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Ana Karenina

Ana Karenina

Escrito por Lev Tolstói

Narrado por Elenco Fonolibro


Ana Karenina

Escrito por Lev Tolstói

Narrado por Elenco Fonolibro

valoraciones:
4/5 (310 valoraciones)
Longitud:
2 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 abr 2013
ISBN:
9781611540864
Formato:

Descripción

FonoLibro se enorgullece en presentar la obra cumbre de León Tolstoi, “Ana Karenina,” la cual es considerada como una de las historias de amor más maravillosas de la literatura universal.

La novela se desarrolla en la Rusia de los Zares, donde Ana Karenina, una hermosa mujer casada con un poderoso ministro del gobierno ruso, se enamora de un apuesto y rico oficial del ejército, el Conde Vronsky. Buscando la felicidad y desafiando las reglas y normas de la sociedad rusa, Ana Karenina, abandona su esposo e hijo para vivir con su amante, con devastadores resultados.

Viva con este maravilloso audiolibro esta gran historia de amor, la cual levanta controversias y conflictos en la sociedad, familia y amigos, y que termina en un inesperado final.

© y (P) 2011 FonoLibro Inc.

Todos los derechos reservados. Se prohíbe el reproducir, compartir, transmitir el contenido de este audiolibro por cualquier medio sin autorización expresa del editor y productor del audiolibro, FonoLibro Inc.
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 abr 2013
ISBN:
9781611540864
Formato:

Sobre el autor

Lev Tolstói (Yasnaia Poliana, 1828 - Astapovo, 1910Novelista ruso, profundo pensador social y moral, y uno de los más eminentes autores de narrativa realista de todos los tiempos.Después de un breve y poco afortunado intento por mejorar las condiciones de vida de los siervos de sus tierras, se entregó a la disipada vida de la alta sociedad aristocrática moscovita. En 1851 decidió incorporarse al ejército. En el Cáucaso entró en contacto con los cosacos, que influyeron mucho en sus novelas cortas.Tolstói regresó a San Petersburgo en 1856, y se sintió atraído por la educación de los campesinos. Abrió en Yasnaia Poliana una escuela para niños campesinos en la que aplicó sus métodos educativos, que anticipaban la educación progresista moderna. En 1862, se casó con Sonia Andréievna Bers, miembro de una culta familia de Moscú. Durante los siguientes quince años formó una extensa familia, administró con éxito sus propiedades y escribió sus dos novelas principales, Guerra y Paz (1869) y Ana Karenina (1877)


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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    La reseña de este audiolibro es muy corta se pierden muchos detalles de la obra original.
  • (4/5)
    Me gustó la historia y la narración. Gracias por permitirnos disfrutar de esta obra.
  • (5/5)
    Anna Karenina una mujer apasionada, feminista en la época inadecuada.
  • (5/5)
    Gran narración, buenas voces usadas y buenos sonidos para ambientar
  • (2/5)
    No me gustaron las voces de los personajes. Y es muy resumida esta versión
  • (5/5)
    Feeling super accomplished to have finished this giant book. It's been on my list of intimidating reads for a long time, and I started it twice in the last several years before I was able to finish it on this read. I think part of the reason that I was unable to finish it before was that I was not really ready to accept it's content. Although titled Anna Karenina, the book is not really solely about her, but more about a concept of prideful, love for love's sake versus a more family based love, that she suffers most from of all the characters in the novel. Terribly awkward way to put that...Nabokov put it much better.

    I was impressed with how much I found relatable in this novel and I think that Tolstoy has a special talent for saying what is often felt in moments of great strife or love. His descriptions of Levin's struggles to propose to Kitty, Levin's and Kitty's opposite reactions on the birth of their son, and Anna's various passionate scenes bring to mind the vast array of emotions (not always the ones that we expect) that come about in moments like those described. I was disappointed in some scenes and bored at others, but I think that all of this emotion ultimately added to my enjoyment of the novel. He makes clear that while there are main characters experiencing their lives most passionate moments, there are also people passing by who know nothing about that and who are living their own, independent and equally important lives. It's a refreshing change from other novels that I've read and I haven't really ever read it's equal for scope. I highly recommend (if you are ready for a monumental reading task), especially if you are an avid reader and have a lot of context for this novel. This is definitely also on my list of novels to re-read someday, probably at a much later date when I've had more time to grow as a reader.
  • (4/5)
    To me this reads more like a series of short stories connected together into a chronological order than a book with one story (and message). There are several scenes I felt were great when read but add next to nothing to the book.The message at the end of the book is clear and many situations that don't really fit into the book builds towards that. Yet Russian politics could have been cut out of the book and it would still have had the same overarching story and just a few scenes changing places. I enjoyed learning about how Tolstoy thought about the time-period and its people but didn't feel it added much to the story being told.Overall I am happy to have read it but will stand by what I said when asked about it, it has great scenes but doesn't feel like a book.
  • (4/5)
    Good, but I could have lived with less Levin--who the hell needs that many chapters of a guy mowing?!
  • (4/5)
    Now that I have finished the book, I appreciate that the introduction in my edition mentions that Tolstoy passes no judgment on his characters--he merely describes. I think this description he helped me enjoy the book more that I would have otherwise. And I think that Tolstoy’s powers of description of characters are so immense because there is no judgement. Characters may judge each other, but the narrative does not. Until the end! I don’t want to spoil anything, but characters who embrace Christianity fare much better than characters that do not, or do not actively think about their religion. I liked how different characters’ stories would slow and speed up at different parts of the narrative, but I found it was slow going despite the pacing quickening at times. I had to discipline myself to keep picking up this book each evening. But I’m happy I made it through though, some of the better parts were near the end of the book.
  • (4/5)
    (Original Review, 1981-02-24)If you're not familiar with the The Orthodox Church's intricacies, don't bother reading the novel. It might also to understand the social context in which Anna Karenina is set, which Tolstoy doesn't explain because he was writing for fellow members of the Orthodox Church who would have understood the particular nuances. For Russian society at the time, an immoral act was one that offended all Creation and therefore God himself - it is quite common for Russian priests even now to admonish those confessing to serious sins by telling them that they are 'spitting in Christ's face'. Yet there are subtleties to Anna's predicament that are probably lost on Westerners: unlike the Roman Catholic Church, which forbids divorce for any reason, the Orthodox Church permits this where a marriage has irrevocably broken down, on the basis that it was never based on true love in the first place and thus null and void. So in the novel it is only Karenin's pride (which for the Orthodox is the greatest sin of all) that stands in the way of dissolving his tragically unhappy marriage. Anna's action challenges the hypocrisy of society and she brings down the anger of the hypocrites upon herself because she has the barefaced cheek to expect people to behave towards her as they did before her "fall" from grace. Her "friends", such as the poisonous Princess Betsy, desert her because she is an uncomfortable reminder of their own failings.In fact, I'd go a little further and suggest that the absence of clearly defined mores has led to the proliferation of petty judgementalism infiltrating every aspect of life. It's like Jacques Lacan said about Dostoyevsky's famous quote, ('If God is dead, everything is permitted'), accurately turning it around to say "If God is dead, nothing is permitted." And so we all throw the first stone at one another...The great Victorian judge and political philosopher James Fitzjames Stephen said that the main deterrent to crime is not the law, but public opinion. He was right. One of the reasons Arab countries have such a low crime rate is that a thief would be shunned by his family and wider community. The most judgmental people I know are self-described non-judgmentalists: they hate (straightforwardly) judgmental people, i.e. people with personalities, who don't have to cling on to PC BS in order to create a persona for themselves.PS. Something I didn't know until recently was that Vronsky, like Levin, was based on Tolstoy's own experiences. He represented Tolstoy's own shallow, artificial lifestyle that he gave up and was ashamed of. Vronsky is mature, attractive and amoral. He sees nothing wrong with pursuing a married woman because society's hypocrisy allows for that, but he gets in deeper than he intended. Not the deepest of characters, but Vronsky's casting in this film was absolutely ridiculous.
  • (4/5)
    First, I started this book 4ish years ago. I would read a chunk of it, than stop for awhile, and pick it up a few months later. Its not an easy read - mostly because it seems like the names keep changing. I understand, what a person in Russia is called is dependent on the relationship, but its difficult. It took me awhile to figure it out. It also helped that the last third of the book had less characters. It would have helped to have a list of full names for the characters. Its a difficult book, but the pay off is immense if you can stick with it.This next part has spoilers, so, read at your own risk.Anne Karenina isn't necessarily about Anna - although the other characters revolve around her. This is a story about relationships. Good relationships, bad relationships and how society views relationships depending on gender. Anna is bored wife of a bureaucrat. Her husband provides for her, and lets her do her own thing, he doesn't make her a part of his life, basically ignoring her until he needs her presence. Anna is intelligent, beautiful, and make a whole room light up when she walks in. When she meets a military man named Vronsky, her whole world is turned upside down. He is a cad, leading young women on, and than dropping them as soon as he looses interest. But, Anna seduces him - even after she denies him, he continue to pursue and eventually Anna gives in. Her husband tries to make it work, but the allure of Vronsky calls - Anna eventually leaves him for Vronsky. But, Anna is still not free. Until she is granted a divorce, she is only a mistress and is ostracized from society, living a lonelier life than before. Eventually, this gets to her and she commits suicide by throwing herself before a train.The next couple is Dotty and Oblansky. Oblansky is Anna's brother, and like to spend money, dote on ballerina's, and gamble. Dotty holds the family together - making sure that there is money for the most basic of upper-class necessities. She considers divorcee him a number of times throughout the book, but it would leave her in a similar state as Anna, even though she would be in the right of the law.The last couple is Kitty and Levin. Kitty is Dotty's sister, and she was the young girl Vronsky led on right before Anna. Kitty ends up sick from the whole experience, but ultimately recovers when Levin ultimately proposes to her. They are the perfect couple, in love, and able to talk through problems, understanding each other's personalities, the good and the bad. These three couples form the core of what Anna Karenina is about. There is also a large parts of the book devoted to Levin's thoughts about peasantry, land management, pointlessness of the upper-class life in Moscow, and belief in God. I'm still pondering what this adds to the book, because it seems not to add anything, and at times, its overwritten and tends to ramble. I do think Levin is based off of Tolstoy and his life, but large chunks of this could have been removed to no effect of the rest.
  • (5/5)

    After several months of procrastinating and putting off listening to this book, I finally dived in, deciding that I would finish this before the end of the year. Surprisingly, I ended up finishing it in a little over a week! I enjoyed almost every bit of the book, and the Audible narrative by Maggie Gyllenhall is very good. She is about as far from being my favorite actress as she can get, but she read this classic admirably.

    This book is known as the “single greatest novel ever written”, and it is very good. Tolstoy's narrative moves easily from stage to stage and scene to scene; the characters’ lives progress naturally through Russian society in the 1870s.

    The story focuses on just a few main characters: Anna Arkadyevna Karenina and her husband Aleksey Alexandrovich Karenin; Count Aleksey Kirilich Vronksy, Konstantin Dmitrich Levin, and Kitty Scherbatskaya. These characters propel the story, and it is their lives and relationships that are followed most closely. Supporting characters include Prince Stepan Arkadyevich Oblonsky, his wife Darya Alexandrovna Oblonskaya, and Levin's brothers, truly a small cast for such a grand Russian novel.

    The novel’s theme centers on relationships, specifically, the relationships in 19th Century Russian aristocratic society of St. Petersburg and Moscow. Anna Karenina is an elite, beautiful woman married to a powerful government official, Aleksey Karenin, with whom she has a son, Seryozha. She has an extended affair with the rich, dapper Count Aleksey Vronksy, and has a child with him, a daughter. Their story follows her inability to divorce her husband, and her increasing unhappiness in the relationship with Vronsky, as she is bannished by society and resents the freedom he has as a man to move in his old circles. Her jealousy and insecurity grow throughout the course of the novel, rendering her nearly mad.

    The other relationship, which serves as contrast Anna Karenina and Count Vronsky, is that of Levin and Kitty Scherbatskaya. Levin is several years older than the young and beautiful Kitty, daughter of one of Moscow's many princes. He is an aristocratic farmer and meticulously cares for his family's vast agrarian holdings in the country. At the beginning of the novel, he was courting Kitty, but had returned to the country. When he returns to ask her to marry him, he sees that she is infatuated with Vronksy, whom he doesn't trust. Vronsky meets Anna Karenina at a ball and stops calling on Kitty, breaking her heart. After a long separation, Kitty and Levin meet again and she happily agrees to marry him. Their storyline follows their marriage and the birth of their son, Dimitry.

    This novel is a slice out of life. The characters are incredibly realistic and complex, as is the pace and plot of the novel. The true artistry, however, lies in Tolstoy's effective setting of one relationship against another. The "good couple" Levin and Kitty have difficulties in adjusting to each other and in their relationship. Levin, like Anna, is jealous, but unlike Vronsky and Anna, he is motivated by love and generosity to overcome his angry feelings for the benefit of a harmonious home. Other aspects of the two different relationships greatly contrast one another. A very compelling character is made of Aleksey Alexandrovich Karenin, whom Anna despises, but who undergoes a convincing and sad degeneration of self as Anna leaves him and he maintains custody of the son that she loves. He gets caught up with a society woman who has converted to a fundamentalist, ecstatic Christianity and gives him advice, ultimately leading him to allow a French faux-mystic to decide the fate of his marriage to Anna.

    The novel has a well-known climax, beautifully written, which allows the reader to come through the shock and pain to what Levin discovers beyond the love of the family life he craved. This is definitely a masterpiece, worth the time spent on every page.
  • (4/5)
    I found the main plot absolutely gripping, though I got a bit weary of Levin, the character who represents Tolstoy himself.
  • (4/5)
    Not only was this a remarkable read, but the love/ hate relationship that I had with several of the characters was an interesting experience. Tolstoy developed his characters in a way that I have never experiences. All of the political hub bub was a bit heavier than I would of likes, but still, brilliant.
  • (2/5)
    Just because you can take 800 pages to say something about the human condition doesn't mean you should.I'd rather be reading Chekhov.
  • (2/5)
    I tried. I have read 1/3 of the book, thr writing is amazing. But the story is dull. 3 relationships crash and burn from adultery or failure to communicate. Maybe if I read this back in high school I would think differently. But in 2017, after reading so many books with the same story line. After all the hype over this book, I expected more.
  • (4/5)
    Tolstoy's War and Peace is one of my favorite books. Many of the reviews I have read rates Anna Karenina as a superior book. I could not disagree more. I very much appreciate Tolstoy's ability to create unique characters and to invite the reader into the minds and emotions of them. I found that I enjoyed the ups and downs of the multiple stories within the novel. However, I found that this novel did not truly have a plot. Through over 1100 pages, I never once remember thinking, "I can't wait to see what happens next!" The novel just plods along as a study of relationships. Another problem I had was that I had a hard time liking the main character of Anna Karenina. I didn't appreciate her actions, and struggled with the end of her story. Perhaps that was more of my life issues than her's, but either way, it soured the story for me.
  • (5/5)
    I read this many, many years ago and always wanted to re-visit it. Suspecting there were too many other books ahead on my list I chose to download the audio version from my library. Upon first reading I was fascinated by the intricacies of social life as described by Tolstoy. This time around what impressed me was the timelessness of his writing. The characters seem as real as those in any modern novel. The social conventions and political discussions were still interesting but it was the characters lives that remained front and center this time around.
  • (4/5)
    Tolstoy’s greatest novel, what some deem the greatest novel ever written, seems to ‘proceed as plotlessly and accidentally as life itself’ (E. B. Greenwood, Introduction to Anna Karenina, p. xii). Tolstoy contrasts two people of different character and temperament both of whom we squirm, flinch and weep in response to their actions. Anna lives for her own needs, passions and freedom. Levin lives for the good of others and his soul. In this way Anna and her affair with Vronsky depicts so outstandingly what modern philosophers call expressive individualism, where being true to our authentic self by expressing our deepest desires and acting on them is heroic. The Tolstoy critic Andrew Kaufman says in an interview that the 1860s were a time of great transition in Russia whereby the more traditional value system was being replaced by a new value systems. Tolstoy watched his friends and family members were getting divorced at alarming numbers. And this concerned him because in his view, the family is one of the key social units. And when families fall apart, he believed societies begin to fall apart. This is a central theme in Anna Karenina. Tolstoy heard people saying, "maybe marriage isn't the be all and end all of life. Maybe even if you do get married, not having kids might lead to a greater happiness." And, and of course, this is something that's very much echoed in today's world. In Anna Karenina, Tolstoy shows that the problem with these arguments is that they come from a false set of assumptions: This idea that more freedom means more fulfillment, that the gratification of one's personal desires, leads to more happiness. Tolstoy came to the opposite conclusion; that in many cases, less freedom can lead to a more abiding happiness because it forces us to make choices to make hard choices, and to commit to those choices with the fullness of our being. And family life is the ultimate embodiment of making those kinds of choices, of limiting our freedom for the sake of love. And so it is the characters who embrace the duties, the pain, the vulnerability of family life—of fatherhood, motherhood, being a son, being a daughter—those are often the characters who in the end, end up achieving the deepest kind of fulfillment.Kaufman gives an example from Tolstoy's own life. While writing War and Peace, he used a very interesting metaphor to describe what he was like before he got married, and what he's like now. It was the metaphor of an apple tree that he described himself as. An apple tree, that once sprouted in all different directions. But 'now, that it’s trimmed, tied, and supported, its trunk and roots can grow without hindrance.' It's a very powerful image. At the heart of it is this idea that sometimes limits are what allow us to grow more fully. And limits are actually what allow us to realise our fullest human potential.So according to Tolstoy a life like Anna's, which looks so romantic and promising, usually ends in tragedy. The reversal of fortunes is shown when Anna and Kitty are contrasted by Dolly (Kitty's sister): “‘How happily it turned out for Kitty that Anna came,’ said Dolly, ‘and how unhappily for her! The exact reverse,’ she added, struck by her thought. ‘Then Anna was so happy and Kitty considered herself miserable. Now it’s the exact reverse.’” (p. 551)Anna becomes a slave to her love/lust for Vronsky and finds herself trapped without access to her son, with excessively jealous of Vronksy, and unable to live without his enmeshed love.Tolstoy contrasts Anna's persist of freedom to desire what she wants to Levin's. Upon his engagement to Kitty, Levin's brother and friends question him about the loss of freedom he will experience when he is married. Levin replies, “‘What is the good of freedom? Happiness consists only in loving and desiring: in wishing her wishes and in thinking her thoughts, which means having no freedom whatever; that is happiness!’” (p. 442). Levin’s desire is not possessive self serving eros (like Anna’s), but generous other-centred agape. The result is that while Levin’s life is not easy, although there is doubt and jealousy and fear and conflict, there nevertheless is true freedom, fulfilment and happiness. He is not enslaved but a servant of love and goodness. I found the book long and tedious at points but I suppose that is because Tolstoy so wants us to “love life in all its countless, inexhaustible manifestations”. He packs in so much of life into the 806 pages, not just in the grand moments but also in the ordinary ones. The result is that you end up on a journey through 19th century Russia, a place and time I have now lived vicariously through. But Tolstoy also takes you on a journey to the very heart of human experience. The plot changes don’t come quickly. Instead Tolstoy spends significant time taking you into the mind and heart of all these different kinds of characters: nobels and peasants, philosophers and farmers, men and women, the promiscuous and duty-bound. Tolstoy draws you in to empathise with all these as you realise you share their same hopes and fears, joys and sorrows, temptations and regrets. The conversions of Karenin, Anna and Levin all demand attention. I am not sure Tolstoy ever really grasps the nature of the gospel of grace. He comes close at points but never really gets there. The closest we get is Karenin’s forgiveness of Anna, Anna’s cry for forgiveness at her death, and Levin’s humble recognition of the gift and goodness of life.I think this novel is like the book of Ecclesiastes: it teaches us about life under the sun and concludes that the meaning of life is “to live for God, to the soul” (p. 785). or as Solomon says, "A person can do nothing better than to eat and drink and find satisfaction in their own toil. This too, I see, is from the hand of God, for without him, who can eat or find enjoyment?" (Eccl 2:24–25)Yes this is the meaning of life, but what does that look like? And how is atonement possible when we fail. Tolstoy raises this question superbly, hints at an answer, but in many ways it's still a mystery. For a clear answer we must turn to the Gospels or perhaps to the novels of Dostoevsky who perhaps understood better the gospel of grace.
  • (4/5)
    I saw the movie and thought I would listen to the book. Very enjoyable as an audiobook although very long so it was great for painting my walls. The narrator does a fantastic job with the emotions of the characters. A very good classic.
  • (5/5)
    I would consider War and Peace the greater novel, but gosh, isn't this a fantastic piece of work? What author so successfully places us inside the head of each of its characters, moving them forward with an unrelenting pace while also tying them so closely to the fortunes of their nation? Wondrous.
  • (4/5)
    Another that I don't have that much to say about, others have already said pretty much anything there is to say.Anna is an enjoyable read. It went a bit quicker than I anticipated given its length and age, but Tolstoy has written wonderful "real" characters, and while the nuances & laws may have changed somewhat over time, the experiences are still essentially the same. There's not really much plot, it's all about the people - the romances and heartbreaks, living life, contemplating life. I was slightly underwhelmed with the very end, I guess I was expecting something a bit more ...final, but after sleeping on it I'm a bit more content; it does make sense, given the nature of the entire book. It's good, easily recommended for those who like character-driven novels and/or Russian classics.
  • (5/5)
    Joy's Review: I just loved the flow of the first half of this classic when the narrative moved seamlessly between characters and locations. After that, things often felt disjointed to me and I thought 100-150 pages shorter would have worked for me. Regardless, I thoroughly enjoyed revisiting a book I hadn't read since High School. All of the characters are so vivid and realistic; few are very likeable. I feel for Anna who had so few options in a society that so severely limited the options open to women and I often wanted to shake her. Most classics are that for a reason; if you've never read "Anna Karenina", pick it up!
  • (5/5)
    It's hard to say anything original about a classic, but I would just say this is about lots of things besides romance, although that's in there. The major theme that interested me was the idea of self-centeredness and its destructive effects on relationships.
  • (4/5)
    Beautiful,Tragic ....a wonderful read
  • (2/5)
    A Russian Soap Opera!
  • (4/5)
    This took me just under a month to read, which is pretty good going considering it's over 1000 pages. We had our ups and downs - I didn't actually take very well to Anna Karenina, but other characters I did like - such as Levin and Kitty. I found Anna rather cold and wasn't able to empathise with her very much. The time frame must be only three years, and the writer goes into some depth about Russian agriculture, religion and politics, but I found this very interesting. I will definitely read other Tolstoy and am looking forward to War and Peace in the near future.
  • (5/5)
    Psychologically meticulous and deeply moving, Anna Karenina probes the human condition so acutely and so deeply that it sorta has to be like 900 pages. Well maybe like 700. There's a good 200 pages of description and dialectic about the Russian class and agrarian system that will probably be somewhat lost of modern readers, at least it was to me. Great pathos, great psychological insight, but at times slow and meandering, without knowledge or interest in 19th century Russian agriculture. Overall great read, but if I'm going to read Russian I'm sticking with Dostoevsky.
  • (5/5)
    Anna Karenina is my white whale. I have attacked this novel from every possibly angle for approximately 7 years and it still gets away from me. The length is not the issue; I am a fast reader. Enjoyment is not the issue; I deeply engage with most books that I read and this one is too good not to... but despite that, I just can't seem to handle the Russians. I am on my fourth read-through of Anna Karenina and I have yet to finish it. I've made it farther than ever before this time, a tantalizing 200-or-so pages from my goal. But I've stopped again. For whatever reason, I cannot handle the Russians. Lucky for me, I have now read the novel enough times that I no longer need to go back and familiarize myself with the events. I love what I've read of this book, its beautiful and it immerses you totally in its world. This translation in particular is excellent. Should I ever finish, I will pay my compliments to the translators.
  • (3/5)
    What a struggle, these Russians. A fascinating read if you can get a copy with lots of footnotes, the window it gives into the society of that era is its most redeeming feature. Anna herself is a frustrating protagonist of an almost soap opera mentality, drama after drama. The ending is almost a relief.