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Alice Isn't Dead: A Novel

Alice Isn't Dead: A Novel

Escrito por Joseph Fink

Narrado por Jasika Nicole


Alice Isn't Dead: A Novel

Escrito por Joseph Fink

Narrado por Jasika Nicole

valoraciones:
4/5 (37 valoraciones)
Longitud:
8 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Oct 30, 2018
ISBN:
9780062844200
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

From the New York Times bestselling coauthor of It Devours! and Welcome to Night Vale comes a fast-paced thriller about a truck driver searching across America for the wife she had long assumed to be dead, performed by the voice of the Alice Isn't Dead podcast, Jasika Nicole, with an exclusive essay written and read by Joseph Fink.

"This isn't a story. It's a road trip."

Keisha Taylor lived a quiet life with her wife, Alice, until the day that Alice disappeared. After months of searching, presuming she was dead, Keisha held a funeral, mourned, and gradually tried to get on with her life. But that was before Keisha started to see her wife, again and again, in the background of news reports from all over America. Alice isn't dead, and she is showing up at every major tragedy and accident in the country.

Following a line of clues, Keisha takes a job as a long-haul truck driver and begins searching for Alice. In pursuit of her missing wife, she will stumble on a forgotten American history of secret deals and buried crimes, an inhuman serial killer who has picked her as his next target, and an otherworldly conflict being waged in the quiet corners of our nation's highway system—uncovering a conspiracy that goes way beyond one missing woman.

Editorial:
Publicado:
Oct 30, 2018
ISBN:
9780062844200
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro


Sobre el autor

Joseph Fink is the creator of the Welcome to Night Vale and Alice Isn't Dead podcasts, and the New York Times bestselling author of Welcome to Night Vale, It Devours!, and The Faceless Old Woman Who Secretly Lives in Your Home (all written with Jeffrey Cranor), and Alice Isn’t Dead. He is also the author of the middle-grade novel, The Halloween Moon. He and his wife, Meg Bashwiner, have written the memoir The First Ten Years. They live together in the Hudson River Valley.

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4.1
37 valoraciones / 7 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    A creepy horror novel full of twists and turns.
  • (4/5)
    This is the novel version of the fiction podcast Alice Isn't Dead, which told the story of Keisha, who takes to the highway in a truck searching for her wife, Alice, who she believed was dead until she randomly showed up in the background of a TV news story. On those roads, Keisha encounters monsters and secrets, strangeness and violence. For those familiar with the podcast version, it's worth pointing out that this is basically the same story, albeit with some editing, changed details, and things left out. It's not a transcript of the podcast, and it's been translated from the first-person narrative of the original into a third-person one.I had somewhat mixed feelings about the podcast, myself. From the beginning, there were things I really liked about it. The monsters are genuinely creepy and threatening and even compelling, in a disturbing sort of way. The weirdness is definitely to my taste. The idea that it was trying to say something about America through the medium of a fictional road trip was intriguing. And there were moments of really good, almost poetic insight.But, I must confess, the shine wore off it a bit as it went along, for me. Even as I still rather liked it, I also got a bit tired of it. The plot went to a conspiracy-theory kind of place that didn't entirely work for me. And the ending felt anticlimactic, its commentary on political activism well-meaning but entirely too heavy-handed.And I think I felt most of the same things about the novel. Well, more or less. The monsters maybe don't feel quite as creepy, meeting them for the second time, but the ending maybe feels less anticlimactic after three hundred pages of buildup rather than three years. The moments of poetic insight perhaps feel a bit muted, or maybe some of them just don't work quite as well on the page as they do delivered in Jasika Nicole's voice. I'm not sure. And, funnily enough, while the podcast felt to me like it dragged on just a little too long, the novel actually feels rather too fast, too compressed. Which just goes to show you how the sense of pacing can vary with the medium.In the end, I'd say that both the podcast and the novel feel like they're grasping towards brilliance but not really making it there. The place they do make it to is interesting, but inevitably leaves me with the feeling that there's potential here that was never quite fulfilled.That truck/skull logo featured on the cover, though, is freaking amazing. I love it so much that, despite my mixed feelings about the story, I bought it on a t-shirt.
  • (4/5)
    "If a point of view becomes one’s entire identity, what was monstrous on the inside can become monstrous on the outside." This is a timely, if thinly veiled, allegory on hatred and prejudice. I enjoyed this aspect of it, and of course the kick-ass female heroines. This is one of the most diverse books I've read recently: a married, lesbian, non-White couple at the center and female leaders of both factions in the "war". How often do we see White men writing books with this much diversity? Now that I think about it, I'm giving this book an extra star for that fact alone. The story and writing itself didn't stand out as much for me. The timing was disjointed, but that can likely be attributed to the fact that it's based on a podcast and thus written in serialized format. It could also just be that I'm not big on weird monsters.
  • (4/5)
    Lovers of the podcast will probably be like me and really dig in for part3. Those to whom this story is completely new to will get a great experience from the start. Would probably only recommend purchasing this if you’re new. Long time fans should try a chapter in the middle before purchasing.
  • (3/5)

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

    I came to this having never listened to the podcast and I don't know if that's a good thing or a bad thing. It meant I had zero expectations, but it also occasionally meant that maybe I was not as caught up in the story as I would have been had it been being performed. I also felt that it got too pointed with its message toward the end, which is super-annoying. I don't mind an allegorical story with a moral, but I do mind being beat over the head with the message and the moral, which I sadly thought this book did. I didn't hate it and I'm intrigued enough with the story and characters to check out the podcast, but nor did I love it.

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

  • (1/5)
    This novel has many shortcomings. The plot is so strange and erratic it is almost impossible to follow. It doesn’t travel an arc, but instead is a series of scenes that don’t seem well connected or to go anywhere. Although Fink seeks to create drama, suspense, and terror, most of it is contrived and too abrupt. The violence is gratuitous, reminding one of a bad action film. The characters are poorly developed and cartoonish (i.e., superheroes and evil bad guys). Their motivations are dubious and thus hard to empathize with. Even the love interest between Keisha and Alice is so unrealistic as to leave one cringing. The narrative frequently wanders into philosophizing, mostly about overly simplistic ideas of good and evil. The settings are treated superficially because they come and go so rapidly. It was hard to maintain interest in all the craziness and thus the book took far too long to finish. Often tempted to quit, I kept at it to the bitter end seeking some insights that may not have been obvious, but alas, the ending seemed just as contrived and overly melodramatic as the rest of the novel.
  • (1/5)
    Pretty much a garbage book. It sucks in every way imaginable