Disfruta de este título ahora mismo, y de millones más, con una prueba gratuita

Gratis por 30 días. Luego, $9.99/mes. Puedes cancelar cuando quieras.

De la Tierra a la Luna

De la Tierra a la Luna

Escrito por Júlio Verne

Narrado por Jose Duarte


De la Tierra a la Luna

Escrito por Júlio Verne

Narrado por Jose Duarte

valoraciones:
4/5 (16 valoraciones)
Longitud:
5 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Feb 2, 2019
ISBN:
9781611541816
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro

Descripción

Fonolibro se enorgullece en presentar el audiolibro De la Tierra a la Luna de Julio Verne. Esta obra clave, nos introduce en el mundo de la pasión y la admiración por la ciencia, mediante un divertido desarrollo de la historia, perteneciente a la época idílica de su fe en la ciencia, narra con notables dosis de humor e ironía la preparación y envío a la Luna de un gigantesco proyectil, en el que se destaca la capacidad de anticipación que mostró Julio Verne en muchas de sus obras.
El extraordinario relato, dotado de una profunda visión científica, aborda las particularidades del proyecto, su desarrollo y la realización de un viaje a nuestro satélite, promovido por el genial artillero Impey Barbicane, acompañado por su rival, el capitán Nicholl y el aventurero Michel Ardan.
Los tres valientes exploradores, célebres en los fastos astronómicos, atravesaron audazmente el espacio y se jugaron la vida en la más increíble empresa, que un siglo después, asombrosamente se haría realidad.
©(P) 2019 FonoLibro Inc. Todos los derechos reservados. Se prohíbe el reproducir, compartir, transmitir el contenido de este audiolibro por cualquier medio sin autorización expresa del editor y productor del audiolibro, FonoLibro Inc.
Editorial:
Publicado:
Feb 2, 2019
ISBN:
9781611541816
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro

Sobre el autor


Relacionado con De la Tierra a la Luna

Audiolibros relacionados

Artículos relacionados


Reseñas

Lo que piensa la gente sobre De la Tierra a la Luna

3.9
16 valoraciones / 13 Reseñas
¿Qué te pareció?
Calificación: 0 de 5 estrellas

Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    Muy Bueno e,diente obra, y la iNfRacción estupenda gracias a los a tores
  • (4/5)
    First half Verne is very interested in the logistics of firing a vehicle to the moon. He spends a lot of time doing the math.The second half is more about the people and how they deal with the situation.
  • (4/5)
    According to the Introduction by Robert A. W. Lowndes, "From the Earth to the Moon" is the first story of a moon-flight using the rocket principle. The book was a success in its time, and given the incomplete publishing history I found, with the most recent edition published in 2006, is still a success. I would venture to say it has more to offer to today's audience than simply a classic adventure story, which it certainly remains. But it is also, today, a fascinating historical artifact, documenting to some extent the degree of scientific knowledge and sophistication of the 19th century audience. The story presents some scientific knowledge, which is useful; it presents other scientific conjectures which are laughable, but quaint (for instance, upon completion of the telescope, the country was awaiting word or sightings of settlements and "roaming herds of lunar animals"). Despite the antiquated science, the book continues to work as a classic adventure story, and Verne captures the excitement of the country's population monitoring the progress of the "great experiment"; it is easy to see why the book was a success, and it's enjoyable to consider the reactions of people reading it upon its initial publication.
  • (3/5)
    Mostly rather dull, lacking the sense of dynamism and adventure of Verne's other classics, at least until the final third of the novel when Captain Nicholls properly joins the plot as Michel Ardan's and Barbicane's antagonist. The early part of the book reads too much like a dry Victorian technical manual on casting cannons. I also find it difficult to get past the now ridiculous science.
  • (4/5)
    While the science about the moon is certainly dated, this adventure is still chockful of enthusiastic suppositions about what might be on the moon. There were several sections which were dry calculations, but the chapters were short and the story kept moving. In fact, there were some assumptions Verne made which are very close to fact, and the troubles which the trio encounter in their projectile mirrored some of those of Apollo 13, many years later--and the characters prefigure some of the resolutions (think about the problems with oxygen). All in all, I enjoyed the read.
  • (4/5)
    Whoa, thank goodness I didn't read the back cover of the book, or else several fun surprises would be spoiled.Holy Verne, it's been so long since my last fix of his work. Two years perhaps. From the Earth to the Moon is light but still well written. This book was published in 1865, more than a hundred years (!) prior to the first successful moon landing by the men of Apollo 11.I'm not able to prove all the scientific calculation and details described so eloquently here, but they're sure as hell convincing enough. Again, Verne never ceases to amaze me with his knack of making technical details to be interesting.He actually made some correct predictions, such as:1. the country who successfully sent a manned mission to the moon is the US. Well, he did manage to include a French guy to join the mission - nationalistic interest perhaps?2. the two states contesting to be the launch site were Florida and Texas. Yep, and Florida won too in real life.3. the shape of the capsule and there were three people on board. Remember Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins?Verne did see far into the future. And he complemented all of those with wisecracking humor in between. Je vous adore beaucoup, monsieur!Distance is an empty word, distance does not exist!Believe in the power of imagination and let it flow, because you'll never know what the future holds.
  • (3/5)
    Once the Civil War has ended the members of the Baltimore Gun Club are without a purpose; they had been busy improving weaponry during the war. Their president, Impey Barbicane, has a compelling idea, however. They will build a giant cannon and send a projectile to the moon!

    The fourth of the Extraordinary Voyages series, this was first published in 1865. That was 104 years before the USA actually did send a man to the moon, and it’s interesting to read the “science” and compare Verne’s suppositions with what actually happened in 1969.

    Verne populates the novel with a colorful cast of characters. The members of the Gun Club are mostly veterans, and many had been severely injured on the battlefield: “Pitcairn calculated that in the Gun club there was not quite one arm for every four men, and only one leg for every three.” But these men are hardly disabled; they have the courage of their convictions and nothing will deter them from achieving their goals. There’s a great deal of humor in the interactions between the characters, as they argue among themselves what properties the cannon and projectile will have and where and when the launch will take place.

    It was an enjoyable adventure tale, though I admit to skimming over much of the scientific calculations. It’s easy to see why these Extraordinary Voyages have remained popular for over a century.
  • (5/5)
    I had heard people talk about this book, but had never taken the time to read it. Written in 1865, it is amazing that Verne got most of the science right. The main difference between the book and the actual moon shot some 100 years later was the placement of the propulsion system. The dialogue seems rather basic and the book is probably geared to more of a middle school type audience. The explanations of all the problems to be overcome and the discussions of the solutions became tedious at times, but Verne was just showing he had considered this story very carefully. This is still a classic and I recommend it to any science fiction fan. Jules Verne was truly a man way ahead of his time.
  • (3/5)
    A very quaint period piece with some satire and hyperbole thrown in for fun.
  • (5/5)
    Surprisingly prescient in many ways, though some details were overlooked even by the standards of the time in which it was written (being shot out of canon capable of escape velocity – it's putting all its thrust into the initial shot and none thereafter, because it's not a missile – would cause sufficient g forces to kill you). Perhaps this is the fault of the characters, and not the author, but I cannot recall anyone involved having thought about how to get back.
  • (4/5)
    What a quirky little book! The synopsis sounds ridiculous by today's standards; design a 900 foot cannon to shoot a huge ball to the moon using cotton impreganted with some highly flammable substance as 'fuel' (called Pyroxite)And yet the book is laced with good sound science that one would expect to find in a modern hard SF book! The distance to the moon is known as is its orbital velocity and details such as the apogee and perigee of the moon are figured into the itineray. Its all jolly good fun with a mild poke at the Americans-even though the main characters are American and it reads as if written by an American, at times one detects the odd poke at the 'Yankees' as Verne's character refers to his colleagues. A group called the Gun Club form with the intention of making bigger and better arms, but when peace is declared its members feel somehow deprived of an enemy to fight and so must look elsewhere. Then up pops the idea of a huge gun, bigger than anything they have seen before, and it will be used to fire a cannon at the moon to gain relations with the selenites up there (i.e. colonise!) and plant the American flag declaring the world theirs! But thats how people thought back in the day, and bear in mind this was written over 100 years before the 1969 moon landing!All in all quite incredible and great fun!
  • (2/5)
    So boring, and you know most of this won't work now so you're thinking what's the point. The tech talk was mostly over my head too.
  • (4/5)
    Indeholder kapitlerne "1. Kanonklubben", "2. Præsident Barbicanes Meddelelse", "3. Hvilket Indtryk Barbicanes Meddelelse gjorde ", "4. Hvad man i Cambridge Observatoriet mente om Planen", "5. Kuglen", "6. Kanon- og Krudtspørgsmaalet", "7. Een Fjende imod 25 Millioner Venner", "8. Florida og Texas", "9. Fra hele Jordkloden", "10. Stoneshill", "11. Med Hakke og Murske", "12. Støbefesten", "13. Kæmpekanonen", "14. Maanens Roman", "15. Hvad man nu ikke mere kan være bekendt at være uvidende om i de Forenede Stater", "16. Et Telegram", "17. Atlantas Passager", "18. Et Folkemøde", "19. Angreb og Modværge", "20. Hvorledes en Franskmand udjevner en 'Affære'", "21. Den nye Borger i de Forenede Stater", "22. Projektil-Vaggonen", "23. Teleskopet i Klippebjergene", "24. De sidste Begivenheder", "25. Fyr", "26. Overskyet Himmel", "27. En ny Stjerne", "28. Ti lange Minutter", "29. Den første halve Time", "30. Man gør sig det bekvemt", "31. Et Regnestykke", "32. Kulden i Verdensrummet", "33. Spørgsmaal og Svar", "34. Et Øjebliks Beruselse", "35. Otte og halvfjerdsindstyvetusind et hundrede og fjorten Mil", "36. Følgerne af en Deviation", "37. Maanens Iagttagere", "38. Fantasi og Virkelighed", "39. Orografiske Forhold", "40. Maanelandskaber", "41. Natten paa 354 og en halv Time", "42. Hyperbel eller Parabel", "43. Den sydlige Hemisfære", "44. Tycho", "45. Alvorlige Spørgsmaal", "46. Kampen imod det Umulige", "47. 'Susquehannas' Maalinger", "48. I. T. Maston kaldt tilbage", "49. Frelsen", "50. Slutning".???