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DISPONIBLE POR PRIMERA VEZ EN EBOOK

Elogiado por la crítica, admirado por lectores de todas las edades, en escuelas y universidades de todo el país y traducido a una multitud de idiomas, La casa en Mango Street es la extraordinaria historia de Esperanza Cordero. Contado a través de una serie de viñetas —a veces desgarradoras, a veces profundamente alegres— es el relato de una niña latina que crece en un barrio de Chicago, inventando por sí misma en qué y en quién se convertirá. Pocos libros de nuestra era han conmovido a tantos lectores.
Published: Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9780345807205
List price: $8.99
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Characters: Esperanza Rachel and Nenny Marin PapaMama Alicia Setting: In a small house, racially segregated, and poor area.Theme: Every culture is different in its own way and identifying oneself.Genre: Coming of age. Summary: This book is about young adult girl who is identifying herself through her cultures and her surroundings. While living in an apartment and moving to a house, which she has always dreamed of, her move wasn’t so expected. As the house is not as fancy or beautiful as she dreamed of. Instead, the house is small and run down. The story paces through different ages of her life from being young to going through puberty. The story also gives the perspective of how she views her community, culture, and her identity. As she continues to have a negative view of where she lives, her desire lies in the goal of leaving Mango Street. Audience: Young adults and ethnically diverse students. Curriculum ties: history, learning about different ethnicities, and language. Personal response: Being born in Vietnam, my parents came over to America as refugees. This how I can relate to this book. The observations she makes of her community and culture are very interesting and critical. In the way it was written, in short paragraphs separated by detailed headings, helps the reader identify what the writer is going to describe. What I liked most about this book is how she describes herself as an avid reader and her education is what will ultimately get her out the circumstance she is in. This is very important, because it helps the read identify the importance of an education and how other cultures may view education. What I think was rough in this book, is the observation of putting some of her male figures in a bad light. But this could just be her observation of what was going on . Overall, I enjoyed reading the book and it is very good to see such a book that exposes the experiences of a not so well-off ethnically diverse family.more
"The House on Mango Street", by Sandra Cisneros was in my opinion one of the most influential books that I have ever read before. Although the easy read and simple structured language did startle me at first, I was able to then find and concentrate on the beauty within the book. Esperanza's narrations within the story portray many messages and themes that I am able to relate to myself. This made the book much more enjoyable as well as intriguing.more
This book was definitely worth the read, I enjoyed it from page one till the end. I especially liked how you could pick up the book from understand exactly what was going on, even though it had a continuous storyline. It was very easy to get yourself immersed into the storyline, and the world of Esperanza. You almost felt like you were living on Mango street, in the house that wasn't a home.more
The House on Mango Street was a great book if you would like to read a quick, short,and enjoyable book. It is also a very empowering and inspiring novel. I did not enjoy the format of the book as it is made up of multiple very short chapters which are not connected to the others besides the fact that they all are about Esperanza and her life on Mango street. However if you want to just flip to a chapter or read a short story, instead of a long flowing novel, this book would be great. It is also a good read for everyone, especially young people who can connect to the main character Esperanza. The book will also make you rethink things in your own life as you read about Esperanza's.more
Not sure what to make of this one. I didn't find this book boring, since each chapter stands almost completely alone and is very short, so you don't need a long attention span to read it. It's just a bunch of the narrator's random memories of life as a kid in a Hispanic Chicago neighborhood. The whole thing is very poetic. But I couldn't figure out what the point was to this book. I'm pretty dense when it comes to that kind of thing. I gave it three stars because the author seems to have accomplished her goal (stated in the introduction) of making her writing accessible to everyone. I think I enjoyed the author's introduction more than the text itself.more
Characters: Esperanza, Rachel. Lucy, Sally, Nenny, Marin, Papa, Mama, Alicia, Cathy, Alicia, Cathy, Carlos, Kiki, Louie, Vargas Kids, Ruthie, Aunt Lupe, The three sisters, Tito, Minerva, RafaelaSetting: House in the inner cityTheme: the power of language Genre: Coming of ageSummary: Esperanza always had the image of a perfect home in her head but when her parents moved to a house of Mango Street, it was far from what she had in mind. She feel trapped and fears she will end up like Rosa Vargas, with too many children and no one to help her. The book follows Esperanza into puberty, traumatic experiences and her observation of women in her neighborhood. She then decided that she will never fully leave Mango Street behind and will return to help the people she leaves behind. Audience: Youth Curriculum: Latino experiencePersonal Response: I really enjoyed the use of vignettes. I remember reading this book in middle school or high school but couldn’t remember the details. It was an easy read and would entertain any level reader. Esperanza truly lives up to the meaning of her name, as she never gives up hope for a better life. I believe this is a story that can inspire students to aspire for more.more
"My mother says when I get older my dusty hair will settle and my blouse will learn to stay clean, but I have decided not to grow up tame like the others who lay their necks on the threshold waiting for the ball and chain.
In the movies there is always the one with the red lips who is beautiful and cruel. She is the one who drives the men crazy and laughs them all away. Her power is her own. She will not give it away.
I have begun my own quiet war. Simple. Sure. I am the one who leaves the table like a man, without putting back my chair or picking up the plate."more
The House on Mango Street was the last book I read before Birdie was born, so it goes without saying that it was mostly chosen based on the slimness of the spine. Cisneros wrote a series of vignettes that, tied together, make up a coming-of-age story. Her writing is easy to read and the prose is pretty but for some reason the book as a whole didn't grab me as much as I expected. It was a good read but I probably won't reach for it again.


(three and a half stars) more
I read this to fulfill an assignment to read a banned or challenged book. I'm not really sure why this was challenged. Chicago in the 1950's is tough for minorities. This short book of vignettes tells of poverty and struggle from the view of a young hispanic girl. It was written by the author using experiences from her own life and the lives of acquaintances.more
Do I really need to tell you about this book? Do you really need to know anything more than that this book is about a lovely young Hispanic girl, Esperanza Cordero, who is growing up in a little neighborhood in Chicago? Maybe I might add that it’s a book of little stories about her growing-up years and her neighbors and her family? And maybe you will want to know that the writing is beautiful and thoughtful and painful and jubilant?Anything else? Maybe you should know that this is one of those books that reads like little poems of stories?I guess I should tell you that I think you must read it. Whoever you are. It’s a must-read kind of book. It really is. And it’s not long. So go ahead and find a copy and read it. Today, I think.more
La casa en Mango Street is coming of age short novel that depicts the life experiences of Esperanza, a twelve year old Chicana (Mexican-American) growing up in a poor neighborhood in Chicago. The novel is written in short vignettes that are narrated by Esperanza. This book highlights the everyday experiences and challenges that she faces and tells us all about her aspirations, dreams, and goals. The title of the book has much significance because Esperanza's house on Mango Street is what inspired her to pursue and education and achieve her dream of getting out of that neighborhood and become "someone important".more
This was a series of short vignettes about a young Latina girl growing up in a poor neighborhood in Chicago in the 1980s. The vignettes show the everyday experiences and challenges faced by the people in the neighborhood through the eyes of Esperanza. She has high hopes and aspirations, but she has a lot of questions about life and how to make hers better than what she sees around her.I didn’t find anything remarkable about the book, but did enjoy it overall. I found Esperanza charming and her naiveté refreshing, so it was fun to read about this time of her life.more
Esperanzo is a Latino girl who lives in Chicago. She is narrator of the novel The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cineros. Esperanzo tells the story by introducing her neighbors. Each neighbor is unique. It's fun to learn about their personalities. It made me realize that although people live in one area very close together no person is really like the other individual. I discovered that it's the very oddities of our natures which make our existence together like a fun stroll through a foreign market place. There are so many neighbors in the novel doing their own thing. I tried to remember different ones to write about in the book review.I might as well talk about Esperanzo. Esperanzo hates her name. I loved her name immediately. I think Esperanzo will grow up and move away and become a successful lady. She's very intelligent. Not all children would observe their neighbors so well. Cathy is a lady on the block who loves cats. She is the QUEEN of CATS.This is Esperanzo's description of Cathy. "...cats and cats and cats. Baby cats, big cats, skinny cats, sick cats. Cats asleep like little donuts. Cats on top of the refrigerator. Cats taking a walk on the dinner table. Her house is like cat heaven."Just from reading this one description of a neighbor it's easy to tell how well Sandra Cisneros writes about this Latino community in Chicago. I like to think that some of these people in the neighborhood are real people Sandra Cisneros might have known.I also liked the description of Esperanzo's house. It's a red house. One of the sad facts about Esperanzo is her family moves constantly. She is never in one place for long. That means making new friends, going to a new school, etc. "We didn't always live on Mango Street. Before that we lived on Loomis on the third floor, and before that we lived on Keeler. Before Keeler it was Paulina, and before that I can't remember. But what I remember most is moving a lot...The house on Mango Street...small and red with tight steps in front and windows so small you'd think they were holding their breath." Esperanzo has a brother and sisters. She also lives with her mom and dad.Really, there is nothing I didn't like about The House on Mango Street. I would like to visit the little red house. The neighbors? I've met quite a few of them on a block or two in Philadelphia while growing up. I would like to end my book review with one more neighbor's description. Her name is Ruthie. "Ruthie, tall skinny lady with red lipstick and blue babushka, one blue sock and one green because she forgot, is the only grown-up we know who likes to play. She takes her dog Bobo for a walk and laughs all by herself, that Ruthie. She doesn't need anybody to laugh with, she just laughs." sandracisnerosmore
This excellent little collection of vignettes shows an artist willing to write something not meant to be anything but what it is. It's not meant to be the greatest book ever and it never would mean to be that, and that's what I like most about it in a way. The vignettes are graceful and know when to tell you things and when not to. Excellent examples of the vignette form.more
The house on Mango Street is a short novel that seems deceptively easy to read. It strongly evokes Mexican / Puerto-rican Hispanic-American culture. The apparent simplicity of the novel is created by the narrative voice belonging to a young, pretty girl, named Esperanza. She is described as pretty and intelligent, attributes that make no real difference in her social situation, or only call for trouble.The novel describes the way Hispanic women deal with and accept sexual conflict as a part of life. The sexual prowess of men is taken as a fact of life, something the women do not protest or try to understand. Men are men, and women are women.The men in the book appear and disappear, or abandon. The men are daring, tricking women into kissing or rape them when vulnerable (p. 270). Underage marriage and teenage mother ship runs throughout the book.The women role is support, and where possible protect each other. Sally's man beats her, and the women dress her bruises (with lard).The house on Mango Street stands for the reality of Esperanza's life, its dangers but also the familiarity of the cultural setting. Esperanza's dream of another house, are perhaps her longing for greater safety, a different life, although she would find it hard to separate from Hispanic culture.more
I've a feeling I may take some heat for this review. The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros is a collection of scenes from a year in the life of Esperanza Cordera, a girl entering her teenage years in a tough Chicago neighborhood. A plotless collection of scenes praised throughout the world for its poetic language, The House on Mango Street paints a portrait of one family and the block where they live. Ms. Cisneros does a good job, too. By the end of the book, the reader has met and come to better understand a wide range of people. But I don't see what all the fuss was about.There was a lot of fuss about The House on Mango Street when it first came out in 1984. In no time at all the book was in widespread circulation, used in colleges, high schools, even middle and elementary schools. I found my copy on the high shelf of the book room at school. It's a good book overall. It presents a point of view that was not exactly easy to find in print in 1984. And it's short. It should really be considered a novella at 110 pages, half of them white space. Most of the chapters are less than two pages in length; perfect for literature anthologies. The section called "Bums in the Attic" is in the one my school uses.I think the shortness of the chapters worked against my reading of the book. So many quick sketches in sequence, a brief scene in one, a character outlined in another, made me begin to question why the author hadn't taken the time to flesh out a genuine plot, even a slice of life plot. Frankly, it began to feel a bit self-indulgent by the end. There really should be more there there. As for the poetry of the writing which was often discussed back in 1984, I guess so, but I wasn't all that impressed. I felt like I was reading the memoirs of an intelligent young woman writing about people she loved. It's nice that she took the time to share her family with us, but the book did not rise to the level of classic I was led to expect.Towards the end of the novel some of the women on the block tell Esperanza that she'll always be a part of Mango Street and Mango Street will always be a part of her. I suppose I should read this as a statement about the larger experience of growing up in Chicago's Latino neighborhoods, but even with that in mind I just couldn't buy it. Her family spent just a year on Mango Street. You need to spend more time than that in a place before it becomes a part of you, especially at that age. There just wasn't enough in the book for me to believe that Mango Street could be that meaningful after one year. There will be other streets, other towns, other people. Other books, too. That I felt the author agreed with the women who made this claim just made me suspicious of her. Mango Street? Why is Mango Street so important?Sometimes a street is just a good place to be from.more
The House on the Mango Street is brilliant. With a catchy title and an innocent voice of a child, Sandra Cisneros tells us a story of a girl in a series of vignettes. Readers will be moved by the power of Cisneros’s words. From the moment I opened the book and read the first chapter of this book, I knew right away that it has a lot to offer…“We didn’t always live on Mango Street. Before that we lived on Loomis on the third floor… and before that I can’t remember. But what I remember most is moving a lot....The house on Mango Street is not ours, and we don’t have to pay rent to anybody… But even so it’s not the house we’d thought we’d get. ...I knew we had to have a house… One I could point to… The House on Mango Street isn’t it. For the time being, Mama says. Temporary, says Papa. But I know how those things go.”more
Young Esperanza shares her life as she grew up on Mango Street, sharing stories of her family and neighbors around her in a series short vignettes. There's no straightforward, chronological storyline, rather the novel is formed as a series of snapshots from a child's memories. Some are sweet and funny, others are sad, but an overall portrait of the street can be discovered by the time the story is done. And while there is no coherent overarching storyline, there is the thread of Esperanza's point of view and personal growth that holds the vignette's together. The 25th anniversary edition also has the bonus of an introduction by Cisneros, which tells how she came to write Mango Street and how she managed to eek out a personal space for herself, despite her Hispanic parents and heritage that tends to be protective of its women. The introduction, too, is written in the clean and sparse, and poetic style that offers an easy an enjoyable read.more
This story is about a young Mexican-American girl who comes of age on Mango Street in Chicago. The narrator chronicles her life living in relative poverty as a Mexican-American teenager and her desires to improve her live and move off of Mango Street. The story is told in vignettes and can be taught as a whole or in parts. The narrative voice uses some unconventional colloquial sentence structures. The narrator is sexual assaulted in the story, but the assault is not directly described. Some mature themes represented.more
I found the introduction filled with unintended ironies. Cisneros said she wanted to write a book that you could turn to any page and find it accessible. For one thing, she said she was "abandoning quotation marks to streamline the typography and make the page as simple and readable as possible." Really? Personally, as far as I'm concerned, punctuation marks are our friends. Quotation marks in the most economical way signal that we are reading a conversation, and through conventions such as alternating paragraphs tell us this is an exchange between two people. Conventions help readability. Lack of quotation marks tell us we're in literary fiction land of difficult, dense prose beloved of academics--not a readable story the ordinary reader will enjoy. In fact, it has become my policy if an author doesn't use quotation marks to shut the book and back away slowly. Why didn't I do that? Because I read this was a celebrated book about the Hispanic-American experience. Cisneros is fairly close to me in age, like me grew up in a big city (Chicago rather than New York) and like me has a Latino background. (Mexican rather than Puerto Rican). In other words, I thought I might identify, recognize commonalities in our experiences that would give me insight into what is accidental and incidental in my family experience and what comes out of being Hispanic, or at least something that took me back to my childhood with my family.But really, I didn't last long despite my resolutions--I just hated the book's structure and style so much. Cisnero also says in her introduction that when she wrote this she didn't realize she wasn't writing a novel since she hadn't heard of "story cycles." You know what? I still don't think what she wrote was a novel. Not remotely. A novel isn't any work you say it is within two covers. I doubt this is long enough for one. I'd be very surprised if it came to even 30,000 words. That's a novella at best--not a novel. But also a novel represents a certain structure, and I don't think a series of short linked prose poems about a character (Esperanza Cordro) cuts it. Many of the 45 chapters didn't even come to 150 words. (And people think James Patterson is terse!) The prose was rambling, repetitive, and to me, instead of coming across as genuine seemed--oh, the sort of pretentious artificial thing I've seen a thousand times among a certain left-wing literati of all kinds of ethnicities that to me seems the very opposite of "diverse" yet seems to define it among many. Yeah, I totally believe this is often assigned in schools. Maybe that accounts for its bestseller status. I didn't for a moment believe this was the first person voice of a young teen girl coming of age. (That it was written by someone attending an elite poetry workshop as told in the introduction? That I believe.)So yeah, so not something I enjoyed or that matched the hype in the blurbs and back cover.more
I preface this review with the fact that I am a white male who's almost in my thirties; however, I have been around Hispanic culture my whole life and, without a doubt, Cisneros accurately gives justice to said culture via humor, joy, sadness, hope, honesty, and humility. Even I related to Esperanza; her curiosity was my curiosity, her adventure was my adventure, her longing was my longing, and her growth was my growth. I may not have lived on Mango Street, but I can honestly say I've been There, lived There, was eager to leave There, came back to There, left There, loved There, and will never forget those who are still stuck There.more
A very poetic book about the life and struggles of Mexican Americans. The book had such lovely descriptions and figurative language that captivated you. Sometimes I had no idea what the vignette was about, but the writing was enough to keep me going. The book is short and I would have liked to learn more about the struggles. The ending was great--showing that not everyone wants to live that way but some people aren't strong enough to get out themselves and sometimes people ARE strong enough to find a better life and help others too. Also, no matter where you escape too, that old life will ALWAYS be a part of you and make you who you are today.more
The House On Mango street surrounds a young Chicana girl growing up in a primarily Latin American community. I would definitely recommend this book, especially to teenage girls as Esperanza experiences common coming of age events such as friendships, crushes, and feeling insecure about family status and race. Life is oftentimes hard for Esperanza, and she experiences a few traumatic events. The book promotes writing as an escape, (both physically and emotionally) and is definitely a recommended book.more
Little books can pack a big punch, and that's certainly the case for pint-sized The House on Mango Street. Easily read in one sitting, this book is a coming-of-age tale about a young girl growing up in a poor Latino neighborhood in Chicago. Esperanza Cordero, whose first name translates to "hope," is the narrator of this book, and through her eyes, you see the joy and sadness of living on Mango Street.Esperanza at a young age sees more than most adults see in their lifetimes. What is endearing about her narrative is the sense of hope she feels about leaving her childhood behind - to move away from Mango Street and do "something" with her life. In the end, though, she realizes that her experiences are part of her, and she'll never, completely, leave it behind. It's how you learn and grow from these circumstances that shape you as a person.How I missed this book before is a mystery, but I am glad I stumbled upon it. It's a great book for all ages, especially young adults, who may find Esperanza's journey inspirational and relevant to their lives.more
I felt like this book did not tell a clear story, so it started to loose me. I would get very interested in one chapter, and want to know more on that subject, but then Cisernos would start to talk about something totally different in the next chapter. It was a good topic, but wasn't written in an intriguing way.more
Have you ever noticed the little things around you?Maybe most people's anewer is no.However,from this book,the girl named Esperanza Cordero describled the mermories and experience of her life by observing the surroundings carefully.This book gives me a derrerent kand of feel about life.When you are busy for your study or work,you may feel tired or boring for your life,and have no time to notice the little things arround you.But in fact,many little things make your life become interesting and funny.Life is like a song,consites of different notes , syllable.The little things in your life is the nots and syllable of your own life's song.I have learned a importent lesson from this book:the happiness is from bits and pieces of life.So lucky i found this book,i hope every one can read this book and find interesting things later.more
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Reviews

Characters: Esperanza Rachel and Nenny Marin PapaMama Alicia Setting: In a small house, racially segregated, and poor area.Theme: Every culture is different in its own way and identifying oneself.Genre: Coming of age. Summary: This book is about young adult girl who is identifying herself through her cultures and her surroundings. While living in an apartment and moving to a house, which she has always dreamed of, her move wasn’t so expected. As the house is not as fancy or beautiful as she dreamed of. Instead, the house is small and run down. The story paces through different ages of her life from being young to going through puberty. The story also gives the perspective of how she views her community, culture, and her identity. As she continues to have a negative view of where she lives, her desire lies in the goal of leaving Mango Street. Audience: Young adults and ethnically diverse students. Curriculum ties: history, learning about different ethnicities, and language. Personal response: Being born in Vietnam, my parents came over to America as refugees. This how I can relate to this book. The observations she makes of her community and culture are very interesting and critical. In the way it was written, in short paragraphs separated by detailed headings, helps the reader identify what the writer is going to describe. What I liked most about this book is how she describes herself as an avid reader and her education is what will ultimately get her out the circumstance she is in. This is very important, because it helps the read identify the importance of an education and how other cultures may view education. What I think was rough in this book, is the observation of putting some of her male figures in a bad light. But this could just be her observation of what was going on . Overall, I enjoyed reading the book and it is very good to see such a book that exposes the experiences of a not so well-off ethnically diverse family.more
"The House on Mango Street", by Sandra Cisneros was in my opinion one of the most influential books that I have ever read before. Although the easy read and simple structured language did startle me at first, I was able to then find and concentrate on the beauty within the book. Esperanza's narrations within the story portray many messages and themes that I am able to relate to myself. This made the book much more enjoyable as well as intriguing.more
This book was definitely worth the read, I enjoyed it from page one till the end. I especially liked how you could pick up the book from understand exactly what was going on, even though it had a continuous storyline. It was very easy to get yourself immersed into the storyline, and the world of Esperanza. You almost felt like you were living on Mango street, in the house that wasn't a home.more
The House on Mango Street was a great book if you would like to read a quick, short,and enjoyable book. It is also a very empowering and inspiring novel. I did not enjoy the format of the book as it is made up of multiple very short chapters which are not connected to the others besides the fact that they all are about Esperanza and her life on Mango street. However if you want to just flip to a chapter or read a short story, instead of a long flowing novel, this book would be great. It is also a good read for everyone, especially young people who can connect to the main character Esperanza. The book will also make you rethink things in your own life as you read about Esperanza's.more
Not sure what to make of this one. I didn't find this book boring, since each chapter stands almost completely alone and is very short, so you don't need a long attention span to read it. It's just a bunch of the narrator's random memories of life as a kid in a Hispanic Chicago neighborhood. The whole thing is very poetic. But I couldn't figure out what the point was to this book. I'm pretty dense when it comes to that kind of thing. I gave it three stars because the author seems to have accomplished her goal (stated in the introduction) of making her writing accessible to everyone. I think I enjoyed the author's introduction more than the text itself.more
Characters: Esperanza, Rachel. Lucy, Sally, Nenny, Marin, Papa, Mama, Alicia, Cathy, Alicia, Cathy, Carlos, Kiki, Louie, Vargas Kids, Ruthie, Aunt Lupe, The three sisters, Tito, Minerva, RafaelaSetting: House in the inner cityTheme: the power of language Genre: Coming of ageSummary: Esperanza always had the image of a perfect home in her head but when her parents moved to a house of Mango Street, it was far from what she had in mind. She feel trapped and fears she will end up like Rosa Vargas, with too many children and no one to help her. The book follows Esperanza into puberty, traumatic experiences and her observation of women in her neighborhood. She then decided that she will never fully leave Mango Street behind and will return to help the people she leaves behind. Audience: Youth Curriculum: Latino experiencePersonal Response: I really enjoyed the use of vignettes. I remember reading this book in middle school or high school but couldn’t remember the details. It was an easy read and would entertain any level reader. Esperanza truly lives up to the meaning of her name, as she never gives up hope for a better life. I believe this is a story that can inspire students to aspire for more.more
"My mother says when I get older my dusty hair will settle and my blouse will learn to stay clean, but I have decided not to grow up tame like the others who lay their necks on the threshold waiting for the ball and chain.
In the movies there is always the one with the red lips who is beautiful and cruel. She is the one who drives the men crazy and laughs them all away. Her power is her own. She will not give it away.
I have begun my own quiet war. Simple. Sure. I am the one who leaves the table like a man, without putting back my chair or picking up the plate."more
The House on Mango Street was the last book I read before Birdie was born, so it goes without saying that it was mostly chosen based on the slimness of the spine. Cisneros wrote a series of vignettes that, tied together, make up a coming-of-age story. Her writing is easy to read and the prose is pretty but for some reason the book as a whole didn't grab me as much as I expected. It was a good read but I probably won't reach for it again.


(three and a half stars) more
I read this to fulfill an assignment to read a banned or challenged book. I'm not really sure why this was challenged. Chicago in the 1950's is tough for minorities. This short book of vignettes tells of poverty and struggle from the view of a young hispanic girl. It was written by the author using experiences from her own life and the lives of acquaintances.more
Do I really need to tell you about this book? Do you really need to know anything more than that this book is about a lovely young Hispanic girl, Esperanza Cordero, who is growing up in a little neighborhood in Chicago? Maybe I might add that it’s a book of little stories about her growing-up years and her neighbors and her family? And maybe you will want to know that the writing is beautiful and thoughtful and painful and jubilant?Anything else? Maybe you should know that this is one of those books that reads like little poems of stories?I guess I should tell you that I think you must read it. Whoever you are. It’s a must-read kind of book. It really is. And it’s not long. So go ahead and find a copy and read it. Today, I think.more
La casa en Mango Street is coming of age short novel that depicts the life experiences of Esperanza, a twelve year old Chicana (Mexican-American) growing up in a poor neighborhood in Chicago. The novel is written in short vignettes that are narrated by Esperanza. This book highlights the everyday experiences and challenges that she faces and tells us all about her aspirations, dreams, and goals. The title of the book has much significance because Esperanza's house on Mango Street is what inspired her to pursue and education and achieve her dream of getting out of that neighborhood and become "someone important".more
This was a series of short vignettes about a young Latina girl growing up in a poor neighborhood in Chicago in the 1980s. The vignettes show the everyday experiences and challenges faced by the people in the neighborhood through the eyes of Esperanza. She has high hopes and aspirations, but she has a lot of questions about life and how to make hers better than what she sees around her.I didn’t find anything remarkable about the book, but did enjoy it overall. I found Esperanza charming and her naiveté refreshing, so it was fun to read about this time of her life.more
Esperanzo is a Latino girl who lives in Chicago. She is narrator of the novel The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cineros. Esperanzo tells the story by introducing her neighbors. Each neighbor is unique. It's fun to learn about their personalities. It made me realize that although people live in one area very close together no person is really like the other individual. I discovered that it's the very oddities of our natures which make our existence together like a fun stroll through a foreign market place. There are so many neighbors in the novel doing their own thing. I tried to remember different ones to write about in the book review.I might as well talk about Esperanzo. Esperanzo hates her name. I loved her name immediately. I think Esperanzo will grow up and move away and become a successful lady. She's very intelligent. Not all children would observe their neighbors so well. Cathy is a lady on the block who loves cats. She is the QUEEN of CATS.This is Esperanzo's description of Cathy. "...cats and cats and cats. Baby cats, big cats, skinny cats, sick cats. Cats asleep like little donuts. Cats on top of the refrigerator. Cats taking a walk on the dinner table. Her house is like cat heaven."Just from reading this one description of a neighbor it's easy to tell how well Sandra Cisneros writes about this Latino community in Chicago. I like to think that some of these people in the neighborhood are real people Sandra Cisneros might have known.I also liked the description of Esperanzo's house. It's a red house. One of the sad facts about Esperanzo is her family moves constantly. She is never in one place for long. That means making new friends, going to a new school, etc. "We didn't always live on Mango Street. Before that we lived on Loomis on the third floor, and before that we lived on Keeler. Before Keeler it was Paulina, and before that I can't remember. But what I remember most is moving a lot...The house on Mango Street...small and red with tight steps in front and windows so small you'd think they were holding their breath." Esperanzo has a brother and sisters. She also lives with her mom and dad.Really, there is nothing I didn't like about The House on Mango Street. I would like to visit the little red house. The neighbors? I've met quite a few of them on a block or two in Philadelphia while growing up. I would like to end my book review with one more neighbor's description. Her name is Ruthie. "Ruthie, tall skinny lady with red lipstick and blue babushka, one blue sock and one green because she forgot, is the only grown-up we know who likes to play. She takes her dog Bobo for a walk and laughs all by herself, that Ruthie. She doesn't need anybody to laugh with, she just laughs." sandracisnerosmore
This excellent little collection of vignettes shows an artist willing to write something not meant to be anything but what it is. It's not meant to be the greatest book ever and it never would mean to be that, and that's what I like most about it in a way. The vignettes are graceful and know when to tell you things and when not to. Excellent examples of the vignette form.more
The house on Mango Street is a short novel that seems deceptively easy to read. It strongly evokes Mexican / Puerto-rican Hispanic-American culture. The apparent simplicity of the novel is created by the narrative voice belonging to a young, pretty girl, named Esperanza. She is described as pretty and intelligent, attributes that make no real difference in her social situation, or only call for trouble.The novel describes the way Hispanic women deal with and accept sexual conflict as a part of life. The sexual prowess of men is taken as a fact of life, something the women do not protest or try to understand. Men are men, and women are women.The men in the book appear and disappear, or abandon. The men are daring, tricking women into kissing or rape them when vulnerable (p. 270). Underage marriage and teenage mother ship runs throughout the book.The women role is support, and where possible protect each other. Sally's man beats her, and the women dress her bruises (with lard).The house on Mango Street stands for the reality of Esperanza's life, its dangers but also the familiarity of the cultural setting. Esperanza's dream of another house, are perhaps her longing for greater safety, a different life, although she would find it hard to separate from Hispanic culture.more
I've a feeling I may take some heat for this review. The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros is a collection of scenes from a year in the life of Esperanza Cordera, a girl entering her teenage years in a tough Chicago neighborhood. A plotless collection of scenes praised throughout the world for its poetic language, The House on Mango Street paints a portrait of one family and the block where they live. Ms. Cisneros does a good job, too. By the end of the book, the reader has met and come to better understand a wide range of people. But I don't see what all the fuss was about.There was a lot of fuss about The House on Mango Street when it first came out in 1984. In no time at all the book was in widespread circulation, used in colleges, high schools, even middle and elementary schools. I found my copy on the high shelf of the book room at school. It's a good book overall. It presents a point of view that was not exactly easy to find in print in 1984. And it's short. It should really be considered a novella at 110 pages, half of them white space. Most of the chapters are less than two pages in length; perfect for literature anthologies. The section called "Bums in the Attic" is in the one my school uses.I think the shortness of the chapters worked against my reading of the book. So many quick sketches in sequence, a brief scene in one, a character outlined in another, made me begin to question why the author hadn't taken the time to flesh out a genuine plot, even a slice of life plot. Frankly, it began to feel a bit self-indulgent by the end. There really should be more there there. As for the poetry of the writing which was often discussed back in 1984, I guess so, but I wasn't all that impressed. I felt like I was reading the memoirs of an intelligent young woman writing about people she loved. It's nice that she took the time to share her family with us, but the book did not rise to the level of classic I was led to expect.Towards the end of the novel some of the women on the block tell Esperanza that she'll always be a part of Mango Street and Mango Street will always be a part of her. I suppose I should read this as a statement about the larger experience of growing up in Chicago's Latino neighborhoods, but even with that in mind I just couldn't buy it. Her family spent just a year on Mango Street. You need to spend more time than that in a place before it becomes a part of you, especially at that age. There just wasn't enough in the book for me to believe that Mango Street could be that meaningful after one year. There will be other streets, other towns, other people. Other books, too. That I felt the author agreed with the women who made this claim just made me suspicious of her. Mango Street? Why is Mango Street so important?Sometimes a street is just a good place to be from.more
The House on the Mango Street is brilliant. With a catchy title and an innocent voice of a child, Sandra Cisneros tells us a story of a girl in a series of vignettes. Readers will be moved by the power of Cisneros’s words. From the moment I opened the book and read the first chapter of this book, I knew right away that it has a lot to offer…“We didn’t always live on Mango Street. Before that we lived on Loomis on the third floor… and before that I can’t remember. But what I remember most is moving a lot....The house on Mango Street is not ours, and we don’t have to pay rent to anybody… But even so it’s not the house we’d thought we’d get. ...I knew we had to have a house… One I could point to… The House on Mango Street isn’t it. For the time being, Mama says. Temporary, says Papa. But I know how those things go.”more
Young Esperanza shares her life as she grew up on Mango Street, sharing stories of her family and neighbors around her in a series short vignettes. There's no straightforward, chronological storyline, rather the novel is formed as a series of snapshots from a child's memories. Some are sweet and funny, others are sad, but an overall portrait of the street can be discovered by the time the story is done. And while there is no coherent overarching storyline, there is the thread of Esperanza's point of view and personal growth that holds the vignette's together. The 25th anniversary edition also has the bonus of an introduction by Cisneros, which tells how she came to write Mango Street and how she managed to eek out a personal space for herself, despite her Hispanic parents and heritage that tends to be protective of its women. The introduction, too, is written in the clean and sparse, and poetic style that offers an easy an enjoyable read.more
This story is about a young Mexican-American girl who comes of age on Mango Street in Chicago. The narrator chronicles her life living in relative poverty as a Mexican-American teenager and her desires to improve her live and move off of Mango Street. The story is told in vignettes and can be taught as a whole or in parts. The narrative voice uses some unconventional colloquial sentence structures. The narrator is sexual assaulted in the story, but the assault is not directly described. Some mature themes represented.more
I found the introduction filled with unintended ironies. Cisneros said she wanted to write a book that you could turn to any page and find it accessible. For one thing, she said she was "abandoning quotation marks to streamline the typography and make the page as simple and readable as possible." Really? Personally, as far as I'm concerned, punctuation marks are our friends. Quotation marks in the most economical way signal that we are reading a conversation, and through conventions such as alternating paragraphs tell us this is an exchange between two people. Conventions help readability. Lack of quotation marks tell us we're in literary fiction land of difficult, dense prose beloved of academics--not a readable story the ordinary reader will enjoy. In fact, it has become my policy if an author doesn't use quotation marks to shut the book and back away slowly. Why didn't I do that? Because I read this was a celebrated book about the Hispanic-American experience. Cisneros is fairly close to me in age, like me grew up in a big city (Chicago rather than New York) and like me has a Latino background. (Mexican rather than Puerto Rican). In other words, I thought I might identify, recognize commonalities in our experiences that would give me insight into what is accidental and incidental in my family experience and what comes out of being Hispanic, or at least something that took me back to my childhood with my family.But really, I didn't last long despite my resolutions--I just hated the book's structure and style so much. Cisnero also says in her introduction that when she wrote this she didn't realize she wasn't writing a novel since she hadn't heard of "story cycles." You know what? I still don't think what she wrote was a novel. Not remotely. A novel isn't any work you say it is within two covers. I doubt this is long enough for one. I'd be very surprised if it came to even 30,000 words. That's a novella at best--not a novel. But also a novel represents a certain structure, and I don't think a series of short linked prose poems about a character (Esperanza Cordro) cuts it. Many of the 45 chapters didn't even come to 150 words. (And people think James Patterson is terse!) The prose was rambling, repetitive, and to me, instead of coming across as genuine seemed--oh, the sort of pretentious artificial thing I've seen a thousand times among a certain left-wing literati of all kinds of ethnicities that to me seems the very opposite of "diverse" yet seems to define it among many. Yeah, I totally believe this is often assigned in schools. Maybe that accounts for its bestseller status. I didn't for a moment believe this was the first person voice of a young teen girl coming of age. (That it was written by someone attending an elite poetry workshop as told in the introduction? That I believe.)So yeah, so not something I enjoyed or that matched the hype in the blurbs and back cover.more
I preface this review with the fact that I am a white male who's almost in my thirties; however, I have been around Hispanic culture my whole life and, without a doubt, Cisneros accurately gives justice to said culture via humor, joy, sadness, hope, honesty, and humility. Even I related to Esperanza; her curiosity was my curiosity, her adventure was my adventure, her longing was my longing, and her growth was my growth. I may not have lived on Mango Street, but I can honestly say I've been There, lived There, was eager to leave There, came back to There, left There, loved There, and will never forget those who are still stuck There.more
A very poetic book about the life and struggles of Mexican Americans. The book had such lovely descriptions and figurative language that captivated you. Sometimes I had no idea what the vignette was about, but the writing was enough to keep me going. The book is short and I would have liked to learn more about the struggles. The ending was great--showing that not everyone wants to live that way but some people aren't strong enough to get out themselves and sometimes people ARE strong enough to find a better life and help others too. Also, no matter where you escape too, that old life will ALWAYS be a part of you and make you who you are today.more
The House On Mango street surrounds a young Chicana girl growing up in a primarily Latin American community. I would definitely recommend this book, especially to teenage girls as Esperanza experiences common coming of age events such as friendships, crushes, and feeling insecure about family status and race. Life is oftentimes hard for Esperanza, and she experiences a few traumatic events. The book promotes writing as an escape, (both physically and emotionally) and is definitely a recommended book.more
Little books can pack a big punch, and that's certainly the case for pint-sized The House on Mango Street. Easily read in one sitting, this book is a coming-of-age tale about a young girl growing up in a poor Latino neighborhood in Chicago. Esperanza Cordero, whose first name translates to "hope," is the narrator of this book, and through her eyes, you see the joy and sadness of living on Mango Street.Esperanza at a young age sees more than most adults see in their lifetimes. What is endearing about her narrative is the sense of hope she feels about leaving her childhood behind - to move away from Mango Street and do "something" with her life. In the end, though, she realizes that her experiences are part of her, and she'll never, completely, leave it behind. It's how you learn and grow from these circumstances that shape you as a person.How I missed this book before is a mystery, but I am glad I stumbled upon it. It's a great book for all ages, especially young adults, who may find Esperanza's journey inspirational and relevant to their lives.more
I felt like this book did not tell a clear story, so it started to loose me. I would get very interested in one chapter, and want to know more on that subject, but then Cisernos would start to talk about something totally different in the next chapter. It was a good topic, but wasn't written in an intriguing way.more
Have you ever noticed the little things around you?Maybe most people's anewer is no.However,from this book,the girl named Esperanza Cordero describled the mermories and experience of her life by observing the surroundings carefully.This book gives me a derrerent kand of feel about life.When you are busy for your study or work,you may feel tired or boring for your life,and have no time to notice the little things arround you.But in fact,many little things make your life become interesting and funny.Life is like a song,consites of different notes , syllable.The little things in your life is the nots and syllable of your own life's song.I have learned a importent lesson from this book:the happiness is from bits and pieces of life.So lucky i found this book,i hope every one can read this book and find interesting things later.more
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