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Juliet the Maniac: A Novel

Juliet the Maniac: A Novel

Escrito por Juliet Escoria

Narrado por Jennifer Jill Araya


Juliet the Maniac: A Novel

Escrito por Juliet Escoria

Narrado por Jennifer Jill Araya

valoraciones:
4/5 (8 valoraciones)
Longitud:
8 horas
Publicado:
Jun 18, 2019
ISBN:
9781684574544
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

A shockingly dark, funny, and heartbreaking portrait of a young teenager's clash with mental illness and her battle toward understanding and recovery

Ambitious, talented 14-year-old honors student Juliet is poised for success at her Southern California high school. However, she soon finds herself on an increasingly frightening spiral of drug use, self-harm, and mental illness that lands her in a remote therapeutic boarding school, where she must ultimately find the inner strength, and determination, to survive.

This highly anticipated debut - from the writer hailed as "a combination of Denis Johnson and Joan Didion" (Dazed) - brilliantly captures the intimate triumph of a girl's struggle to become the woman she knows she can be.

Publicado:
Jun 18, 2019
ISBN:
9781684574544
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro


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3.9
8 valoraciones / 3 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (2/5)
    This book is definitely not properly marked for triggers. Here's what I could come up with:

    CW: sexual assault, drug addiction, alcoholism, pill addiction, relapse, violent murder against a woman/possibly a sex worker, suicidal ideation, homicidal ideation, underage sex, pedophiliac voyeurism, pedophilia, internalized misogyny, parental abuse, institutional abuse, the f slur, and probably the most frequent and graphic depictions of self harm I’ve ever read.

    This is not exhaustive and I did my best to compile a list from one read through. If you have anything to add please put it in your review too!

    So maybe I'm missing something, but I really did not like the book. I THINK it was trying to make a point about institutional abuse, which is valid and important, but it missed the mark for me. It still doesn't explain the point of some of the casual violence and odd portrayal of mental illness for me.

    I know this is a fictionalized personification of the author. I'm glad of that. The main character is insufferable in her narcissism. Every time a new character is introduced you will get a rating of how attractive they are which is...unique but such a shallow way to look at the world. I think the book tries to be deep but often comes off strange in its outlook...like you're getting punked in a way? Which understanding the narrator now that I've read the book is entirely possible. It's just a very strange book.

    There are a few very interesting moments but they were ultimately fleeting and never revisited or fully analyzed which was frustrating. It came highly recommended by NPR so i had hoped that I could read a cathartic book about mental illness and maybe process my own struggle. I had no such luck. If anything, it increased my anxiety about how the world looks at me.

    IF YOU STRUGGLE WITH MENTAL ILLNESS I DO NOT RECOMMEND THIS BOOK
  • (5/5)
    I volunteered at a rehab center, and this novel is spot pop n about what it is like for the teens I met and helped to recovery. Good job! Good, good job!
  • (3/5)
    When Juliet finally comes to High School, she has high expectations. Since she is assigned to many honours classes, her talents sure will soon be seen by her teachers. However, instead of concentrating on her educational goals, Juliet is completely preoccupied with what others think of her, why she does not fit in and why she even lost the only friend she had in middle school. She struggles more and more and enters a spiral of drugs and self-harm until she, at last, cries for help and is brought to a hospital. With changing school, she hopes to find back to her old self, but the mental illness she has to recognize as a part of her personality, keeps her at the edge between life and death.I have read several novels about teenagers developing mental illnesses and struggling to come back to something like a normal life. Thus, I was keen on reading Juliet Escoria’s novel which comes with high praise and was highly anticipated. Sadly, the protagonist didn’t really convince me and I hardly could relate with her and her fate.The biggest problem for me was that throughout the novel I had the impression that the medicine to treat bipolar disorder or depression is somehow glorified and paralleled with “ordinary” drugs that are consumed by teenagers, such as alcohol, marihuana or any type of pills. Also the fact that having sex while being completely out of your mind was repeatedly portrayed as something you should go for left me a bit wondering. Since Juliet does not really seem to be willing to overcome her addictions or to find a way of living with her diagnosis and the side effects that come with it, I also did not find the novel helpful in any way.Well, there were some entertaining parts in it, it was even funny at times. And surely it shows that absolutely anybody might end up with mental struggles and that you cannot really do something about it. The tone was adequate for a teenager, even though she often sounded a bit older than just the 14 she was at the beginning.