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Live More, Want Less: 52 Ways to Find Order in Your Life

Live More, Want Less: 52 Ways to Find Order in Your Life

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Live More, Want Less: 52 Ways to Find Order in Your Life

valoraciones:
3/5 (18 valoraciones)
Longitud:
226 página
3 horas
Publicado:
Jan 5, 2011
ISBN:
9781603427425
Formato:
Libro

Descripción

Live More, Want Less gives readers a user-friendly non-judgmental approach to simplifying their lives in a week-at-a-time format. Offering personal narratives, a reflection on a Taoist-inspired "way" toward more meaning, and a list of daily practices that bring tangible change, Live More, Want Less provides universal guidelines for every reader's unique issue. Covering themes like shopping addictions, procrastination, prioritizing, "busyness", weight loss, and more, Mary's "been there, done that" approach reassures the tentative that greater clarity can be gained by voluntarily living with less, and that de-cluttering both physically and mentally can allow one to experience life more fully.
Publicado:
Jan 5, 2011
ISBN:
9781603427425
Formato:
Libro

Sobre el autor

Mary Carlomagno is the founder of Order, a company that specializes in clutter control, urban apartment solutions, office spaces, and life transitions. Before founding Order, she worked in book publishing and retail. She and her husband live in Hoboken, New Jersey.

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Live More, Want Less - Mary Carlomagno

1 Ritual

THE OLD ADAGE that practice makes permanent is true. Anything that you give consistent attention to over time will become a cemented habit. Yogis know this; they have been practicing the same poses for over two thousand years.

Whirling dervishes know this; they spin with a purpose, the speed of the spin bringing them closer to enlightenment. Christians, Muslims, and Jews know this; they regularly go to a church or mosque or synagogue to worship. But ritual is not always a religious practice. Olympic athletes have a routine of regimented practice and weight training. Opera singers practice scales and arias daily. All of these people share ritual; they practice to make their good habits permanent. And while most of us are not training for a gold medal in ski jump aerials, we each have our own goals to strive for, and those involve consistent effort over time.

The beginning of a new year is usually when people adopt new habits – or, in a more familiar term, make resolutions. They address all the new rituals they will put in place when the calendar page switches over and plan for the new routine to literally take root overnight. But like countless resolution makers before them who have failed and failed again, some annually, they quickly learn that changing a mindset and a way of life does not come with the end of one year and the beginning of the next as if a switch were thrown. Anyone who has started the cabbage soup diet on January 1, then crashed and burned on January 4 can attest to this. Good habits take time; while the beginning of the year is the start of a new daily planner, it does not always equate to the transformation of a new you. The date is arbitrary. In reality, every day presents the opportunity for a fresh start. Recognizing that the underlying theme behind resolution making is flawed is the first

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