Think You're Smart? #2 by Clic Books by Clic Books - Read Online
Think You're Smart? #2
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This is the second book in the THINK YOU'RE SMART? quiz book series.

Think you're smart? Test yourself with these simple but intelligent quizzes, packed with fun facts and trivia. Each general knowledge quiz is arranged as a 'click-through' trivia quiz, with a question on one page and the answer on the following page, perfect for testing your general knowledge. The same quizzes are then given again, this time laid out in the traditional way, with all the questions for each quiz test followed by all the answers, ideal for a pub quiz or quiz night.

However you like your brain-teasers, test yourself against the THINK YOU'RE SMART? general knowledge quizzes and see how you do...

The following categories for quiz questions are used:

THE MODERN WORLD
ENTERTAINMENT
THE HUMAN BODY
COUNTRIES & CULTURES
SPORTS, GAMES & HOBBIES
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
FAMOUS PEOPLE
THE ANCIENT WORLD
ROCK & POP
U.S.A. FACTS
AMERICAN HISTORY
WORLD HISTORY
FILM & TV
MYTHS AND FOLKLORE
QUOTATIONS
NATURE
BRITISH HISTORY
FOOD & DRINK
ART & MUSIC
RELIGIONS & CULTURES
MISCELLANEOUS
ASTRONOMY
GEOGRAPHY
LANGUAGE
CULTURE
GEOGRAPHY
BOOKS & WRITERS

Good luck!

Publicado: Clic-books Digital Media on
ISBN: 9781498972109
Enumerar precios: $2.99
Disponibilidad de Think You're Smart? #2: THINK YOU'RE SMART? Quiz Books, #2
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Copyright

THINK YOU’RE SMART #2 is published by Clic-book Digital Media.

Copyright © Clic-book Digital Media.

Cover: © Steve Warren.

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced by any means, or transmitted or translated into a machine language, without the written permission of the authors.

Introduction

There are forty general knowledge quizzes in this book.

In PART ONE, the questions are given individually, one on each page, with the answer on the following page. This is so you can ‘click’ your way through the quizzes, one question at a time, and immediately see the answers.

PART TWO presents the same forty quizzes in a more traditional way, with the questions of each quiz listed together, followed by a list of the answers. Use these if you are organising a quiz with friends or holding a pub quiz.

Either way, we hope you enjoy testing you knowledge. And remember, nobody knows ’em all!

PART ONE

QUIZ 1

1 AMERICAN HISTORY

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An affair with which White House intern led to the (unsuccessful) impeachment of President Bill Clinton in 1998?

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Monica Lewinsky.

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2 FAMOUS PEOPLE

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Which pioneering American record producer, famous for his ‘wall of sound’ technique, is currently serving a 19-year prison sentence for murder?

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Phil Spector.

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3 QUOTATIONS

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Great minds discuss ideas. Average minds discuss events. Small minds discuss people. Which influential First Lady of the USA said this?

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Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962).

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4 WORLD HISTORY

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In 1941, during the Second World War, Germany launched Operation Barbarossa, but against which country?

The Soviet Union.

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5 BOOKS & WRITERS

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How many does a sonnet typically have?

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14.

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6 CULTURE

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In which play by William Shakespeare do witches say the following lines: Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble?

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Macbeth (Act IV, Scene I).

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7 GEOGRAPHY

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Which military and political leader played a pivotal role in the struggle of Latin America for independence from the Spanish Empire, leading Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia to independence?

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Simón Bolívar (1783-1830).

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8 THE MODERN WORLD

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Which capital city is said to have the greatest number of museums?

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Mexico City, with at least 128 museums.

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9 FAMOUS PEOPLE

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Born Stanley Kirk Burrell, which influential rapper of the 1980s and 90s sold over 50 millions records, before turning to religion and becoming a preacher in the late 1990s?

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M.C. Hammer.

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10 FOOD & DRINK

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‘Fish and chips’ is one of the most popular meals in the UK. What kinds of fish are normally used?

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Atlantic cod or haddock. A common accompaniment is mushy peas.

QUIZ 2

1 BRITISH HISTORY

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Which British princess was killed in a road accident in Paris on the 31st of August, 1997?

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Diana, Princess of Wales.

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2 GEOGRAPHY

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The Aurora Borealis, also known as the ‘Northern Lights’, is a natural light display seen close to the Arctic, caused by the collision of atoms and highly charged particles in the atmosphere. What is the name of the similar phenomenon in the southern hemisphere?

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The Aurora Australis (or ‘Southern Lights’).

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3 U.S.A. FACTS

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Who would you be phoning if you dialled the telephone number 202-456-1111 in the USA?

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The President. It’s the phone number of the White House.

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4 THE HUMAN BODY

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The ‘scapula’ can be found in which part of the body?

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The shoulder blade.

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5 LANGUAGE

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Pīnyīn is a system of transcribing the sounds of which language into the Western, Latin-based alphabet?

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Chinese. Originally developed by the Chinese government in the 1950s, it was accepted by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in 1982, and is now the accepted way of writing modern Chinese using western characters.

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6 GEOGRAPHY

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Canberra is the capital city of which country?

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Australia. It is only the eighth-largest city in Australia, and was chosen as the capital because the rivalry between Sydney and Melbourne (the two largest cities) could not be resolved.

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7 RELIGIONS & CULTURES

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Jorge Mario Bergoglio (born 1936) is better known as which religious leader?

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The Pope. Taking the papal name Francis, he is the 266th and current Pope of the Catholic Church (as of 2014). His name is in honour of Saint Francis of Assisi.

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8 SPORTS, GAMES & HOBBIES

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What sport is run over distances measured in ‘furlongs’?

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Horse racing, specifically ‘flat’ racing (without any jumping of obstacles). A furlong measures 220 yards (201 metres).

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9 ROCK & POP

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The bands Duran Duran, Spandau Ballet and Culture Club were all part of the ‘new romantic’ movement in the 1980s, in which country?

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The UK.

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10 SPORTS, GAMES & HOBBIES

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A normal dartboard has how many separate sections in which a dart can score points?

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82. Each number, of which there are twenty, has two normal scoring sections plus a double points section and a treble points section. In addition, the middle of the board (the ‘bull’s eye’) scores 50 points and the immediately surrounding section scores 25 points.

QUIZ 3

1 FILM & TV

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The TV drama House, about a drug-addicted doctor (Dr. House) and his clean-living colleague (Dr. Wilson) is based loosely on which fictional detectives from the late nineteenth century?

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Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson, the creation of British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

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2 QUOTATIONS

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I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it. Which French writer of the 18th century is normally attributed with this sentence?

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Voltaire (1694-1778). In fact, the phrase is from a book about Voltaire by Evelyn Beatrice Hall published in 1906; Voltaire never said or wrote this, ‘his’ most famous phrase.

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3 MISCELLANEOUS

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What does a cooper traditionally make?

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Wooden barrels and casks. In the past, coopers also made buckets.

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4 ART & MUSIC

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Which artist is said to have had a ‘blue period’?

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Pablo Picasso. Between 1901 and 1904 his paintings were generally sombre in tone, painted in blues and greens, with very little warmth. Works from this period were often inspired by his native Spain.

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5 ROCK & POP

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The Next Day, released in January 2013, is the 24th album of which English artist?

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David Bowie. The album reached either No. 1 or No. 2 in more than twenty countries, including the US and the UK.

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6 FOOD & DRINK

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What is malt and how is it made?

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Malt is made from cereal grain that has been soaked with water and allowed to germinate. Hot air then stops the germination part-way through the process, but not before the grain’s starches have been turned into sugars.

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7 U.S.A. FACTS

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Where is the world’s largest cinema?

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Detroit; the Fox Theater. There are 5,048 seats (5,174 when seats are put in the raised orchestra pit). It is the largest surviving movie palace from the 1920s and the largest of all the original Fox Theatres. The Fox was fully restored in 1988.

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8 NATURE

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What bird lays its eggs in the nests of other birds?

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The cuckoo. This practice, which is not shared by all cuckoo species, is called being a ‘brood parasite’.

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9 MYTHS AND FOLKLORE

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In Greek mythology, what have the bodies and faces of women and the wings and claws of birds?

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Harpies.

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10 BOOKS & WRITERS

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Which English Romantic poet said, A thing of beauty is a joy for ever?

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John Keats (1795-1823), in his poem Endymion. The poem’s opening lines are: A thing of beauty is a joy for ever:/ Its loveliness increases;/ it will never pass into nothingness...

QUIZ 4

1 ENTERTAINMENT

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Which jazz bandleader and composer was known as the Duke?

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Edward Kennedy ‘Duke’ Ellington (1899–1974). He transcended boundaries, composing jazz-inspired music for classical orchestras and preferring the term ‘American music’ to ‘jazz’.

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2 NATURE

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Bellis perennis is more commonly known as which wild flower?

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Daisy. This flower can be eaten, both the petals and buds (in salads, for example), as well as the leaves, although they get somewhat bitter with age.

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3 MYTHS AND FOLKLORE

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What was the name of King Arthur’s sword in the legend of the Knights of the Round Table?

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Excalibur.

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4 POP & ROCK

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Who was the bass player in the Rolling Stones for 31 years, between 1962 and 1993?

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Bill Wyman. He now tours with his own band, Bill Wyman’s Rhythm Kings.

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5 THE HUMAN BODY

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What do we call the coloured part of the eye that surrounds the pupil?

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The iris. It takes its name from Iris, the Greek goddess of the rainbow.

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6 THE ANCIENT WORLD

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When Mount Vesuvius erupted in AD