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El Conde de Montecristo

El Conde de Montecristo

Escrito por Alejandro Dumas

Narrado por Elenco Fonolibro


El Conde de Montecristo

Escrito por Alejandro Dumas

Narrado por Elenco Fonolibro

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (221 valoraciones)
Longitud:
2 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Apr 1, 2018
ISBN:
9781611541052
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

"La historia de amor, aventura y venganza más famosa del mundo"

FonoLibro presenta "El Conde de Montecristo," Audio libro dramatizado en español basado en la historia original de Alejandro Dumas.

Es una de las novelas de amor y venganza más populares de todos los tiempos. Es la historia de Edmundo Dantes, joven marinero, (personificado por el primer actor Luis José Santander), quien el día de ser nombrado capitán del buque "El Faraón" y de planear casarse con su amada Mercedes, es injustamente puesto prisionero por traición, por una conspiración tramada por personas quienes le tenían celos y envidia. Después de varios años de prisión en el Castillo de If conoce a un sacerdote, el Abate Farias, quién le impartió conocimientos y sabiduría, y le mostró el camino para un gran tesoro. Tras escapar y ya poderoso con una gran fortuna, Dantes asume el rol del Conde de Monte Cristo para llevar a cabo su planeada venganza contra sus acusadores y enemigos.

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Editorial:
Publicado:
Apr 1, 2018
ISBN:
9781611541052
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Reseñas

Lo que piensa la gente sobre El Conde de Montecristo

4.5
221 valoraciones / 175 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    Estoy maravillada cómo fue narrado, lo sentí como si lo estuviera viendo en una película. Gracias
  • (5/5)
    The classic story of an innocent man wrongly, but deliberately imprisoned and his brilliant strategy for revenge against those who betrayed him.
  • (5/5)
    I hadn’t read this book in decades, although it was one of my teenage favorites. I was wondering if it would stand the test of time.First, the Penguin Classics translation by Robin Buss is magnificent, and makes clear many points older translations make fuzzy. While as the translator’s introduction points out, this book is now relegated to the YA category, this is in fact an adult book, with very adult themes.While Dumas is perhaps one of the first great masters of genre fiction, this book transcends that classification. Besides being a riveting story, it is also a brilliant and unsurpassed meditation on human nature, right action, justice and revenge and the ethical ambiguity & complexity of all these.Read this book and this translation. Despite the books length you will find it hard.to put down and have much to ponder after reading it.
  • (5/5)
    One of my all time favorite Classics! This just has the feeling of a TV series or a soap opera with the high drama and swashbuckling - fast paced action, unrequited love, treasure, it's all in there. It may look like a thumper, but it doesn't take long to get through!
  • (4/5)
    El clásico de Dumas por excelencia entorno a la venganza.
  • (5/5)
    Alexandre Dumas’s The Count of Monte Cristo is simply one of the greatest novels in all of literature. It is an epic tale of adventure and intrigue, betrayal and revenge, mischief and murder, romance and redemption. It is a remarkably long and complex story with myriad characters that manages to hold one’s interest and still leave the reader yearning for more even at the end of its nearly 1,250 pages. The unabridged Penguin Classics edition with Robin Buss’s smooth translation and solid Introduction is the easily the version of choice. This is a book to be savored, with re-readings certain to deepen one’s appreciation; however, I will not watch any of the film adaptations, as they are sure to pale in comparison, and will inevitably alter the matchless mind’s-eye visuals that the book has created.
  • (5/5)
    Oh, ho, the unabridged version! I've seen the 2002 film, though not the 1934 film. Looking for something interesting to read among the classics, I chose this one recently. In full disclosure, my medication has left me quite unable to sleep like a human being, so I've had a lot of extra time to tackle this book rather quickly (relatively speaking). Unlike other longer books I've read from this period, it's been a breeze to get through, and quite enjoyable. Also, it's another example of a book being superior (and quite different to, in many respects) any film adaptations. My edition isn't exactly this one, as many books I read (when not from the library) are actually on my nook (though I select the closest approximate on this website), and it has a few spelling/grammar/format errors here and there (not prohibitively so). I'm only encouraged to read more works by Alexandre Dumas, who seems to have led quite the interesting life himself!
  • (3/5)
    Everyone in this book is bat-shit crazy.
  • (4/5)
    This story is mostly a very long adventure story with themes of revenge. Dante's is harmed by evil people. He goes to prison where he is without hope but he manages to survive. As the Count of Monte Cristo, he takes his revenge on others by setting them up to destroy themselves. I thought I would really like this story but I often found myself not liking it, not liking the main character and not liking the whole revenge as it also seems wrong. In the end, I needed to remind myself that this is an adventure story. The ending was also displeasing. I did not think it fair to have to mourn for 30 days the death of a loved one. I understand why he did it, it just seems so cruel. What right does the Dante have to act as God? I thought the story was way too long, covered too much territory and I am glad I listened to it instead of read this huge overwritten book. That being said, I would read it again and I think I might enjoy it more with a second reading. Rating 3.83
  • (4/5)
    A fantastic story of retribution and revenge. I took the plunge reading the unabridged version and although it took a while to get into, I couldn't stop reading once the Count had been fully unleashed. I kept expecting negative things to happen to the protagonist but instead, pure revenge. It was great to read through and this one-sided dynamic didn't get boring at all.
  • (5/5)
    I thoroughly enjoyed Alexandre Dumas' "The Count of Monte Cristo" and am very thankful a monthly challenge prompted me to pick this book up, as it really wasn't on my radar. It turned out to be right up my alley and the type of book I really enjoy.The book centers on Edmond Dantes, a 19-year-old French sailor whose enemies get the better of him, leaving him in jail for over a decade before he makes his escape. Dantes becomes obsessed with meting out justice -- revenge against those who destroyed his life, and favor for those who remained loyal. There are some great twists and turns (as well as some tangents, but I didn't really mind them) in this book and I enjoyed seeing where Dantes' efforts for retribution landed. I thought this was a pretty fun read overall.
  • (5/5)
    Revenge is a dish best-served cold, in this case really, really cold. Edmond Dantès takes twenty years or more to exact his revenge on the men who stole his fiancee, his happiness, and years of his life. This is one of the longest audiobooks I've ever listened to. It took me over 3 months to finish, but the story and the narrator made me excited to listen every chance I got. Great book! Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    I so was not expecting this book to so... fun. It is a near perfect book for what it is - drama, love, action, revenge, kindness, absurdity. You should totally read this book.Don't be afraid of the label of classic! Or that it is about a man in prison who escapes and gets revenge on those who put him there. Its not a dark story at all. It reminds me an Errol Flynn movie - where everybody is exactly what they seem, the good guys win, the bad guys get punished, and everybody lives the life they deserve at the end.But, the book isn't perfect - there is some aspects that are quite a stretch to believe. For example, Dante become an educated man by talking to a priest in the next cell over. Or how a ship was completely recreated, cargo and all. Or how the Count has a seemingly unending supply of money. There are a few ethical issues that will cause modern audiences some trepidation. The Count has a few slaves, even though slavery is illegal in France. Or his treatment of Mercedes - was she really suppose to wait for him for all the years he was gone?
  • (3/5)
    A flawed yet still worthwhile masterpiece that shows the prowess of Dumas in creating a character that seems, and feels, real.
  • (4/5)
    Finally finished this, really good read much better than the three musketeers.
  • (3/5)
    The Count of Monte Cristo is a classic story of betrayal and revenge. Edmond Dantes has it all: a father he loves, a pending promotion, and a beautiful fiance. Unfortunately, others envy him his good fortune and conspire to have him sent to prison for a crime he didn’t commit. When a fellow prisoner informs him of a treasure located on the Isle of Monte Cristo, he determines to escape and use that treasure to enact his revenge.

    From the great introduction to this book, I learned that Dumas wrote this to be published in sections in newspapers and was paid by the line. Reading The Count of Monte Cristo with it’s convoluted plot and inclusion of mundane conversations, that incentive is clear. However unnecessarily complicated the count’s revenge may be, it was still a lot of fun to read about. While some sections dragged a little, there was always some part of the plot which made me want to read quickly because I couldn’t wait to find out what happened next. The events could be cliched at times, but I enjoy cliches and to be fair to the author, he may be the originator of some of these now-cliched plot devices.

    One small problem I had with this book was the dislikable nature of our protagonist. As time goes by he gets more and more arrogant, convinced that his revenge is the hand of God! Fortunately for us, a pair of young lovers shows up for us to root for instead, so I never found myself without a character to relate to. Overall, this was far from the best classic I’ve read. It gave little insight into human nature and wasn’t especially well written. Fortunately, these flaws didn’t stop if from being an amusing swashbuckling adventure which was a lot of fun to read. Given it’s success as a light adventure story, I might recommend searching for a well done abridged versions. While the idea of missing parts of a story makes me nervous, I don’t think anyone is going to want to pick up a 1000 page book for light entertainment.

    This review first published on Doing Dewey.
  • (4/5)
    This review originally posted at Christa's Hooked on BooksIt's hard to know where to start when reviewing this book. Primarily because this book is epic! It is a huge story and there are so many important elements, but also because it's just so famous. Most people are familiar with the story of Dantes and his series of unfortunate events and most people recognize this as a classic (and therefore probably worth reading). In addition this is my first audio review! So I hope you'll all hang on and bear with me as I try and navigate my way through this review.The Count of Monte Cristo is the most classic revenge story. It begins with a number of different people going to great lengths to get Dante out of their way. Each has their own motives, none are justifiable. For the first part of the book, it seems as though Dantes lot in life will never improve. But then his luck begins to change and he concocts one of the most intricate and intense revenge schemes the world has ever seen. For the most part I found Dante to be a sympathetic character. He's likeable and determined and his life is just so unfair. What's really interesting is the way Dumas twists that sympathy for Dante as his revenge plot carries out. You know why he's doing it, and you understand his need for revenge but as the plan unfolds the sympathy just starts to slip away.Though this is an amazing adventure story it is also so much more than that. There were a lot of great themes and issues explored in this book – loneliness, revenge, humanity, what is means to be happy. There are so many levels and plot twists. There are very few books written now-a-days that manifest the same quality of storytelling Dumas pulls off. The Count of Monte Cristo gets your pulse pounding but it also pulls at your heart strings.
  • (4/5)
    I’m glad I finally read this book: I loved working my way through it, and I wish I’d read it much sooner. This was a long read, though. Dumas definitely takes a sprawling approach to this tale of wrongful imprisonment and subsequent revenge: some parts took their time to become relevant to the main plot, but even those were entertaining to read (e.g. Franz and Albert gallivanting around during the Carnival in Rome, Benedetto’s backstory, or the tale of Luigi Vampa the bandit). Eventually, though, he plugs all diversions into the main storyline. As the book goes on, the plot speeds up and converges tightly onto its central premise, and you find out that all the digressions were more than worth it. The book even answers the question of what happens after the revenge is complete, which not many revenge tales do.One of the reasons I liked this so much is that it made effective use of some of my favourite adventure tropes. For one, there’s the basic “unfairly accused innocent exacts a carefully planned revenge” plot. Dumas also includes an uninhabited island; a faked death, complete with a corpse-that-is-really-asleep (and bonus points for accomplishing this by means of a potion); the digging of a secret passageway; a sweet polly oliver; a challenge to a duel; a hidden treasure; a courtroom trial with dramatic revelations; a character’s covered-up indiscretions that come back to bite them; the bullied kid who later in life shows off their massive superiority over their one-time bullies; and so on. And it isn’t just these tropes (cool and evergreen though they may be) that made this book such an entertaining read for me; it’s their measured use among long dialogues and pieces of character development. One of my favourite scenes is the one where the Count has assembled some of his enemies at his house in Auteuil for dinner, and serves them rare fish from two small lakes countries apart. First he has two of his international guests explain to the rest why those fish are so rare; then he amazes them by telling them how he transported live fish to Paris from their remote locations, acknowledging that he got the idea from the ancient Romans who did this on a lesser scale and then decided to one-up the Ancients. This establishes his exoticness, his extravagance, his delicate taste, and his practical cleverness, all of which surpass that of his guests; at the same time it’s an unsubtle demonstration that he’s better-travelled than they will ever be, wealthy beyond their dreams, multilingual, and well-read in the Ancients; his interests and his lifestyle are leaps beyond their daily life. Yet the count himself eats nothing of the meal, driving home the point that all the meticulous planning -- either rare fish is known to one of the guests -- and the extravagant expenses incurred were for showing off to these specific guests only: the count is vastly superior to them all, more accomplished than they had imagined was possible up till then. He wants them to be mightily impressed, and he wants them to realize this. It’s at this point that he casually reminds some of his enemies of the dirty secrets they covered up in the past, sowing seeds of anxiety as a subtle punishment for their misdeeds. The whole scene is shameless wish-fulfillment, but I loved every word of it. Another thing I liked very much about this book is that several characters (well, the ones that count) are not pitted against each other as black-vs-white morality pawns; there’s much more of a gray-on-gray morality present here, which makes the characters stand out more against their background and against more straightforward characters. This goes for the count himself (but more on that later), but also for Caderousse, Mercédès, Albert de Morcerf, and Mme de Villefort, to name but a few. To be fair, though, some parts I disliked. Some of the subplots relevant to the main plot later on do take a long time to become so, and while they pay off later, it may initially feel like a bit of a slog. Then there’s the cultural superiority that pervades the text: exoticized Oriental cultures are consistently portrayed as superior to Parisian bourgeois lifestyles; Italians are reduced to curious carnivals and exotic bands of charming bandits living in their ancestor’s ruins; and Christianity is a given, to the point of including a drawn-out deathbed conversion. Also, Dumas has his characters display some attitudes that are rather problematic. Sometimes these (intentionally?) add to character depth, but that excuse cannot be given across the board. For one thing, the count is unapologetic about owning slaves, who, of course, love being in his service (to the point of refusing to be set free), and about getting a kick out of the life-or-death power he has over them. One of them, a black muslim named Ali, he saved halfway through a cruel punishment -- after his tongue had been cut out but before he was decapitated -- but the count intentionally did not step in sooner because he claims to always have wanted a mute slave. Our hero, everyone! His other slave, a girl named Haydée who he raises from age 11, falls in love with her father figure, the only adult male she’s exposed to. Also troubling is the attitude of and about several female characters that it’s noble for them to die if they are no longer attached to a male guardian -- Mercédes is a case in point: her marriage to someone else after she believes her fiancé to be gone forever is presented as unfaithfulness and betrayal by all involved, including herself, and at one point she comments that it would have been better had she died instead of turning her back on one she believed lost. In addition, while the men are off doing things and talking shop, the women faint regularly, wring their hands in indecision, tragically resign themselves to their fate, and assume beautiful and/or dramatic poses when an observer enters the room. Admirable exceptions to all this are, of course, Mlle Eugenie Danglars, who I like to think of as a lesbian, and who makes her own decisions, and Mme. Héloise de Villefort. But I can accept digressions and attitudes towards other cultures and towards women as a sign of the times -- the book is some 170 years old, after all. Overall, then, I can honestly say that loved this wonderfully complex and sprawling novel for the sheer grand-scale revenge fantasy it is.
  • (5/5)
    A pleasure to read and re-read.
  • (5/5)
    Alexandre Dumas I would seriously have to say the term that comes to mind for his The Count of Monte Cristo is "revenge comes limping". If you say this is among your favorites you are automatically admitting that you have a dark side that you like to revel in.. at least on paper. So devious and mindboggingly twisted at times the count of monte cristo kept me up for two days straight not sleeping. I Loved This Book. It is that simple.
  • (4/5)
    What an enjoyable book. There is plenty of duplicity, lives ruined and lessons learned. A happy man is thrown in jail to die because of jealousy, ambition and fear. The man escapes and aquires a fortune, then avenges himself. All manner of circumstances follow. Quite satisfying. Recommended.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: Edmond Dantes has his life laid out on a silver platter. He is going to marry the woman he loves, he was just promoted to being a captain of his own ship, and is well liked by nearly all that know him. Three men are, in fact, so jealous of his "perfect" life that they draft a letter convicting Dantes of treason. On the day of his wedding with the woman he loves, Mercedes, he is whisked away and thrown into a high security political prison. Villefort, the man that holds Dantes trial discovers that Dantes is carrying a letter to Villefort's father from Napoleon Bonepart. So Villefort sentences Dantes to life in prison. After Dantes escapes by hiding in an Italian priest's shroud, which is thrown into the ocean. Dantes cuts himself free and proceeds to seek the treasure that said priest told him was located on the Island of Monte Cristo. After finding this treasure, Dantes takes on the alias of the Count of Monte Cristo. He then seeks revenge on those who falsely accused him of treason, leaving them penniless or dead. Opinion: In my opinion this book is exceptionally well written and surprisingly truthful as to what had actually happened to a man who also hailed from Marseilles. Even though this book was written so long ago it is still a classic and will remain a classic in my mind forever. The setting of this book ranges from Marseilles to Rome and includes the mythical Island of Monte Cristo. I would like to read more of this writer's works but sadly find myself a little short on time. The characters are very well described. I would recommend this book to anyone with a lexile higher than 1000, who also likes historical fiction. I would give this book a 5 out of 5.
  • (3/5)
    To be honest this is little more than the equivalent of a 19th century Dan Brown novel. The Count of Monte Cristo is a very entertaining read but I didn't find much literary value in this "classic."The prose itself is solid but I thought there was remarkably little of weight contained within these 1300 pages. There's little debate about the right or wrong of Dante's revenge (at least until the end and then it feels oddly half-hearted and tacked on). There's really little time to think about anything. The plot rumbles on at such a fast pace that there's almost never a moment to pause and think. On the one hand that does make for an exciting novel but I was hoping for a bit more intellectual heft to this story than I got.The shift, from the start of the story (up to Dante's escape) and from then on to the novel's conclusion is also quite jarring. The beginning is full of insight into Dante's frame of mind and feelings but that is cut off as soon as the Count of Monte Cristo persona takes over. I found this very frustrating. There's very little for us to emotionally feed off of because we have no idea what the Count is thinking. Of course, it's sort of appealing that he's so above ordinary men by this stage but that leaves Dante's character rather flat for most of the novel. I've read short stories with more character insight than the entirety of this book! Whilst we're on the subject of the Count's greatness - yes, his plans all working out nearly perfectly and him being so in charge of everything is sort of attractive - but it's also a little bit boring once you realise that the Count's basically got everything covered and sorted. For instance - was the plot line with Valentine really supposed to be in doubt? That seemed dragged out for rather petty reasons to me if it weren't.Another failing of this still fun book was that Edmond's revenge felt anti-climatic every time. Because Dumas races along so fast (like the Count himself) and the characters are rather flat the satisfaction that ought to be felt is rather minimal. There's nothing in the way of an epic confrontation when the Count finally reveals himself - everyone seems to gasp in horror and disbelief, run off and that's about it.As I said at the start this is a fun novel but it's not the sort of literary beast that you usually associated with most nineteenth century classics (perhaps that's a good thing for some people?). It's an enjoyable read that I was able to get through with ease and speed because of its simple writing and furious pace. But a lot in the story did seem simple and convenient and although I was happy at the outcome it didn't feel as monumental I'd hoped it would when starting out on the journey. The Count of Monte Cristo was fun but ultimately inconsequential. If you want a doorstopper of a novel featuring an outstanding lead character fighting through life and having an epic showdown with his nemesis that isn't always predictable (except for him making the ladies swoon) then try Eiji Yoshikawa's Musashi. Now that's monumental.
  • (5/5)
    I had always thought this work by Alexandre Dumas was a swashbuckling adventure novel set at sea. It’s far more nefarious being a book about injustice and vengeance taking place within the framework of early-19th century French society.I’ve read quite a bit of translated French literature from this period and I’ve found it to be poorly translated and simply irrelevant to today’s reader. This work was completely different and it can hold its own when compared to modern action-thrillers. I was surprised by the fast pace and by how much detail was presented in short time spans. Quite a bit happens within the first 100 pages which grabs you for the remaining 900.Giving a detailed plot summary is simply beyond the scope of a quick review. However, here are a few key points that will hopefully entice you to make the effort to read this novel:A guy just about to make it in the world is completely screwed over by “friends” because they’re jealous.He lands up in prison because of some dirty secret he knows about the chief prosecutor.While in prison, he becomes highly educated and also learns of a massive treasure waiting for the taking.He escapes prison, finds the treasure and adopts a new persona.Under disguise, he uses his money and power to get even. Each person that wronged him suffers from a fate uniquely fitting of their past deeds.In the end, everyone gets what they deserve. It’s a happy ending for some but not for most.This book is ultimately about revenge. It also shows that incredible wealth brings power and with power you can do anything.
  • (4/5)
    If unknown to you, you had enemies who managed somehow to have you arrested on false charges and thrown into a prison without a trial and without a chance to communicate with your loved ones, how would you behave? If you escaped and came face to face with those who destroyed your life what would you? This is the story of Edmond Dantes, a young sailor, who is on the brink of having all his dreams come true. He is going to marry the woman he adores, he has been given command of his own ship and the future looks wonderful. Then his enemies send a note to the authorities saying that he is a conspirator supporting Bonaparte. He is arrested, and thrown into a dungeon and has no chance of freedom.This story was action packed but also filled with emotion and philosophical issues. While you read, it hard to not put yourself in the place of Edmond and Mercedes, and Haydee trying to answer all the questions of WHAT WOULD I DO?I'm not a Classics fan, but this was a great book.
  • (4/5)
    Well-written and exciting! Although The Count of Monte Cristo took me longer to read than any of Dumas' other books, it was engaging and the variety of characters were genius. Even though the story is about revenge and justice, so many other philosophical questions are touched on. I found myself completely taken with Madame Danglers, even though she plays a minor (and strange) role in the book. She seems to have almost as much history as any of the other main characters, yet somehow avoids the tragic end so many of the others cannot escape. I gave the book four starts only because I still love The Three Musketeers the most.
  • (5/5)
    How can you read 1243 pages and wish there were more? That's the way I felt about this book. I loved it!!! Action-packed clear through - never a boring moment. I will confess that I was picturing James Caviezel through the whole reading - even though the book is so different from the movie. This definitely moves right to my top 5 list. I read a quote a while ago that said, "Don't judge a person by the books they read, judge them by the books they re-read." This one will definitely be re-read!
  • (5/5)
    Just a rip-snorting good read; full of revenge, pathos, love, and adventure.
  • (5/5)
    By the end of this book, I felt a little as though some of my best friends were going away, never to be seen again. :(The character development and investigation in this book is absolutely incredible. Dumas is an incredible story teller. He delves deeply into description and details, but knows just when to quit (unlike my other favorite French author - Hugo).
  • (4/5)
    When I first received my copy of ‘The Count of Monte Cristo’ I was a little over whelmed mainly due to the sheer size of the book (this edition was to my measurements just over 5 and a half centimetres of 1276 frightfully thin pages with small print but there is a delightful ribbon to help you keep your place) but also because I was about to read a tale that is worthy enough to be deemed a classic for well over a century (which is no minor feat) and I was slightly worried that if I didn't see how undeniably amazing it was then I’d be a fool not to recognise great literature even if I dropped it on my foot (don’t laugh, I'm so clumsy I'm almost disabled).It’s seems that in this day and age there is very little time to sit down and properly enjoy a good book, Dumas has the wonderful ability to spin a tale of imprisonment, deception, revenge and love that lets you simply lose yourself (and track of time) in the words, turning pages without even realising it, which isn't particularly helpful as I have oft stayed up later than I anticipated and even once missed the bus (I've honestly no idea why I thought it would be good to read before school). I can often pick up where I left off, twenty minutes here, a half hour there, and the tale still seems seamless but my younger sister is a person you takes a while to get in to a story (whether beginning, middle or end)and so she felt that she couldn't really enjoy it and gave up part way through. I think that perhaps for a lot of people the length of the book is a major obstacle which hinders our ability to enjoy and appreciate the book and so the difficulty lies not in interpreting the language as such (as many English lessons on Shakespeare were spent) but more in the length of time such a task takes.I'm think I enjoyed the book but I feel that it’s the kind of book that needs to be read more than once in order to fully appreciate or perhaps that is maybe my fault for skimming parts in anticipation of what was coming next. I hope though that everyone gives it a chance as it is really rather good.As a 21st century teen I am always looking for the next best thing to read but it seems that I've not realised that the stories we publish are immortal as long as there are those of us who continue to love it (badly quoted from JK Rowling) and thus in our search for a good read we must not just look to the new shiny books that are still in their infancy but look back to the tales who have braved the test of time and persevered, Golden in their old age (old relative to yesterday for example).So don’t hesitate, the classics are calling.