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Schindler's List

Schindler's List

Escrito por Thomas Keneally

Narrado por Humphrey Bower


Schindler's List

Escrito por Thomas Keneally

Narrado por Humphrey Bower

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (84 valoraciones)
Longitud:
16 horas
Publicado:
Dec 4, 2018
ISBN:
9781508250968
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

The acclaimed bestselling classic of Holocaust literature, winner of the Booker Prize and the Los Angeles Times Book Award for Fiction, and the inspiration for the classic film—"a masterful account of the growth of the human soul" (Los Angeles Times Book Review).

A stunning novel based on the true story of how German war profiteer and factory director Oskar Schindler came to save more Jews from the gas chambers than any other single person during World War II. In this milestone of Holocaust literature, Thomas Keneally, author of Daughter of Mars, uses the actual testimony of the Schindlerjuden—Schindler's Jews—to brilliantly portray the courage and cunning of a good man in the midst of unspeakable evil.

Publicado:
Dec 4, 2018
ISBN:
9781508250968
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Sobre el autor

Thomas Keneally (b. 1935) is an Australian author of fiction, nonfiction, and plays, best known for his novel Schindler’s List. Inspired by the true story of Oskar Schindler’s courageous rescue of more than one thousand Jews during the Holocaust, the book was adapted into a film directed by Steven Spielberg, which won the 1993 Academy Award for Best Picture. Keneally was included on the Man Booker Prize shortlist three times—for his novels The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith, Gossip from the Forest, and Confederates—before winning the award for Schindler’s List in 1982. Keneally is active in Australian politics and is a founding member of the Australian Republican Movement, a group advocating for the nation to change its governance from a constitutional monarchy to a republic. In 1983 he was named an Officer of the Order of Australia for his achievements.

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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    An incredible story, beautifully written. I don't think it could have been approached in a better way. The perfect balance of factual accounts and dialogue.
  • (4/5)
    "Whoever saves one life, saves the entire world."Oskar Schindler was an unlikely hero, a flamboyant womaniser and heavy drinker who enjoyed the good life socialising with Nazi concentration camp commanders, yet in the shadow of Auschwitz he continually risked his own life and fortune outwitting the SS to protect the lives of over a thousand Jews in Nazi-occupied Poland and Czechoslovakia.Schindler's List, is a piece of non-fiction and the author tells his story by weaving testimony from survivors who remembered the German industrialist together with Schindler's own accounts detailing how the Nazi system worked at the time and the deceptions he practised on the SS officials whom he came in to contact with to circumvent it. He was arrested on more than one occasion suspected of treasonable activity, but always managed to talk his way to freedom. I find myself really torn by this book. This is a remarkable true story that would probably never have come to life without the author's (and then later Hollywood's) intervention outside of the Jewish community which would have been a real shame. However, the largely analytical tone of the book never really seemed to do justice to the man at the centre of it. Schindler was certainly a complex man, he was a playboy, with a string of female lovers, enjoying wining and dining Nazi officials who was simultaneously venerated by the Jews sheltering under his wing, who remained alive almost because of his personal charisma and charm, bribery and cronyism. Now whilst I realise that the author was endeavouring to avoid (in his own words) 'canonizing' Schindler the tone of the novel somehow distanced him from the reader rather than really animating him. He remained an enigma to the end. An unremarkable man in peace time who in six years of war-time did remarkable things. "The principle was, death should not be entered like some snug harbour. It should be an unambiguous refusal to surrender."Keneally's 'The Playmaker' is in my top 10 all time favourites and whilst this piece of work won't be going on to that particular list the man at the centre of it deserves not to be forgotten and therefore the book deserves to be widely read which earned it an extra star.
  • (5/5)
    In my opinion one of the most important books ever written. Every step of the Jewish persecution by the Nazis seems to be discussed and seen through the eyes of those who were present. Schindler is of course fascinating for his flawed heroism. Definitely not an easy read because of the content but an important story!
  • (5/5)
    I cried so much. At the parallels I see in our current society, at the sheer horrors perpetrated in steadily increasing steps and at how humans can find a way to justify anything. The writer has done a fantastic job in finding the humanity in every character and maybe that is the most chilling part. Even the most destructive creatures of us are complex and have real motivations. This book reminded me that "the enemy is us" but also by the same token we have the power to be a friend and ally ourselves with any person to show true compassion.
  • (4/5)
    Fascinating story and a respectful approach to presenting largely factual information. Wrenching, as it should be, and well worth the read.
  • (4/5)
    Keneally writes in a very dispassionate style about the phenomenon of Schindler's factories yet still manages to convey the brutality and horror of the time through the various short stories he weaves the narrative with. A masterfully written and haunting book.
  • (4/5)
    'He who saves a single life saves the world entire.'Schindler's List is the story of Oskar Schindler who saved more Jews during the Holocaust than any other one person. Winner of the Booker Prize in 1982, it is the only lightly fictionalized account of Oskar and the many Jews he saved. While billed as fiction, Schindler's List draws heavily from the remembrances of the people who were saved by or knew Schindler as well as from Schindler's own accounts of the period. As result, it reads more like history and its style is sometimes reminiscent of a television documentary in the way the various stories told by different survivors are assembled together. Keneally charts Schindler's life from his youth until the beginning of World War II and speculates about what in Schindler's life could have predisposed him to be a person who would risk everything to save as many as he could from the Holocaust. Schindler was a man of loose morals, notorious for taking lovers and cheating on his wife and later even cheating on his lover with yet another mistress, all with little regard to hiding his unfaithfulness. Schindler moved to Cracow in Poland to make his fortune at the start of World War II, soon acquired an Enamelware factory and landed contracts to produce mess kits for the war effort. In short, at the beginning of the war Schindler was a hard-drinking unethical sort with an eye for profit and an uncanny means of knowing the right people and the right way to wheel and deal to achieve monetary gain. At the end of war, he was still the same Schindler but had used his talents and connections to save the lives of over a thousand Jews. "You'll be safe working here. If you work here, then you'll live through the war."The new women of DEF took their job instruction in a pleasant daze. It was as if some mad old Gypsy with nothing to gain had told them they would marry a count. The promise had forever altered Edith Liebgold's expectation of life. If ever they did shoot her, she would probably stand there protesting, "But the Herr Direktor said this couldn't happen."Keneally has done a fantastic job of uniting the many personal accounts and Oskar's records into a coherent and stunning narrative of Schindler's unlikely heroics. He covers the beginning stages of Schindler's friendships with Jews in Cracow, the moment in which it seems he was galvanized to act when during an Aktion in the ghetto he witnesses brutal killings taking place in front of a young girl in a bright red coat, and his eventual use of his connections and "friendships" with various and sundry SS officers to remove Jews from the brutal environment at concentration camp Plaszow for work and protection at his factory. Schindler's larger than life personality, his immense monetary resources, and his way of knowing and appropriately bribing just the right people to ensure the survival of "his" Jews are brought strikingly to life.Schindler, however, is not the sole focus of the book. Keneally contrasts life in Schindler's camp with the many heart-wrenching stories of Jewish survivors who witnessed the horrors of the Holocaust. These stories accentuated with Keneally's gripping prose, which adds a strangely poetic edge to even the most dire situation, create a fuller picture of the Holocaust in Cracow than one can get from the many Holocaust memoirs written by single survivors. There in the a pile at Wulkan's knees, the mouths of a thousand dead were represented, each one calling for him to join them by standing and flinging his grading stone across the room and declaring the tainted origin of all this precious stuff.While at times physically painful to read, Keneally's narration lays bare the Holocaust for readers and leaves no doubt as to Schindler's heroism despite his moral failings. Schindler's List is a slow and difficult read, with countless heart-breaking stories and more names and titles to keep track of than one can reasonably retain. Nonetheless, it is an incredible work which memorializes the worst of times and the heroism of one man who foresaw what would happen and chose to do something about it.
  • (4/5)
    I found this book really hard to get into at first but once the story got going, it was a little easier. There were some really interesting pieces of information about Oskar and I learned a few things about the war that I hadn't known before. Still, I think this is one of the few cases where I believe the movie is just as rewarding as the book.
  • (4/5)
    Another memorable addition to the WWII Holocaust literature. Books have been written trying to categorize those who rescued Jews at great risk to their own lives, but this was not an easy task. People from very diverse walks of life and philosophical and religious persuasions participated in acts of courage. Schlindler was as much an enigma as many of the other rescuers. A wealthy industrialist who employed Jews in his factory, Schlindler fought to the end to save them from the Nazi death camps. And yet his own life betrayed no moral standard or compelling faith that would give a clue as to the reasons for his actions. Did it begin as a dangerous, thrilling game he played and then turn into something finer as he connected with his Jews? We may never know, but are grateful to him and the many others who gave light during that very dark time.
  • (4/5)
    A remarkable tale of how one man, who was by no means leading a virtuous lifestyle, became a hero to the thousand he saved from death. The story is indeed wonderful, all the more so because it's true, but at times I found it a little dry to read. Harsh, I know.
  • (5/5)
    Having seen the movie many times, I couldn't wait to get the book and read it. To my pleasant suprise, the book was phenomenal. While the movie does not hold perfectly true to the book (what do you want, it is a "based on the book" movie), the book explains deeper things that were eluded to in the movie. For example, Circumstance A occurs in the movie. As a movie watcher, you just take Circumstance A at face value as simply being part of the story. Well, the book expains completely what Circumstance A actually is. This made reading the book that much more pleasurable as it served as more of a companion to the movie than a carbon copy of the movie. The book also explains Schindler's emotional feelings better than what is portrayed in the movie. Recommended reading for anyone who has seen this movie and appreciated it.
  • (3/5)
    Oskar Schindler was a German industrialist who saved thousands of Jewish people from death in World War II Poland. His story is well known, thanks to the film adaptation of this book. The book is a realistic, factual, stark portrayal of real human drama. Keneally portrays Oskar as a compassionate savior, but not a saint. He was a womanizer and a heavy drinker. After witnessing violence in a Polish ghetto, he was moved to establish a camp on the premises of his factory, with better conditions for his workers. Still, his workers were not immune to the random acts of violence and murder. During the last year or so of the war, through deft negotiation and subterfuge, he managed to transport thousands of Jews to safety, ensuring their liberation when the war came to an end. Even though I've read several books about the holocaust, I've been able to distance myself from the reality -- not denying these events occurred, but not facing the brutality, either. This book was different. I'm sure my mind was not as graphic as the film, and I unconsciously protected myself from the worst of it, but I still had to take frequent breaks. There were so many individual, heartbreaking stories; I found myself wondering how it could be classified as fiction. The author's note reads, "To use the texture and devices of a novel to tell a true story is a course which has frequently been followed in modern writing. It is the one I have chosen to follow here; both because the craft of the novelist is the only craft to which I can lay claim, and because the novel's techniques seem suited for a character of such ambiguity and magnitude as Oskar. I have attempted to avoid all fiction, though, since fiction would debase the record, and to distinguish between the reality and myths which are likely to attach themselves to a man of Oskar's stature. Sometimes it has been necessary to attempt to reconstruct conversations of which Oskar and others have left only the briefest record. But most exchanges and conversations, and all events, are based on the detailed recollections of the Schindlerjuden (Schindler Jews), of Schindler himself, and of other witnesses to Oskar's acts of outrageous rescue. " Seems like nonfiction to me ...I suspect this book won the Booker Prize more on the basis of Schindler's story; the writing itself was not as fine as I'd hoped. And Keneally was rather repetitive regarding Schindler's appetite for women and alcohol. Was he portraying him as "merely human," or admiring him? I found it tiresome, so a book I would normally have rated 4 stars ended up with only 3.
  • (4/5)
    I read this simply because I’d seen the movie and was impressed by the story and wanted to find out more. The book while written as a novel, was constructed from recollections and records of real events…only private conversations were reconstructed by the author. In saying this though, it was presented in a factual and largely chronological way, and not really dramatised. The story was dramatic in itself, but there wasn’t anything to make you sympathise particularly with Oskar Schindler, the hero of this tale. So I found it a little more challenging to read than I’d expected. Also there were a lot of German military and SS rank names written in German throughout the book which were a virtual mouthful, and along with Polish place names and so on, it took a bit of concentration.The story itself though….amazing. I don’t think I will ever understand how these events really happened, and how such beliefs (towards the Jews) were ever able to take hold, and at a time not so very long ago.Recommended.
  • (5/5)
    This powerful novel evokes strong emotion in the telling of Oskar Schindler's story. Whether or not you've seen the movie, this novel is a "must read," as it gives background information into what made Oskar, a German, decide to risk his life for over 4 yrs. and 3 arrests to protect over 1000 Jews from being placed into concentration camps.
  • (4/5)
    Most people have come to know this book via Steven Spielberg's famous 1993 movie version, Schindler's List which won countless awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Original Score, Best Film Editing, Best Cinematography and Best Art Direction at the Academy Awards, though I refused to see it at the cinema when it was released and have never seen it since either, even though it is often listed among the greatest films ever made. Stories about the holocaust have always been very difficult for me to deal with, no doubt largely because of the fact that I was exposed to holocaust material at an early age growing up in Israel for a few years, where the message is "Never Forget" and the holocaust images I was exposed to as a young girl were seared into my brain and indeed never forgotten. I don't think I would have ever picked up the book either, if I hadn't become a Folio Society collector; which are beautiful high quality hardcover illustrated books, and fallen in love with the drawing style of Tim Laing, who has illustrated several Folio Society editions, namely of a trio of John Le Carré books. His realistic pencil drawing style was highly inspirational to me as an artist and I was moved to communicate by email with him directly to ask him for some professional tips which he was kind enough to share with me. When I later discovered FS had published Schindler's Ark in 2009 and that it was also illustrated by Tim Laing, I simply had to have it. Then a friend from the Folio Society Devotees picked it out for me and of course I couldn't refuse her.The book tells a tale that begins with the larger than life Oskar Schindler, who at the onset of WWII and in the prime of his early thirties is an extremely successful and wealthy industrialist, as well as a well-connected Nazi party member. Schindler is described as a bon-vivant who was handsome, with a strong build, who though married, was an unrepentant womanizer and entertained at least three simultaneous love affairs. He also drank heavily with his business and government contacts—which as the war evolved were more often than not one and the same—but no matter how much alcohol he imbibed, his faculties were never impaired and he never showed signs of inebriation, a quality which was going to serve him well in his often delicate and dangerous dealings. Schindler was a German from the Czech region, and he was living in the Polish town of Kraków for his business dealings, where he had a factory, Deutsche Emaillewaren-Fabrik, commonly known as "Emalia", which initially produced enamelware in the form of kitchenware, but Schindler's connections in the Wehrmacht and its Armaments Inspectorate enabled him to obtain contracts to produce enamel cookware for the military. At this time, the Jewish population of Kraków was forced to move into cramped conditions in a ghetto, from which they were eventually to be deported to work camps and concentration camps. To help as many Jews as possible over the war years, Schindler hired as many Jews in his factory as he could—which often meant they were saved from being deported to concentration camps, being useful to the Germans—though usually having to resort to very expensive black market bribes and ruses, especially when a work camp was created outside Kraków and the ghetto was liquidated. Schindler then took many extraordinary steps which would prove both to the Jews and the Germans he was intent on helping the Jews. The Germans let him get away with it because of his important connections and the extravagant bribes he paid to the right people, though he did land in jail at great risk to his life more than once. The commandant of the work camp at Plazów where the ghetto residents who survived the ghetto exile were transported was called Amon Goeth. This man was a sadistic maniac who was in the habit of randomly executing his prisoners on the slightest pretext, though often without the least provocation and was all too happy to follow orders to feed his charges as little as possible. This situation caused Schindler to create a work camp on the grounds of his factory where he could insure the Jews he employed would at least have enough food to eat and have decent chances to survive the war. Then when the work camps in that region were about to be closed down following orders from Berlin and the prisoners were slated to be sent to the death camps, Schindler arranged for his factory to be moved to Brünnlitz in the Czech republic, and this is how Schindler's List of 1,200 Jews was created, naming the Jews who were to be sent over to this new factory and spared the gas chambers. This is a gripping book and is in many ways a page-turner. Oscar Schindler himself is a fascinating character, and his nemesis Amon Goeth and many of the other characters who people the story seem larger than life and make for thrilling reading. There are many passages in the book which are deeply disturbing, especially when one stops to consider that all the material in the novel is based on facts and on the countless interviews Thomas Keneally had with Schindlerjuden ("Schindler Jews") around the world, and whoever else was willing to talk to him. For those who are sensitive to graphic violence, as I am, there are many description of the abuses done to the Jews by the Nazis and the deeply antisemitic Poles. What makes the book bearable is that all through the narrative there are the tale of individuals whose acts of survival and courage enabled a large group of people to live through the madness of the holocaust. One could take the view that the horrors inflicted on the Jews during WWII continue to this day in various iterations on various ethnic groups and be discouraged by that fact, but then we could also take some small comfort from knowing that there will always some who try their best to help those in need, even in the worst circumstances. I do intend to watch the movie now I've broken the ice and have read the story. A friend told me the movie ends on a very hopeful note, and that past the mid-point, when the horrors of the Nazis have been shown, things become much brighter with the mission to save the Jews taking over. I guess I'll only find out once I see the movie myself, but he book presents another reality. While it's true enough Schindler did in fact save over one thousand Jews, the book presents the entire process as being filled with danger and anguish for all who had the most to lose, right until the end. In fact, Schindler himself did not come out of the war without suffering some loss. Escaping from the camp at Brünnlitz mere hours before the Russians were due to arrive (when he would have been shot as a German and a Nazi), a diamond (or a quantity of diamonds, according to the book) had been hidden in the upholstery of his car, but this was stripped and stolen shortly after so that Schindler was penniless from then on, and somehow was never quite able to recoup his fortune or find his direction in the years following the war, until his death in 1974. However, he always stayed in contact with his Schindlerjuden throughout the world and was supported morally and financially by the Jewish community, and made frequent travels to Israel, where he was named Righteous Among the Nations by the Israeli government in 1963.
  • (5/5)
    Powerful and moving, Schindler’s Ark* details Oskar Schindler’s almost mythic rescue of over a thousand Polish Jews during the holocaust. An entrepreneur and war-profiteer, Schindler’s ‘befriending’ of Plaszów's commandant Amon Goeth allowed him to first build his business, and then manoeuvre it into a haven for Jews against the Nazi death machine. Schindler maintained a business-crippling system of bribes, wining and dining Goeth and his ilk, with the help of only a few sympathetic supporters, took in Jews both skilled and unskilled, feeding them through the black market and promising to see them through the war and ‘five minutes after’… and accomplished this literally death-defying coup under the nose of the SS, despite a number of arrests.Keneally’s biography is of Schindler and Goeth, and the people whose stories most closely intersected with theirs. He lends it no melodrama or sentimentality, letting the story, the humanity, and the background information of German military history build for the reader a sense of astonishment, horror, gratitude and triumph.*Filmed and published outside the UK as Schindler’s List
  • (4/5)
    I've read Keneally's The Great Shame, and I thought I ought to pick up this, his most famous work. It is as chilling and well-written as expected, and, since its scope is more focused, easier to follow than The Great Shame. The story is fascinating, even if one already knows the broad strokes.The reader on the Recorded Book audiobook is excellent, with what this French-speaker can only guess is authentic German and Polish pronunciation, and an aloof suavity that accords perfectly with the precision and detached judgment of the text.
  • (5/5)
    Great, although depressing, book about Schindler and his transformation from greedy businessman to risking his life for his Jewish workers.
  • (5/5)
    This book tackles a huge subject and keeps the reader involved thoughout a gripping read that is not spoiled by the fact that the film made of it is the reasson people know of it.
  • (5/5)
    Seriously what can I say about this book? IT IS AMAZING. If you haven't read it, have you been under a rock your whole life? The book is heavy but so interesting and the movie is great too. So if you're not much of a reader, watch the movie.
  • (3/5)
    I struggled with this book. It's not the subject matter that I had issues with- Schindler's story is important, and what he did for the people he saved during the Holocaust is huge. I was not impressed with the writing, though. I was expecting a novelized history, but this seemed like a long and jumbled history paper until the last chapters, which redeemed the book for me.
  • (5/5)
    This is a story of a man, Direktor Oskar Schindler, a real person, a German industrialist in World War 2, it reads like nonfiction but it is historical fiction. Yes, it is about the Jews, the labor camps, the tragedy but it is more about how Schindler, a capitalist, survived the war and how his decisions saved Jews. Oscar wasn't a saint, he was a womanizer, a drinker and he excelled at making deals. Why he did what he did is never known. He used Jewish labor but his actions saved many and he never abused his labor. His actions placed him in danger, yet he never stopped until the end.I enjoyed reading the book. Most have seen the movie. I have not. I avoid violence in movies and expect that this would be hard to watch. The author is Australian. The book won the Booker Prize. The author was inspired to write this story of Schindler when he met Poldek Pfefferberg. I was struck by the honor the Jewish nation gave to Schindler in making him a Righteous Person and also trying to help him financial too. Why did and do people hate Jewish people? Through the years they have been hated, why? Is it because they are God's special people and they hate God?
  • (5/5)
    In the shadow of Auschwitz, a flamboyant German industrialist grew into a living legend to the Jews of Cracow. He was a womaniser and heavy drinker who enjoyed the good life, yet to them he became a saviour.Thomas Keneally's Booker Prize-winning novel recreates the story of Oskar Schindler, an Aryan who risked his life to protect Jews in Nazi-occupied Poland, who continually defied and outwitted the SS, and who was transformed by the war into an angel of mercy. It is an unforgettable tale, all the more extraordinary for being true.
  • (4/5)
    A haunting account of the true story of the Jews rescued by Oskar Schindler during the Second World War. Moments of extreme heroism and courage, coupled with demonstrations of the depths of cruelty to which humans can stoop, show the range of human experience and emotion.I would suggest this is one of those books everyone should read, not only for its craftsmanship, but also for the events it witnesses.
  • (3/5)
    A famous movie, I didn't want to watch it until I had read the book. Keneally isn't a brilliant writer, but Schindler's List seems well-researched. It was easy to read without being overly simple.

    Throughout the book, I was confused by Oskar Schindler, the man. What were his motivations? Did he draw a moral line in the sand, refusing to pass a certain point of complicity? Was he mainly a businessman who tried to use the war to his advantage? Or was he perhaps just hung over half the time and drunk the other half, and therefore never in a truly clear state of mind?

    At the end of the book, his wife is quoted as having said in a documentary that Schindler didn't do anything remarkable before the war, and he didn't do anything remarkable afterwards either. I think this says it best. That particular situation, the people in it, and the way he reacted to the events and the individuals are the reason for everything. In the end, Schindler was nothing more or less than himself.
  • (4/5)
    This is a moving and harrowing book which is difficult to review. Like Hilary Mantel's Cromwell books, the fictional elements here largely exist to fill gaps and impose narrative structure to a true story, which is now widely known, of Oskar Schindler and his schemes to protect a group of Jews in Nazi occupied Poland and Moravia. The book has a weight of detailed testimony whose cumulative effect is sombre, and its portrait of Schindler is nuanced and complex, and does not shrink from his less heroic qualities.
  • (5/5)
    I first read this in those heady days after seeing the film at the cinema. The story speaks for itself, but the tone and approach of the book differs markedly and I was a little disappointed. I think I was looking for a novelization. I was very young.Reading it again now I couldn't be more impressed with Keneally's approach. The book is full of ambiguity, a lot of it set up in the prologue where he first starts to explore the contradictions in Schindler's character. There's also ambiguity as to the nature of the book. Keneally does a tight-rope act between history and fiction. Sometimes he's almost report-like, sometimes he directly addresses the audience, giving his opinion on people and events. But then he'll segue seamlessly into fictionally described scenes with direct speech. But watch the speech marks – sometimes they're there and sometimes they're not. Sometimes he calls Schindler Herr Schindler, Herr Direktor, sometimes Schindler, sometimes Oskar. Cycling between formality and informality. But he usually calls him Schindler. He's on the fence. But which is more formal: history or fiction? Surely history with all it's research and facts, and fiction is just a game between friends. But then perhaps history is just a story we tell ourselves about the past. The Greeks made up whole speeches when they wrote their histories, but historians aren't allowed to do that now, and fiction writers, once so chatty with their readers, have tied their voices down and strive for suspended disbelief by obeying a set of ridiculous rules that everyone tacitly agrees with.All that got me thinking about the Holocaust. Formality and informality, personal and impersonal. Because here you have a vast state-operated killing machine where there are no personal names, only one name Jew. No individual trials, only group condemnation and murder. Pretty impersonal, but yet how more personal can you get, where people, on purpose, first steal everything you have, then imprison you, then murder your family in front of you and finally murder you?
  • (3/5)
    Had to read in sections because there waere so many names to process. I enjoyed the film more.
  • (5/5)
    An extremely interesting book. It was fascinating to learn about who Schindler was and what he did.
  • (2/5)
    kinda boring