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Las Aventuras de Sherlock Holmes

Las Aventuras de Sherlock Holmes

Escrito por Arthur Conan Doyle

Narrado por Jose Duarte


Las Aventuras de Sherlock Holmes

Escrito por Arthur Conan Doyle

Narrado por Jose Duarte

valoraciones:
4/5 (2,838 valoraciones)
Longitud:
4 horas
Publicado:
1 dic 2018
ISBN:
9781611541809
Formato:

Descripción

FonoLibro se enorgullece en presentar el audiolibro Las Aventuras de Sherlock Holmes de Arthur Connan Doyle, el escritor mundialmente conocido como el maestro del misterio y el suspenso
En esta oportunidad, las impactantes historias del acucioso detective de Baker Street, narrados por su inseparable amigo, el doctor Watson, se recogen en un fascinante compendio de sus más atrayentes títulos:

Escándalo en Bohemia, La Liga de los Pelirrojos, El hombre del labio Retorcido, El Carbunclo Azul, El Problema Final, La Aventura de la Casa Vacía.

En todas ellas, el arquetipo del investigador cerebral por excelencia que destaca por su inteligencia, el hábil uso de la observación y el razonamiento deductivo, Sherlock Holmes, pondrá una vez más de manifiesto el encanto de su estilo y su genialidad excéntrica en la solución de los enrevesados misterios de los anales del crimen en Inglaterra.

©(P) 2018 FonoLibro Inc. Todos los derechos reservados. Se prohíbe el reproducir, compartir, transmitir el contenido de este audiolibro por cualquier medio sin autorización
Publicado:
1 dic 2018
ISBN:
9781611541809
Formato:

Sobre el autor

Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930) practiced medicine in the resort town of Southsea, England, and wrote stories while waiting for his patients to arrive. In 1886, he created two of the greatest fictional characters of all time: the detective Sherlock Holmes and his partner, Dr. Watson. Over the course of four novels and fifty-six short stories, Conan Doyle set a standard for crime fiction that has yet to be surpassed.



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  • (5/5)
    Me gusta como lo narran
    Muy bueno el libro y la historia
  • (5/5)
    fue bueno el libro me gusta lo recomiendo es bueno
  • (4/5)
    A fun read with some interesting comments about human nature along the way.ON SOLVING PUZZLES AS A WAY OF DEALING WITH ENNUI‘It saved me from ennui’ he answered, yawning. ‘Alas, I already feel it closing in upon me! My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence. These little problems help me to do so.’ (p. 67)ON TRUTH BEING STRANGER THAN FICTION’My dear fellow,’ said Sherlock Holmes, as we sat on either side of the fire in his lodgings at Baker Street, ‘life is infinitely stranger than anything which the mind of man could invent We would not dare to conceive the things which are really mere commonplaces of existence. If we could fly out of that window hand in hand, hover over this great city, gently remove the roofs, and peep in at the queer things which are going on, the strange coincidences, the plannings, the cross-purposes, the wonderful chains of events, working through generations, and leading to the most outre results, it would make all fiction with its conventionalities and foreseen conclusions most stale and unprofitable.’ (p. 68)ON QUANIT COUNTRYSIDES BEING JUST AS MUCH THE OCCASION FOR EVIL AS THE INNER CITYBy eleven o’clock the next day we were well upon our way to the old English capital. Holmes had been buried in the morning papers all the way down, but after we had passed the Hampshire border he threw them down, and began to admire the scenery. It was an ideal spring day, a light blue sky, flecked with little fleecy white clouds drifting across from west to east. The sun was shining very brightly, and yet there was an exhilarating nip in the air, which set an edge to a man’s energy. All over the countryside, away to the rolling hills around Aldershot, the little red and grey roofs of the farm-steadings peeped out from amidst the light green of the new foliage.‘Are they not fresh and beautiful?’ I cried, with all the enthusiasm of a man fresh from the fogs of Baker Street.But Holmes shook his head gravely.‘Do you know, Watson,’ said he, ‘that it is one of the curses of a mind with a turn like mine that I must look at everything with reference to my own special subject. You look at these scattered houses, and you are impressed by their beauty. I look at them, and the only thought which comes to me is a feeling of their isolation, and of the impunity with which crime may be committed there.’‘Good heavens!’ I cried. ‘Who would associate crime with these dear old homesteads ?’‘They always fill me with a certain horror. It is my belief, Watson, founded upon my experience, that the lowest and vilest alleys in London do not present a more dreadful record of sin than does the smiling and beautiful countryside.’‘You horrify me!’‘But the reason is very obvious. The pressure of public opinion can do in the town what the law cannot accomplish. There is no lane so vile that the scream of a tortured child, or the thud of a drunkard’s blow, does not beget sympathy and indignation among the neighbours, and then the whole machinery of justice is ever so close that a word of complaint can set it going,* and there is but a step between the crime and the dock. But look at these lonely houses, each in its own fields, filled for the most part with poor ignorant folk who know little of the law. Think of the deeds of hellish cruelty, the hidden wickedness which may go on, year in, year out, in such places, and none the wiser. Had this lady who appeals to us for help gone to live in Winchester, I should never have had a fear for her. It is the five miles of country which makes the danger. Still, it is clear that she is not personally threatened.’ (pp. 300-301)ALSO ERIC AMBLER SPEAKS IN THE INTRODUCTION ABOUT A BOOK HOLMES RECOMMENDS TO HOLMES BY WINWOOD READ CALLED THE MARTYRDOM OF MAN ABOUT HIS TAKE ON CHRISTIANITYIt took me a long time to read [The Martyrdom of Man] and I relished every moment.The church, the Bible and religious instruction at school had always bored me. After years of regular church-going I still had to watch the rest of the congregation in order to know when to stand, sit or kneel. The words of the service were still to me meaningless. I loathed hymns, found the clerical voice grotesque and the uttering of responses absurd.Of course, I had kept those thoughts to myself. Religion wasn’t something one was permitted to like or dislike. You accepted it in the form provided, as you accepted tap water, or you were damned. Young clergymen sometimes had doubts, it appeared, but as these always turned out to arise from some theological quibble or a dispute over ritual, they were small consolation to a doubter who was against clergymen of all ages and denominations. Now though, here at last, was a book by an articulate, and patently educated, writer which proclaimed, with a wealth of historical evidence and reasoned argument to support its case, that the whole thing was, and always had been, an elaborate hoax.That, at least, was how I interpreted Reade’s findings, and I was sure that Holmes had done the same. It was an enormous relief. My own doubts could now be explained in terms other than those of innate wickedness or incipient madness.The euphoria, however, was brief. Priggish youngsters seeking theoretical justification for their likes and dislikes are, though often successful, not always as fortunate as I was. After the first excitement of recognizing in Winwood Reade a kindred spirit had worn off, and I had grown used to what Watson called ‘die daring speculations of the writer’, I became more interested in the paths by which he had arrived at them than in the speculations themselves. Before long I had begun an exploration of social history which still continues.I remain grateful to Holmes. (pp. 9-10)
  • (4/5)
    Great little mystery stories, I had fun reading this!
  • (5/5)
    A strong collection of Holmes stories, highlighted by the powerfully creepy “The Speckled Band,” the modesty gothic “The Copper Beeches,” and the delightful “A Scandal in Bohemia.”The only story that was substandard for me was “The Blue Carbuncle,” in which the plot was too fantastic to be believed. But even that story is full of the late Victorian atmosphere and Holmes at his best.We tend to forget how much mystery stories and novels owe to Conan Doyle. His ideas and plots are being used even today as inspiration for authors.If you long for gas-lit London, hansom cabs, fog, and excellent detecting, try this volume, either for the first or fifth time. You’ll be glad you did.
  • (4/5)
    I really liked this one, it had a number of interesting short stories in highlighting the skills of Sherlock Holmes. I much prefer longer novels to short stories but I did all these stories fully engaging. Onto the Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes now.