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El hombre de la mascara de Hierro: La ultima aventura de los tres mosqueteros

El hombre de la mascara de Hierro: La ultima aventura de los tres mosqueteros

Escrito por Alejandro Dumas

Narrado por Full Cast


El hombre de la mascara de Hierro: La ultima aventura de los tres mosqueteros

Escrito por Alejandro Dumas

Narrado por Full Cast

valoraciones:
3.5/5 (14 valoraciones)
Longitud:
2 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jun 15, 2007
ISBN:
9781611540574
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

El Hombre de la Mascara de Hierro
de Alejandro Dumas

La última aventura de los Tres Mosqueteros

FonoLibro se enorgullece en presentar el audio libro en español de la última aventura de los tres mosqueteros, “El Hombre de la Mascara de Hierro” original de Alejandro Dumas.

Los veteranos mosqueteros Aramis y Portos, traman un plan para derrocar al inepto y corrupto Rey Luís XIV de su trono y poner en su lugar a su hermano gemelo Felipe, quien se encuentra injustamente encarcelado dentro del castillo de la Bastilla.

Los tres mosqueteros y Dartañan se encuentran en el centro de un conflicto que no sólo pone en juego su amistad de toda la vida, sino también el trono de Francia.

FonoLibro presenta una obra maestra en audio libro que con un elenco completo, música y efectos de sonido te hace vivir la grandiosa aventura de los tres mosqueteros.
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jun 15, 2007
ISBN:
9781611540574
Formato:
Audiolibro

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3.6
14 valoraciones / 12 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    I was surprised that the book was very different from the movie! It is the tale of the failed attempt on the part of two former musketeers to place the identical twin on the throne of Louis XIV. All of this takes place in the first few chapters and the rest is Louis getting even.
  • (1/5)
    The first part of the volume is actually quite good with many tense and interesting scenes. Something of an antidote to the boring padding that marrs the earlier volumes, but there is nothing to justify making his readers suffer through those sub-standard sub-plots. There is some ropey writing, especially where he's overly earnest in bewailing the deaths of characters that, despite the 2000 pages of this long novel, he's not taken the time to really make us care about. While I can understand why this is the only commonly read section of the Musketeers' saga after The Three Musketeers, my main emotion on finishing it was relief.
  • (4/5)
    First I must admit that even though I've seen a few movie renditions, this is the first time I've read this book. Furthermore, this is the first book I've read by Dumas…and it is kind of a strange place to start considering this is the ending of one of his famous series.The first thing I noticed about the writing was that it was VERY detailed. Not only in terms of descriptions but also in terms of the character and political development. I quickly found myself overwhelmed with dozens of names, roles and relationships (personal and political) throughout France and neighboring countries. It was dizzying to try to keep them all straight, especially considering a number of similar names as well as the habit of referring to some people by different names at different times (sometimes by their common name, sometimes by their political/professional title). After a while, I sank in and was able to keep at least the principal characters straight. and I got caught up in the intriguing machinations that were unfolding.Having seen two movie versions, I felt like I had a good feel for what to expect from the plot. However, it quickly became apparent that the movie versions I've seen (and from what I can tell, this is true of most of the movie versions out there) are rather different from the novel.Interestingly, the story of the "man in the iron mask" is only a small portion of the overall plot of this particular book. And that plot segment unravels itself through the first third of the book and then disappears completely. In the movie versions, the way the "iron mask" plot ends is strikingly different from what happens in the book. The remaining half+ of the book has nothing to do with the "man in the iron mask" (except for the consequences of the plot) and instead follows the famous musketeers to the ends of their careers/lives.It was still adventurous and a lot of fun…but was different from what I expected. So, now that I know that I shouldn't compare the book to the movie at all, and feeling more comfortable with the characters and plot…I am able to look back over the book as a whole in an entirely different light. As I said, the writing was very detailed. In some cases it felt like the details were a littler superfluous and over the top, but mostly I found it very immersive to be provided with that level of detail. Some of the characters felt a bit stereotypical but the main characters were unique and intriguing. They had significant depth which provided them with believable motivations to their various actions and dialog. The one exception I saw was the prince in the scene where he was anticipating D'Artangan's every action. We had previously been given to expect the prince to be incapable of strategic planning or foresight and suddenly we find him anticipating the motivations and reactions of a thoughtful and strategic man. To me, that was a bit of a stretch. I can discount it a bit based on the other character who was feeding the prince with various ideas and can thus attribute the insight to this other character (being vague to try and avoid spoilers).I really found myself enjoying the overall story. The "man in the iron mask" portion was very interesting and fun. I was shocked to see it end so different from the movies, but it felt more natural and believable. Then to have so much adventure after that plot arc, I had a ton of fun. While the intrigue and machinations of carrying out the "iron mask" plot were fun and intriguing, I'd heard/scene them so often that they became commonplace. Thus, the adventure that happened after the "iron mask" was fresh to me and that made it so much more fun.Overall I will admit that, if this book is any indication, Dumas is a heavy read. This book was filled with very detailed accounts of places, people, politics and other comings and goings of France. This was both a joy and a hindrance at times. There were moments when I felt bogged down by the text, but mostly I really enjoyed the vivid experience and the immense detail I was given. I probably should have started with the first book in the series ("The Three Musketeers") but I was familiar enough with the characters that it worked out all right. Even though he's a heavy read that took me a while to get through, I will definitely seek out and read more Dumas in the future.****4 out of 5 stars
  • (4/5)
    This is the third and final episode of the Musketeers story. At the start of the book the musketeers are still in their glory. D’Artagnan is the captain of the Musketeers and has the confidence of the king, Louis XIV. Aramis is a high-ranking churchman (and in fact is the head of a secret society within the church). Porthos is wealthy and still a strongman. Athos is a Count and has the only child, Raoul, whom he adores. Raoul is also beloved by the three other musketeers. Unfortunately, Raoul has had his heart broken and is desperately unhappy. His fiancé fell in love with the King and became his mistress.The title character really plays a minor role in the story. He is the twin brother of Louis XIV but he has been hidden away by his parents so that the succession will not be in doubt. Aramis has learned of his existence as a prisoner in the Bastille and conceives a scheme to free him and substitute him for his brother. This would give Aramis control over the King of France and allow him to achieve his ultimate aim, the papacy. Aramis involves Porthos in the scheme but not the other two since he knows they would not go along with it.The scheme fails and Aramis and Porthos must flee. They take refuge at Belle-Isle, an island off France near Nantes. The King orders D’Artagnan to capture them which puts D’Artagnan in quite a quandary. The King has foreseen that D’Artagnan will try to help his friends and prevents him being able to. D’Artagnan returns to the King to tender his resignation and while he is away from Belle-Isle the troops capture it. Aramis and Porthos try to get away in a small boat but in the ensuing fight Porthos is killed. Aramis does manage to escape to Spain.Meanwhile, Athos and Raoul have parted because Raoul has joined the army to fight in Algeria. Athos knows Raoul intends to seek death and he declines physically and mentally waiting for word. When it comes and Raoul is confirmed dead Athos dies as well.Four years later D’Artagnan (who did not end up resigning) goes to war for France against the Dutch. He is promised to be made a Marshal if his troops do well. At the moment he receives word that he has been made Marshal he is killed.Thus of the four, only Aramis is left at the end of the book. According to the afterword to the book Dumas intended this to show the death of chivalry and honour. It makes for a very sad ending and I wonder how this was received by the public at the time it was published.I had not read the middle book, Twenty Years After, and my recollection of the original Three Musketeers is quite dim so I’m not sure how this book compares to the others. My feeling though is that there was much more action and not so much politics and court intrigue. Maybe some day I’ll reread the first book and read the second to see how they compare.
  • (3/5)
    This one's the 5th book in the saga of the Three Musketeers--or, technically, the 3.3rd. Apparently the 3rd book published was a massive novel titled Le Vicomte de Bragelonne. Some English translations of that book, for whatever reason, were split into three novels. Anyway, in ignorance I picked up this volume, thinking it the next installment, and continued to read it after discovering my error. It didn't suffer too much for the loss, as M. Dumas gave enough backstory that I could follow along. It's the final tale of d'Artagnan, Athos, Porthos, and Aramis and their capers and intrigues with French royalty. The story was typical Dumas, with enjoyable characters and meandering plotlines. It was a bit of a downer since it was the final book of the saga. I also found the ending a bit unsatisfying--there was no "happily ever after", nor any great tragedy to wrap up the saga. It was still enjoyable reading, of course, but I kept thinking that next time I should just pick up The Three Musketeers. --J.
  • (4/5)
    And thus ends the last book of The Three Musketeers series, aka the D'artagnan Romances. Not the greatest of endings. And definitely didn't live up to all the hype and the expectations.3.5/5
  • (4/5)
    A girl in my world literature class gave a book report on this book that sounded exactly like the movie, which I had loved. I wanted to know if she was cheating so I read the book myself. Well... she was cheating. But the book was still good, if REALLY thick in 18th century French politics.
  • (4/5)
    Now that’s a saga. Not this book specifically, but the whole of the d’Artagnan novels (or romances as they are often styled). I can hardly organize my thoughts because the end affected me so much. I cried. Seriously. This is only the third book to ever make me cry (counting Of Mice and Men which really shouldn't...it makes everyone cry, doesn’t it?)Spoilers. I came to this section of the story with preconceived notions of what the story would be. Not from any one source, but from this novel’s reputation in general. I thought there would be a lot more about the twins, the switch and the repercussions of that switch. Strangely, it is all over and done with very quickly. Fouquet spoils everything by being an idiot and Aramis and Porthos have to literally run for their lives. Phillippe is put into yet another prison and is never heard of again. It was so strange. I kept expecting d’Artagnan to spring the guy or something, but no, he deposits him on the island, mask in place and that’s it. The rest of the story is about Fouquet’s downfall, Louis’s perfection of his power and what happens to the four as a result.Their friendship is one to end all friendships. Porthos forgives Aramis for his duplicity. Athos wastes away with Raoul gone. Aramis schemes mightily to get them out of their predicament. d’Artagnan’s attempts to save them are thwarted by Louis’s counter-orders and secret spies. It’s painful to watch. Especially since I really wanted (and expected) them to retire into old age in one of Porthos’s estates, sipping Alsace wine and talking about the glory days. OMG I was not prepared for what an absolute downer the whole ending was. I had tears streaming down my face for all of the deaths. Especially Porthos’s since his was one of such sacrifice and his character was so much larger than life. At the very end I had the urge to go right back to The Three Musketeers and start all over again.
  • (4/5)
    The third book about the four musketeers is usually split into three parts, of which this is the last. Do not be misled by the Hollywood adaptations of this book, it's still a story of political intrigue, rather than an adventure novel. It marks the end of the adventures of our four heroes.
  • (3/5)
    back in the days Leo was cool I guess I thought it was cool to read this book. I was into it, but it isnt the best Dumas and its very comical/goofy. made for my age at the time 11-13.
  • (2/5)
    Well, that was a real downer. People die, noble plots are thwarted, good men are sent to prison. The title is a little misleading, because surprisingly little of the book is about said man - the brother of the king, whom Aramis tries to install in his place from the very first chapter. I still love all four Musketeers, but this story seemed less about them and more about French politics. I think. To be honest, I had a lot of trouble following it. I kept confusing people, especially since most of the noblemen had two or three names each. It was nice to rejoin Athos, Aramis, Porthos, and d'Artagnan, but I would have rather spent the time with them off on adventures, and not as old men who barely see each other anymore. I suppose it's not a bad way to round off your Musketeer collection, but definitely don't start here.This translation was not so great. I'm not convinced, even in Dumas's time, that people would say "What does that signify?" instead of "What does that mean?" or "Do you comprehend?" instead of "Do you understand?" It made everything sound stilted and weird.
  • (5/5)
    Having finally read the entire series, I found that I liked this final section even more. Some sections that I previously thought a bit dull or unrelated I now realize where the continuation or wrapping up of things that had happened previously. Several of the relationships, such as that between Raoul & Louise, are not at all clear if you read this as a stand-alone but make perfect sense having read the previous parts of "Vicomte de Bragelonne; or Ten Years Later". However the book is still a fun read even lacking the nuances of these relations as long as you know "The Three Musketeers" 4 main characters.One thing I had forgotten was how sad this book ends up being. I was feeling a bit annoyed in the middle that Louis XIV wasn't left in the Bastille and Phillipe on the throne, especially after Louis behaviour towards Fouquet in the second half of the book. But upon reflection, Dumas chose the more realistic path and allowed the characters to show their sense of honor or lack thereof. I remain saddened by the division between the 4 friends which is only partially healed in the end. Poor Aramis tried to become another Richelieu and failed. It is interesting the the musketeer who started off as the most devout ended up being the most corrupted by ambition while the one who started off with the most ambition ended up the most dutiful to his moral obligations. So sad that d'Artagnan dies just as he is about to achieve the one ambition left to him!For those unaware, Dumas' mammoth third book in the d'Artagnan series ("Vicomte de Bragelonne; or Ten Years Later") is generally divided into several volumes, most commonly 3 or 4. Unfortunately, these volumes usually have the same name even though they cover slightly different material. This book is covers the material in the 4th volume of a 4 volume edition. I also listened to the Blackstone audiobook edition narrated by Simon Vance which is the final volume of a 3 volume edition (and also a slightly different translation although the translation information is not provided). For those wanting to read this classic as a stand-alone, I would recommend the 4 volume edition -- the 3 volume edition contains about 30% more material at the beginning (covered in my 3rd volume "Louise de la Valliere") which only minimally helps understand the relationships I mentioned above and lacks the adventure and action of the first & last parts.