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Murder at the British Museum

Murder at the British Museum

Escrito por Jim Eldridge

Narrado por Peter Wickham


Murder at the British Museum

Escrito por Jim Eldridge

Narrado por Peter Wickham

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (12 valoraciones)
Longitud:
8 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jan 4, 2019
ISBN:
9781407977393
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

1894. A well-respected academic is found dead in a gentlemen’s convenience cubicle at the British Museum, the stall locked from the inside. Professor Lance Pickering had been due to give a talk promoting the museum’s new “Age of King Arthur” exhibition when he was stabbed repeatedly in the chest. Having forged a strong reputation working alongside the inimitable Inspector Abberline on the Jack the Ripper case, Daniel Wilson is called in to solve the mystery, and he brings his expertise and archaeologist Abigail Fenton with him.

Editorial:
Publicado:
Jan 4, 2019
ISBN:
9781407977393
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor

Jim Eldridge has had ninety-five books published, which have sold over three million copies. He is also a radio, TV and movie scriptwriter who has had 250 TV scripts broadcast in the UK and internationally. He lives in Sevenoaks, Kent. http://www.jimeldridge.com/

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4.3
12 valoraciones / 2 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    Good book. Characters I will want to meet up with again.
  • (2/5)
    The reader was the best part of this audiobook. There are truncated chapters and audio issues with the recording, as I've noticed with other books by this publisher.

    Subtlety is lost on this author. Every character has to be writ large, so that the points he wants to convey are not missed: no fear of that, as they are hammered home over and over again. One of the protagonists is a strong female lead! She's an internationally known archaeologist! She's traveled alone aroundv the world! She's living with a former policeman without being married to him! She's strong and capable! She doesn't need a man!

    One of those things--even two--would be believable at a stretch for the time period. But ALL of them? Let alone that in an attempt to make hey seem intelligent and resourceful, she calls so many shots during the course of the investigation that we are left wondering how on earth her partner ever managed at Scotland Yard.

    Clearly a lot of research was done to write this book, but it needed to be edited down. Any opportunity to name-drop a famous figure if the time and what they're famous for is exploited; interesting facts about London take up unnecessary paragraphs that only decrease the believability of the characters. But then this is contrasted with the use of words and phrases (stakeout, bed and breakfast) that didn't come into usage until the 1940s.

    The bones of a fun, interesting mystery are here. But the book is just too much of everything to be enjoyable.