean realized. But you have to do it alone a lot of the time.Quite a little philosophical interlude to work in to a beginning chapter-book - especially one that operates as a humorous story, at the surface level! I was also quite charmed by Ivy's Mary Anning obsession here, since we recently read a children's biography of Anning, for The Picture-Book Clubto which I belong. Good to know that young readers will learn who she was, through this entertaining story. Finally, given the fact that Bean can be somewhat mean-spirited, I really appreciated the fact that she admits (mostly), in a scene toward to the end of the book, that she is wrong: Bean sucked in her breath. She knew what she had to say. "You were right and we were wrong," she said. "Probably."All in all, a worthy addition to the Ivy and Bean series, one I would recommend to any chapter-book reader who enjoyed the first two.
  • (3/5)
    My favorite one of the series so far. My daughter was really into the world record theme and the idea of being a paleontologist! Lots of discussions around this book!
  • (4/5)
    This is a delightful easy chapter book about two very good friends Ivy and Bean. They are in second grade. Their teacher shares a book about breaking records so the girls get the idea to break their own record. After lots of stops and starts they decide to dig for dinosaur bones become the youngest paleontologists. They start digging in Bean’s backyard and find bones! What a surprise. They can’t wait to tell their class and then do a show and tell in their backyard. But what happens when they realize that the bones they find don’t belong to a dinosaur? This is a funny and engaging read that will be enjoyable for students who want to start chapter books.