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Rebelion en la granja

Rebelion en la granja

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Rebelion en la granja

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (282 valoraciones)
Longitud:
132 páginas
2 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
5 ene 2014
ISBN:
9781943387557
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

Quizá la empresa mas difícil de acometer sea la de hacernos conscientes. El mundo en que vivimos parece decididamente abocado a distraernos, a impedirle a los individuos un momento de lucidez para mirar su entorno, observar cómo funciona la sociedad. Los verdaderos poderes del visionario de Orwell radican en su capacidad para mirar no sólo los objetos, sino, principalmente, la sombra que proyectan. Rebelión en la granja es una fábula en la que la adjudicación de las aflicciones y necesidades humanas a los animales protagonista venció la resistencia racional de los primeros lectores a mirar lo que no querían mirar. Lo que nos cuenta Orwell ya estaba en los periódicos: la historia sobre los crímenes estalinistas en la Unión Soviética.

Editorial:
Publicado:
5 ene 2014
ISBN:
9781943387557
Formato:
Libro

Sobre el autor

Eric Arthur Blair (1903 – 1950), known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist and critic. His work is characterised by lucid prose, biting social criticism, opposition to totalitarianism, and outspoken support of democratic socialism.***Eric Arthur Blair (1903 – 1950), mais conhecido pelo pseudônimo George Orwell, foi um escritor, jornalista e ensaísta político inglês, nascido na Índia Britânica. Sua obra é marcada por uma inteligência perspicaz e bem-humorada, uma consciência profunda das injustiças sociais, uma intensa oposição ao totalitarismo e uma paixão pela clareza da escrita.


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Lo que piensa la gente sobre Rebelion en la granja

4.3
282 valoraciones / 232 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    No solo me pareció extraordinario en el contexto ligado a la política y al comportamiento de la sociedad, sino también en el sentido figurativo, ya que habla sobre la realidad que viven los animales en el mundo. Considero que en ambos aspectos, es sumamente asertivo.
  • (4/5)
    El libro es una alegoría sobre el proceso del totalitarismo soviético, desde sus inicios revolucionarios, pasando por la progresiva imposición de limitaciones a las libertades personales (en base a la manipulación de la información, el reclamo de la sumisión y la creación de enemigos externos imaginarios), hasta llegar a una completa y brutal dictadura basada en la corrupción y en el favoritismo político. Resulta interesante ver la claridad con que Orwell retrata el proceso, universalmente repetido una y otra vez, mediante el cual las dictaduras imponen la fuerza de su represión y el silencio del miedo.
  • (5/5)
    Lectura obligada para conocer paso a paso el desarrolllo de una sociedad totalitaria
  • (5/5)
    A classic. One of the best novels (or shall I say novella) of all time.
  • (4/5)
    Although I'm almost sure I read this as part of a required high school English class, I decided I should read it again, just in case! This book takes on a different context as an adult reader.
  • (5/5)
    Given the current focus on North Korea, this is an ideal book for most teens to read. When it seems unthinkable that an entire country can function lock-step in the whims of its leader, this book is an approachable read of that same situation that has happened over and over in history. Fear is a powerful motivator. I wish this book didn't strike potential teen readers as more of a "school assignment" type book. It is absolutely worth a read. I listened on audio, and enjoyed it, but the version I had began with a tedious lecture about Orwell that should be skipped by almost everyone.
  • (3/5)
    This book had two of George Orwell's work contained in it. Animal Farm was about the animals on the farm led by the pig population (which was the smarter of the animals) and specIfically, Major, an old boar. The animals plot to overtake the farm and throw Mr. Jones out. It is an eerie reminder what happens as history always repeats itself. Although the year 1984 has come and gone, this book was written in the 1940s as how the the future may be in 40 years. Happenings of the time, although they may have been far fetched at that time, present themselves in current life. Winston lived in the country Oceana and was governed by "Big Brother" in all his thoughts and actions. He fell in love with Julia and was forbidden to see her or talk to her. History could be changed or deleted at any time. Our lives are on tape many times a day, at a gas pump, a convenience store, an ATM, a traffic signal - just to name a few. We also have many of our "freedoms" taken from us and our actions too are controlled by "Big Brother." The end has a rather unique twist that I was totally not expecting. Both books are classics that I did not read in high school. I am glad that I took the opportunity to visit them, but likely not a "read again" sometime.
  • (5/5)
    I loved Nineteen-Eighty-Four when I read it, so I'm not sure why I never got round to reading Animal Farm. It was one of those things I heard about but didn't really hear any details about. Somewhere I heard about it being about communism, or Stalin, or something, but didn't remember where and that didn't really pique my interest...

    Well, and then I saw it on the ridiculous list of one hundred books -- or whatever it is -- that someone thinks most people will only have read six of. So I mooched it and decided to read it soon, in a spirit of defiance. Not that I wasn't doing well already, with fifty-seven books...

    Anyway. The book itself is easy to read. Easier than I was expecting, maybe. I know someone who decided to discount it because it's "about talking animals" and "no one could take that seriously". It's meant to be a fairy tale type thing, though; it's meant to reflect on the truth. It's political writing. It's perhaps less comprehensible to people who didn't live through the Cold War -- communism wasn't really that much of an issue in my life except that there were vague references to it in history class and it came up once I started doing some philosophy at university.

    I've read other reviews saying it's too easy to read, too simplistic. I'd have to agree that it can't cover all the complexities of history and politics and people. But I don't think it's meant to, I think it's meant to be a simplified, more universal version, exploring communism-going-wrong. I don't think it necessarily says that communism is impossible, either -- you have to draw that conclusion for yourself.

    The writing itself isn't stellar, I suppose, in that it doesn't light fireworks and dance and sing. It's pretty matter-of-fact and down to earth. I liked it a lot, though. I think that added to the ease of reading and understanding.
  • (4/5)
    "All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others" - Well, that pretty much sums it all up in one sentence, doesn't it?

    I was apparently one of the few I know that never read this book in high school or college, and also never studied the Russian Revolution. However, based on what I've read about it, Orwell managed to tick everyone off with his version of it, played out through the various animal characters. This book is a teacher/professor's dream of a book to discuss in class.

    The characters are so rich, so highly developed - you either want to stretch through the book and protect them to no end, or just do away with them for being such jerks! Orwell so eloquently chooses just the right animals to match their "human" counterparts. I found myself cheering for Boxer (equated on some sites as "the working peasant population") and really hating pigs in general.

    Fantastically and wonderfully surprised - I'm looking forward to reading more Orwell as a result.
  • (4/5)
    Listened to the audiobook version. I enjoyed it. I like this type of book
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book, both as a look at Communism and as a funny book with talking animals. I was either thinking of how this mirrors real life, of how much this book reminded me of the movie "Home On The Range".
  • (3/5)
    Let's get this out of the way immediately: Animal Farm is not a satire of socialism as a concept. It's clearly not. That it was ever taken as such (as I was taught in middle school) is an example of exactly what it and 1984 warned against: the dissemination of an outright lie for political purposes, believed by sheep. It's the same book 1984 is: it warns against totalitarianism, the corruption of the democratic socialist ideal that George Orwell fervently believed in. It's a critique of Stalin.

    Whew. Jeez. We'll never bother to have that debate again, okay?

    Unfortunately, it's also not a very deep book. It's blatantly manipulative. The use of animals as stand-ins is a manipulative tactic; of course you feel for the poor dumb hard-working horse. It's a lazy allegory, too; it's not like Orwell has to write an extra sentence or two to clue us in on what role a flock of sheep might play in a story.

    When you have a raven as the prophet of a false God, and then just in case you didn't get it Orwell names the Raven Moses, you are not dealing in subtlety.

    1984 is Orwell's masterpiece; it's a work of vision, daring and originality. This is the kids' version. That doesn't mean it's not valuable! Read it to your kids. You don't have to talk about totalitarianism or socialism. They'll get the message they need to without any discussion at all of imagery. It's a very nice children's book. It is not for grown-ups.

    And it's not about how Socialism doesn't work, jeez.
  • (4/5)
    Very interesting sociological treatment of the human study.
  • (5/5)
    How better to make the perils of communism accessible to younger or less politically savvy readers than through anthropomorphism. The animals on Mr. Jones’ farm decide that they are sick of ill treatment by humans, who get do none of the work and reap all of the rewards. They institute a rebellion and, what’s more, they win. The pigs, being the smartest of the animals take over leadership at the farm. Progressively though, the pigs take liberties with their power, because although all animals may be equal, some are more equal than others.
  • (4/5)
     ohh, those pigs are crafty! Set on a farm in rural England, where the animals are incited to revolt against their human masters and start to run the farm themselves. The inital dream of a rural idyll is soon eroded by the actions of the pigs, and they way the confound the other animals. They invent 7 commandments that are seen to change over time as the pigs decide to rewrite the rules in their own favour. The lies that they tell to pull the wool over the eyes of the other animals get more and more outlandish as the story progresses, to the extent of writing history to prove their point. I thought this would be difficutl to read, but it's actually quite short, about 100 pages, and isn't taxing. However, I imagine the essay that you could be set on this are probably a great deal more difficult than the source text!
  • (3/5)
    The symbolism is heavy-handed, and it really is nothing more than sixty-two pages of COMMUNISM IS CORRUPT, but it's a short read that's entertaining.
  • (5/5)
    ‘Animal Farm’ is truly an interesting story; we all know what the story represents but George Orwell portrayed communists Russia in World War II really well. The book was short and I was able to read it in one day, almost in one sitting. I think we could spend a long time discussing which animal represents which Russian and working out which battle was The Battle of the Cowshed or The Battle of the Windmill. I did especially enjoy the flag (The Horn and Hoof Flag reminiscent of the hammer and sickle), Squealer (propaganda pig) and Moses the Raven (the Russian Orthodox Church). It is definitely one of those books you need to read at least once in your lifetime. I think I enjoyed it more than ‘Nineteen Eighty Four’.
  • (5/5)
    I don't remember reading this in high school - I suppose we had choices of 'good' books and I picked something else. I put it on my list because one of the 8th grade teachers had the students read it together as a class and I was in some of the class sessions... and what I read/heard was intriguing. It only took me a day to read it, mostly because I could hardly put it down. I kept getting more and more angry at Napoleon and the things that he was doing, and then thinking about the real story behind the story.... and it made me upset. As I got closer to the end, I got more frustrated with the sad plight of the animals and more pissed off at the pigs in charge. At the finish, I was disgusted with the way the animals' lives turned out - I was really moved, and to me that makes an awesome book. I can easily see why so many people felt strongly about communism and Russia after reading this book (or hearing about it). At least, Russia is no longer under Stalin and is a lot more free than during those times.
  • (4/5)
    This is an analogy for the rise of the Soviet Union. A classic story that shows how power corrupts. It's short and to the point. Enjoyable.
  • (5/5)
    By far, one of my favorite books of all time. This satirical masterpiece infuriates me when reading it. I can't help but love the juxtaposition of humans and animals as the same thing. It screams of the rejection of Communism and other forms of totalitarian governments. In fact, I would not be surprised if this book was still banned in Russia. Overall, its bleak view of humanity and life in this cruel world can be a bit much, but also makes us think about ourselves. Do we not treat each other like animals sometimes?
  • (5/5)
    Wow. I just read this book for the first time, and I can completely understand why it's required reading in so many high school assignments. What a great explanation of politics, corruption and apathy. Sadly, much of what Orwell wrote in the 1940's, still applies today.
  • (5/5)
    Rated: A+The New Lifetime Reading Plan: Number 123aAbsolute genius. A masterpiece. Praise God that the totalitarian world that George Orwell imagined has not yet conquered our farm -- yet.
  • (5/5)
    A farm is taken over by its overworked, mistreated animals. With flaming idealism and stirring slogans, they set out to create a paradise of progress, justice, and equality. Thus the stage is set for one of the most telling satiric fables ever penned--a razor-edged fairy tale for grown ups that records the steos from revolution against tyranny to a totalitarianism just as terrible.
  • (4/5)
    As a picture of the danger Mr. Orwell saw in the Communist East, "Animal Farm" is pretty flawless. I particularly enjoyed the animals he chose to represent different roles that are filled in a tyranny. Overall, the story is depressing - humankind is so easily misled and duped and oppressed. All you need is illiteracy, suppression of free speech, and a group of people who will loudly insist on the "party line".
  • (5/5)
    An allegory using farm animals as a society experimenting with socialism, and realizing too late the mistake they have made in accepting it.
  • (5/5)
    This is nothing short of brilliant satire. This delightful read is excellent for modern, western minds to read to remind us of the many dangers of a government with few checks and balances. There are many witty ironies in this book but to me, one of the most profund is the use of animals to portray human nature. Orwell seems to have a dim view of humanity and seems to highlight the reality that humans tend to naturally be self-seeking and easily corruptible. Though this stands in stark contrast to the ideals of the Enlightenment, the WWII context for this book revealed that humans are capable yes of amazing achievements yes, but equally capable of horrific atrocities. An additional high point for this reader is the display of the power of strong rhetoric, even if it is in the form of propaganda. This book should be read by every American and I would imagine would serve to protect and preserve the ideals of a free-market democracy.
  • (3/5)
    I felt like the only adult who hadn't read this book, yet. From the comments here it looks like it was loosely based on Russian Communism. I got the communism link but did not link to actual historical characters. All-in-all, I thought it was a good quick read of "be careful what you wish for" and how quickly corruption from within can take over a supposed Utopian society.
  • (5/5)
    Im so mad that this book is so good.Do not be deceived into believing that this book's thin manor speaks of its literary wealth I never read this in Jr high or high school. I see now being in the honor English classes just meant nothing. I was forced to the torture of Steinbeck, and other sentimental wastes of paper and ink. Instead of this CLASSIC we had some Shakespeare, but sadly, it was only stories well known like romeo and Juliet and a midsummer might's dream, NEVER anything like Othello or Titus andronicus.What captivated me was the initial hint of rebellion and then the carrying out of said rebellion. The slow, methodical change from a farm for the animals by the animals into a farm of the animals for the pigs enraged me enough to read onward. I hoped that Benjamin (whom Im going to say i believe was gay) would take some gusto and rally everyone to rise up against the pigs, being just as smart if not smarter than any of them, and knowing the truth of everything. The final straw for me was not the end of the book but when ALL THE PIGS did what they did towards the end of the last chapter. (I wont give it away if you're reading the book) it pissed me off and literally had me hoping that something, anything would happen to put an end to the reign of the pigs.I wont go into the obvious and well stated political themes of the book because like i said, its obvious, and probably the reason why you are reading the book. I loved (and still love) 1984 (which if i remember correctly i read before i got into English honor classes) and now, I i will add Animal Farm to it. This should be read in EVERY English class, or better yet in every history, econ, and ploy sci class.ALL ANIMALS ARE EQUAL.
  • (4/5)
    A good socio-political commentary that may fly over the heads of some readers, but should be required reading nonetheless.
  • (4/5)
    We all know the story: the animals revolt against the humans and take over the farm. They have reason, though, as Mr. Jones is a dissolute farmer who is letting his land and animals fall to pieces. Originally, they are fueled by Major's dreams of equality among all animals, but almost as soon as the revolt is successfully concluded, the ideal of Animalism begins to go astray. The pigs, the more intelligent of the animals, usurp more and more power. After Napoleon manages to rid himself of his only real opponent - Snowball, the idealist who is really trying to apply equality and improvements for the other animals - the pigs use clever rhetoric and manipulation to place themselves as the absolute leaders and recipients of the wealth that the other animals labor so hard to produce. Eventually, the seven commandments of Animalism are reduced to one corrupted rule: All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. Of course, the story is an allegory representing Stalin and the communist party in Russia. Most of the characters in the story have a historical counterpart: Napoleon represents Stalin, Snowball is elements of Lenin and Trotsky, and Squealer is likely Molotov. Some of the animals represent groups of people; for instance, Boxer is the working proletariat, and Benjamin stands for the intellectuals who disapproved of the new regime but didn't take any action. This book is a given in the classroom, and yet somehow I never was assigned to read it. I needed to rectify this gap in my literary repertoire. I wonder if I can say I enjoyed a book that was so nihilistic. Well, I did, because it was a fascinating and well-written story. Knowing the background and most of the plot before I read it, I could focus more on the significance of the allegory and craft of the writing. The style is a narrative that is descriptive without fancy flourishes, reading like a simple recounting of historical events. The straightforward tone is undercut by the use of irony, as the narrator is telling the story from the lower animal's point of view, who accept the pigs' propaganda and excuses while the reader realizes the truth behind the lies. Also, it was a fast read, with just ten short chapters. I was surprised at the ending. Somehow, I thought the pigs were deposed at the end as a consequence of their wickedness; lo and behold, they actually consolidate their power and develop human features. Orwell had a bleak outlook for our future. Thankfully, Stalin's regime was not as indestructible as he envisioned, and the terrible future Orwell prophesied in both of his major novels has not come to pass. Nonetheless, it was an eerily accurate presentation of what Socialism had become in Russia, and books like these can only help to serve as warnings against the what-may-be of totalitarianism.