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Zora and Me: The Cursed Ground

Zora and Me: The Cursed Ground

Escrito por T.R. Simon

Narrado por Channie Waites


Zora and Me: The Cursed Ground

Escrito por T.R. Simon

Narrado por Channie Waites

valoraciones:
4/5 (6 valoraciones)
Longitud:
6 horas
Publicado:
Sep 11, 2018
ISBN:
9781978644717
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

A powerful fictionalized account of Zora Neale Hurston's childhood adventures explores the idea of collective memory and the lingering effects of slavery.

"History ain't in a book, especially when it comes to folks like us. History is in the lives we lived and the stories we tell each other about those lives."

When Zora Neale Hurston and her best friend, Carrie Brown, discover that the town mute can speak after all, they think they've uncovered a big secret. But Mr. Polk's silence is just one piece of a larger puzzle that stretches back half a century to the tragic story of an enslaved girl named Lucia. As Zora's curiosity leads a reluctant Carrie deeper into the mystery, the story unfolds through alternating narratives. Lucia's struggle for freedom resonates through the years, threatening the future of America's first incorporated black township—the hometown of author Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960). In a riveting coming-of-age tale, award-winning author T. R. Simon champions the strength of a people to stand up for justice.

Publicado:
Sep 11, 2018
ISBN:
9781978644717
Formato:
Audiolibro


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6 valoraciones / 5 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    The Carrie/Zora portion of the story likely would have been a richer experience had I read the first book in this series with the introduction of their characters and their friendship, otherwise, there’s no problem reading this as a standalone. The Cursed Ground is told in dual timelines, 1903 and 1855. The start of each chapter makes it clear which era you’re in so there’s never any confusion. I enjoyed how zealous and curious Zora (based on real-life author Zora Neale Hurston) is, and twelve year old Carrie’s burgeoning feelings for her friend Teddy (there isn’t a big romance so readers not into that need not worry), felt realistic with the mix of embarrassment and excitement bubbling inside her. I also liked that the adult characters rarely talk down to these girls, if I were a kid reader, it’s an aspect of the storytelling I’d appreciate, especially when it comes to the very necessary conversations about race. I didn’t feel like I got to know best friends Carrie and Zora quite as well as I did the other heroine, Lucia in 1855, though that’s understandable given that while Carrie and Zora are very concerned about what’s going on in their small community and bravely insert themselves into the mystery, they’re still somewhat apart from it, whereas with Lucia, the reader is right there with her as she endures sudden enslavement with the cruelty and all too few moments of tenderness that follow, as well as the complicated turns a close relationship takes, so Lucia’s timeline can’t help but feel more personal, more involving. With slavery and a couple animal situations, this is sometimes an emotionally difficult read as it should be given the subject matter, don’t be surprised if it elicits a tear or two. I received this book through a giveaway.
  • (3/5)
    This was an ok book for upper elementary to middle school students. I am not sure why Zora Neale Hurston is included. Yes, the book is set primarily in Eatonville, Fl., but it really has nothing to do with Zora. Zora isn't the narrator, so it seems a bit gratuitous to me. Slavery was a horrible, horrible thing; that is not up for debate. However, I feel that the author was a bit heavy handed in discussing it, especially for the targeted audience. Characters repeatedly wondered how humans could own other humans, and a white man talks about how all white men are racist and the good ones have to work to overcome their inborn racism. I think students could figure this out for themselves given the events in the book. There are some beautifully written passages, but the above-mentioned aspects detract from the overall impact of the book. Also, the narrator keeps referring to a previous murder they helped solve; is this the second in a series?* I received this as ARC
  • (4/5)
    'Zora' is the influential Harlem Renaissance writer Zora Neale Hurston. This is a fictional story featuring a believable young Zora and her friend, growing up in the actual all-black town of Eatonville where the writer lived as a girl. I enjoyed the mystery that is revealed, and the way that history is shown to have a very present impact.
  • (5/5)
    10 Show moreReviewA story rooted in the childhood of a remarkable author, Zora Neale Hurston, and while it is a fictionalized account, Zora and Me: The Cursed Ground is nonetheless a remarkable tribute. In the very early part of the 20th century, hatred, prejudice, and entitlement still embodied many a white man. Although slavery had been abolished, the clash and divide between those of color and the white man was alive and thriving in some parts. Zora and her friend Carrie are witness to some of these injustices, as a mute landowner in Florida is being threatened and harassed to give up his rightfully owned land. And, in 1903, the notion of someone having more rights than others, was apparent. However, many who believed that an injustice was about to occur, step up to defend an honest man. As Zora and Carrie observe the confrontation clandestinely, they become privy to some long-held secrets which centered around slaves and their master. And, there are some very surprising connections to people in the story. This is a well written story which young readers hopefully will be appalled at. Yet, it is a story that should be told. I give it 4 1/2 stars. Thank you to LibraryThing Early Reviewers, Candlewick Press, and T.R. Simon for this ARC.
  • (4/5)
    I received a free advanced copy of this book from the LibraryThing Early Reviewers giveaway in exchange for an honest review. This is a powerful, well written historical fiction/mystery story that follows a fictionalized young Zora Neal Hurston as her and her friends find out some dark secrets about some of the adults in their town that are coming back to haunt them. The story is narrated by Zora’s best friend Carrie and begins at the turn of the 20th century with the pair finding the town mute Mr. Polk in trouble with a white landowner. The narrative then alternates between Zora and Carrie in 1903 and the story of Lucia who is a slave girl on a Florida plantation half a century earlier. The more we find out about Lucia, the more we learn that she’s a piece of the puzzle to help solve the problems surrounding Mr. Polk and the other residents in Zora’s home of Eatonville, FL, which was the first black incorporated town in America. While a young Zora Neal Hurston is a main character of the book, the story deals more with the treatment of African Americans in the early 1900s and the horrors of slavery than the life of Hurston. Through Zora and Carrie’s thoughtful reflections on some of the terrible things they hear about the Eatonville residents who were born slaves (ex: whippings, families being sold apart, etc.), there’s some great discussions on the mentality and moral character of white landowners who could live with their cruel actions after abusing their slaves and treating them as property instead of people. Overall, even if young readers don’t know who Zora Neal Hurston is, this is a well written historical mystery, especially to tie in to a lesson on the terrible history and legacy of slavery. I also didn’t know until after I finished that this is a sequel. You do not have to read the first to enjoy this story and I enjoyed this one so much I will be reading the first.