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The Wind in the Willows: Classic Tales Edition

The Wind in the Willows: Classic Tales Edition

Escrito por Kenneth Grahame

Narrado por B.J. Harrison


The Wind in the Willows: Classic Tales Edition

Escrito por Kenneth Grahame

Narrado por B.J. Harrison

valoraciones:
4/5 (135 valoraciones)
Longitud:
6 horas
Publicado:
Feb 16, 2016
ISBN:
9781937091385
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Come on a merry adventure down the jolly highway! Join the unquenchable Toad, the kindly Mole, the steadfast Water Rat, and the irascible Badger in their spectacularly charming adventures along the waterfront.

Each character is brought to life in this enchanting presentation of Kenneth Grahame’s seminal work of fantasy fiction. Don’t miss it!

Publicado:
Feb 16, 2016
ISBN:
9781937091385
Formato:
Audiolibro

Sobre el autor

Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932) was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. After the death of his mother and abandonment by his father, Grahame went to live with his grandmother in Berkshire, near the River Thames. He pursued his passion for writing while maintaining a career in banking. He enjoyed great success in both endeavors. The Wind in the Willows was originally written in parts and given in letter to his son.


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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    I managed to avoid somehow or other reading the complete Wind in the Willows until I was well into adulthood. Of course, it is probably impossible to escape bits of it such as Ratty's wise words...'Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats. Simply messing...."But I found myself reading the full version around the 100 year anniversary of its original publication in 1908. And, despite myself. Quite enjoyed it. There is a bit of the class struggle reflected in it with Toad representing the worst of inherited wealth and privilige and ratty the best blend of smarts and good-heartedness. But really, I didn't buy this book for the story and I already have 3 other copies of the W/W. I bought for the wonderful illustrations by Robert Ingpen. He really is a favourite illustrator of mine. And, as is pointed out in the preface, it is no mean challenge to illustrate a book where everyone has their own mental pictures of Toa's caravan, or of the wild wood, or ratty and Mole's boating expedition etc. But, to my mind, the Ingpen version is simply one of the best, His style is semi realist.....realist enough for one to enjoy the warmth of Badger's fire and the food hanging from the ceiling of his abode. (p 60-61). It doesn't do to be too critical however; Badger's kitchen is true to the text with the glow and the warmth of the fire-lit kitchen whereas a REAK Badger's lair would be pitch black and maybe damp and certainly smelly. There is so much fun detail in Inpen's paintings. (I assume they are watercolour) but not quite sure. And they fade into a blurriness that hints at more details but just not enough to resolve. His draftsmanship is superb and he manages to faithfully portray the various animals whilst bestowing a pleasing familiarity upon them. I don't know how many illustrations there are in the book but did a quick sample count and it averages out at 7.5 illustrations per 10 pages. That is a wealth of illustration and fit makes the book a delight to read to children. Some of my favourite illustrations are of mole in the wild wood with the rabbit p 50; Badger leading Rat and Mole through underground passageways p76; Rat and Mole in the rowing boat just prior to dawn p121; the weasels, armed to the teeth attacking Toad hall.....p195. But these are just a few of the absolute gems in the book. Strongly recommend it.
  • (4/5)
    Not necessarily an avid children's book reader beyond my trusty Hardy Boys....but i recently saw a local community theater production of this, and in between the time i purchased the ticket and actually saw the play, this book showed up in a box of odds and ends someone gave me.....it seemed like fate was telling me to read it....So i did! And what a beautifully illustrated work this is. The fantastical world of these animals came to life for my stifled and stiff brain so much more so than had it not been just littered from end to end with gorgeous vivid drawings in both Black & White and Color
  • (4/5)
    The Wind in the Willows is as daffy and charming as it must have seemed when it was first published in 1908. Kenneth Grahame’s classic children’s novel follows the anthropomorphic adventures of several woodland creatures, primarily Mole, Rat, Badger, and Toad. They enjoy many pastimes, including “messing about in boats,” Christmas caroling, and driving motor cars. This last becomes Mr. Toad’s passion, landing him in all sorts of trouble and, eventually, a dungeon. The animals have many adventures along the river and in the Wild Wood, but they all love home best, where they like to cozy up in front of a fireplace and enjoy simple meals with friends. What makes the book so funny is how the animals live alongside people, doing people things, but without exciting comment. And they do it all regardless of the comparative size of things. Mole and Rat harness a horse to a gypsy caravan, field mice slice a ham and fry it for breakfast, Toad drives people cars and wears a washerwoman’s clothes to escape from prison. It is easy to see why this book remains popular. Among other claims to fame, Teddy Roosevelt said he read it several times, P.G. Wodehouse was clearly influenced by the lighthearted humor (one of his novels, Joy in the Morning, shares the same title as the carol sung by the field mice), and it shows up as one of Radcliffe's Top 100 Novels of the 20th Century. Also posted on Rose City Reader.
  • (3/5)
    This classic of children’s literature tells the adventures of four good friends – Mole, Rat, Badger and Toad – living on the edge of The Wild Wood. Toad is the most vexing animal! He’s boastful and given to hyperbole; on the other hand, he’s generous with his friends and sincerely remorseful – eventually. Fortunately for him, his friends compensate for his shortcomings. Rat is ever resourceful and a font of information. Badger is the wise old man of the wild wood – somewhat of a recluse, but gracious and eager to help when called up. And then we have the ever curious Mole who starts out the adventure and proves to be steadfast, reliable and intelligent.

    Mary Woods does a great job performing the audio book. I can see why it’s remained popular with children for over 100 years. Somehow I never read it as a child (or have no memory of it). My adult self wasn’t all that impressed, however, so it gets a respectable but not enthusiastic 3 stars.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent comfort book for when the day has been just that bad.
  • (5/5)
    A classic of children's literature. Wonderful.
  • (4/5)
    Great fun to reacquaint myself with Rat, Mole, Badger and Toad after so many years. Something was missing from the magical experience........Yes, a young child hanging off every word. Looks like one to keep for any future grand children
  • (4/5)
    The Wind in The Willows is a highly inventive, very English story about the rich spoiled Toad and his worthy friends, Rat, Mole, Badger, etc. It has become a timeless classic that appeals to all ages. This would make an ideal read aloud story for children as an adult could help with the pacing and perhaps put on interesting voices for the various characters.A morality tale that praises the value of friendship and community, this story has it’s slightly dark moments, but over all it is a gentle tale that paints a strong picture of English country life as we would all wish it to be. This very comforting read delivers it’s message in a subtle, humorous fashion helped by it’s Edwardian pastoral setting and woodland creatures who have very human characteristics.I read this book in short installments through the Daily Lit on-line site, and found myself so looking forward to my next installment that I often didn’t wait but pushed the button for immediate delivery of the next chapter.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting to revisit an old friend. The good bits are still good, but I really can't warm to toad. I kept getting distracted by wondering how they earned a living and what size they were meant to be - the disadvantage of growing up.
  • (4/5)
    The Wind in the Willows is regarded as a classic of chidlren's literature, and while it is enjoyable, I'm not sure it deserves that status. The book follows the activities (I hesitate to call some of the trivial things they engage in adventures) of four animal friends: Mole, Water Rat, Badger, and Toad. For the most part, the book follows Mole and Water Rat, who serve as stand-ins for middle-class English country gentlemen. The pair spend their days boating on the river, having very English picnic lunches and dinners, hosting poor Christmas carolers, exploring the enticing and dangerous wild wood, and trying to keep the aristocratic Toad from getting into trouble.One thing that is never clear in the book is why Mole and Water Rat are middle class, why Toad is wealthy, and why Badger is working class, although they all clearly are. The Otter family and the field mouse carolers seems to be poor as well,and the weasels and stoats are essentially poverty-stricken ruffians. No one seems to do any work in the animal worls, so it is unclear why the field mice are poor, while Mole is comfortable enough to have them all in for a bite to eat when they knock at his door. It is a mystery how Toad is able to afford the multiple cars he purchases (and wrecks) in the story. This bit of English class structure, while giving an interesting window on the state of the world in Grahame's era, makes the book more than a little dated, and probably not particularly approachable for a young reader today.For the most part, the four friends putter around doing more or less mundane things - the biggest excitement in the first half of the book is when Mole and Water Rat find and return one of the Otter children who had gotten lost. The actual adventures, such as they are, of the quartet are heavily driven by Toad and what appear to be his attempts to stave off the boredom that comes with being wealthy and idle. He steals a car, gets thrown in jail, escapes, and finds his home taken over by ruffians (Stoats and Weasels), whereupon the four friends arm themselves with clubs, pistols, and swords, and toss the trespassers out. They, of course, immediately plan a party to celebrate.The book is mostly noteworthy for its love of country living, and the unspoiled, but tamed English countryside (the river dwellers being carefully distinguished from those that live in "the wild wood"). In some ways, Grahame is a predecessor of Tolkien, wishing that a pastoral way of life would persist and not be overcome by industiralization and a breaking down of class barriers.On the whole, the book is fun, even if the doings of the protagonists range from the merely trivial to the criminal, and probably worth giving to a child to read, but I would not consider this to have the "must read" status that it has been accorded.
  • (5/5)
    When I was in the 3rd grade I chose this book for the diorama assignment.
  • (5/5)
    Perhaps this is one of the books you either love (which I do) or can leave. Charming creatures, true friendship, mostly harmless adventure where all is well that ends well for those most deserving. The lessons of life captured here are as real as any among humans while spinning "tails" of lives we can never experience. Lovely fantasy and a pleasure to read aloud to children.I recently enjoyed this again just for myself on my kindle. I highly recommend this to anyone wishing to escape to simpler times when tea by a fire or a picnic by the river watching the clouds pass by is a pleasure you seek.The adventures of Toad are a bit more exciting.Truly a classic tale somewhere between Thornton Burgess and Beatrix Potter.
  • (5/5)
    Though easily read by the young, this book should be just as relevant for adults. I cannot say it better than A. A. Milne: "One does not argue about The Wind in the Willows...The book is a test of character. We cannot criticize it, because it is criticizing us...a book which is read aloud to every new guest and is regarded as the touchstone of his worth."
  • (5/5)
    Ok, second attempt at a review after the damn interwebs ate my last one. Luckily I’m composing this one offline first.

    To me Kenneth Grahame’s _The Wind in the Willows_ is a particularly fine novel. It’s a children’s story and normally that would get my back up. I’m generally not a big fan of children’s lit or YA, and to add to this I didn’t even read this book as a child and thus have the requisite rose-coloured glasses to lend credence to my love for the story. Somehow, however, this tale of the adventures of four animal friends in an idealized and idyllic Edwardian English countryside resonated deeply with me. I think part of this has to do with the deft hand Grahame shows in the creation of his characters: shy amiable Mole, courageous and resolute Ratty (that’s Water Rat by the bye), gruff but stalwart Badger and, last but certainly not least, frivolous and vain Toad, all partake of elements of archetype and yet are never fully defined by it, they manage to emerge as characters in their own right. The setting too seems to straddle the line between generic and specific. The animal friends are constantly travelling against a background whose very names are emblematic: the River, the Wildwood, the Town and yet when we come to their homes we could not wish to find more congenial or personal places of the heart.

    Our tale (or perhaps I should say tales) begins as the shy Mole first pokes his nose out from his underground home to be presented with a newly discovered wider world he approaches with awe and wonder. I wouldn’t quite say that Mole is the main character of the stories that follow (though he is always a significant part of them), but I’ve always had a soft spot for him and enjoy seeing Grahame’s idealized English meadows, woods and countryside through his amiable eyes. Toad would probably be the more likely candidate, certainly for a good portion of the stories which concentrate on his adventures: a life-loving jester of a character with more money than brains always looking out for the next fad that is of course the fulfillment of his true heart’s desire…yet again. Indeed, keeping tabs on their friend and trying to hammer some good animal sense into his soft head is one of the major tasks the other characters must undertake in many of these tales. Grahame’s pacing is excellent, at times meandering with a leisurely pace from a boating foray on the River to spring-cleaning a much-loved home, and at others moving at breakneck speed to escape from prison or reclaim an ancestral home from dangerous enemies. Thus we follow our friends as they learn about their world and each other and I cannot say that there are many more enjoyable companions to be had for such a venture.

    I’ve seen arguments online that these stories are somewhat parochial and insular: whenever the world outside of the hedgerows intrudes it is usually either a dangerous temptation or a destructive force. I can’t really argue with this, but does all literature need to celebrate the novel and the strange? Isn’t there a place for the well-loved hearth and a joyous homecoming? _The Wind in the Willows_ is nothing if not a celebration of the comfortable and the familiar, a paen for a world and a type of beauty fading away. There may be good reasons for why it had to die out, but I would argue that there is still value in remembering it. When I try to put my finger on what it is about this book that so captures my imagination and elevates it from being merely a tale about talking animals within the context of a long-dead worldview I think that Christopher Milne, son of the author of _Winnie the Pooh_, may have said it best when he talked of “those chapters that explore human emotions – the emotions of fear, nostalgia, awe, wanderlust.” It is these parts of the book that speak directly to my heart and examine the wider aspects of the human spirit.
  • (4/5)
    This was my first time reading Wind in the Willows, although I was aware of the stories having seen different cartoon adaptations. I wish I had read this book first as a child, but the fact that this was my first reading did not make it any less enjoyable. I love all the characters, their distinct personalities and their strong friendships. The stories are varied and the lessons timeless. The characters spend quiet time in conversation, sharing meals, and taking tranquil walks along the river, they take part in boating adventures, heroic takeovers and some even resort to car-theft and gaol breakouts. I think my favorite story is Dulce Domum, where Mole realizes the joys of hearth and home. In Wayfarers All, we see a a reflection of the author himself in Rat, who is siezed by thoughts of adventure in foreign lands. Mole talks some sense into Rat and calms him down by suggesting he write some poetry, giving him a pencil - "the Rat was absorbed and deaf to the world; alternately scribbling and sucking the top of his pencil. It is true that he sucked a good deal more than he scribbled; but it was joy to the Mole to know that the cure had at least begun." Read this book if you've never read it as a child, or even if you have, read it again. The stories have a lot to offer for all ages and you are sure to come away with a different perspective as an adult.
  • (5/5)
    This actually isn't the edition I read,which cancels the reasons for writing a review. I loved the line drawings, done by a recent modern artist. I can't find the cover--it was a large format-- but so many of the other editions and art seem very charming, so what the hey. Whatever you buy or read will probably work out just fine.A very nice book, a classic, for small children and then when they can read, they will enjoy going back and reading it themselves. Older kids reading it a first time? Yeah, I can see many wouldn't like it. I think the attraction for young children, rather like the Borrowers, is the cozy underground homes with furniture and tea and toast. Animals rowing boats. At, of 4 or 5, it just still seems possible. And Ratty and Mole: best buddies, never too harsh with the other's fears or failings. These are important feelings and uh messages.
  • (5/5)
    Recently read this to my 5 year old and the Language is Just Beautiful. Although they're always calling each other "asses", which in UK English, any parent has trouble reading aloud to their kid, but it's just lovely.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorites and enjoyed again as an adult. The most beautiful prose and lyrical descriptions are to be had in this book. The animals remind us of people we know! Descriptions of the joys of home and hearth bring much enjoyment to the reader. Adventures of these whimsical animals keep the reader wanting to go and find out the endings.
  • (5/5)
    Five reasons why I love Wind in the Willows1. Playfulness: It’s pure delight when Mole decides to drop his spring cleaning and begin to enjoy a day of rest and play and leisure in the company of his new found friend, Ratty. Grahame reminds us of this essential part of “human” life, remember to take time of to enjoy life and rest and have fun. 2. True friendship: This is specially seen in the way they have patience with the silly conceited Toad and keep rescuing him and save him from himself. As William Horwood writes in the preface: “Kindness is at the very heart of “The Wind in the Willows”, the kindness that makes one character put the interests and needs of another first. For these are not characters out to gain advantage over each other.”3. Sweet Home (Dulce Domum): The scene where Mole feel homesickness and they decide to find his place and he invites Ratty in to his humble dwellings is priceless. Even the caroling field mice have a feast there. It reminds me of this essential breathing space - a home where meals unite family and friends - an almost holy place where we find renewed energy. 4. Transcendence: How to interprete the chapter “The Piper at the Gates of Dawn”? The mysterious Friend, nature god Pan, this awe and reverence in the presence of something transcendent - the feeling of both joy and sadness. It’s just a miracle. 5. Poetic nature: Grahames poetic descriptions of nature is remarkable. You just feel a desire to experience it all in its fullness. The wind, the grass, the sun, the snow, the river bank.
  • (4/5)
    this work took some getting used to... Once I "learned the rules," I found myself enjoying the lyrical prose. This is certainly a well written series of stories, but they are a little strange.
  • (5/5)
    I just finished reading this story to my five year-old daughter. She loved it! I sometimes needed to substitute more familiar vocabulary for less to create a smoother read aloud experience. For a slightly older child I wouldn't think this would be necessary. If you have only seen the Disney version, you are missing out. The characters are very genuine and lovable. The adventures they have are exciting without being terrifying, funny without being too silly, and the story is long enough for the reader (or read-to) to connect with the animals.I wasn't sure if the pace would be too slow for a young child, but it was not. The book could be divided into three acts: The River, The Woods, and Mr. Toad. Each story arc was exciting enough in it's own way to keep attention. The addition of so many wonderful full-color illustrations by Inga Moore only helped to hold interest. My daughter was truly sad to finish the final chapter. She now plays "Wind in the Willows" with her stuffed friends so that even though we have finished the book - the story continues.
  • (4/5)
    I'm sure I've read this book as a child, but thanks to my faulty memory, I couldn't say for sure. What's certain is I didn't expect I'd be as surprised by this old classic as I was. I was expecting a quiet pastoral affair with plenty of cute little animals cavorting about, and was almost shocked when the story deviated from the script, which up till a certain point included pleasant trips boating up and down a river and visits between friends Mole, River Rat, Toad, Badger and Otter, and what could have been a scary trip into the woods, had I been a young child. But then, WHAM! Toad getting arrested and sent to jail and the great escape that ensues complete with train chase, all this involving a whole slew of human beings who don't seem to find it the least bit strange that a toad should have stolen a car and driven recklessly, or been mistaken for a washerwoman once having donned the clothing of one such person, well... I never thought this innocent book would shake me up as much as it did. Blame it on the fact that I was sleepy and expecting a variation on Beatrix Potter maybe? But now I think of it, is Beatrix Potter anything like what I think I remember? I'm almost scared to find out!
  • (5/5)
    I've known the story of The Wind In The Willows forever, one of those things that seeps in in the time before memory begins, but on the other hand I have no memory of ever having read the book.And it is wonderful.Warm and clever and lovely, and touched by some sort of magic.It's all the little things like Mole feeling so much more at home in Badger's sett, because he's an underground animal at heart, but loving the river enough to forego that. And Ratty being lovely, and kind and ... Ratty is my favourite. And, it must be said, has been since I was wee.Completely and utterly worth reading, no matter how old you are.
  • (5/5)
    As the introduction (written back in the 80s by Grahame biographer Peter Green) rightly identifies, although Mr. Toad made The Wind in the Willows famous, his action packed adventures are the least evocative and I’d go further to say he’s the least interesting of the characters. The best chapter, Dulce Domum, in which Mole desperately seeks to return to his own home despite its humbleness is an intoxicatingly emotional description of the inescapable connection most of us have to our own familiar four walls however else we might imagine they seem to others (and nearly had me in tears by the time the carol singers arrived). The loyalty between Ratty and Mole is also especially touching, not unlike that between Sherlock and Watson, the former often riding roughshod of the latter’s feelings until he realises he’s gone too far, guilt sets in and he shambles about making amends.
  • (3/5)
    The Wind in the Willows is an odd book in that it is meant for children yet has chapter titles such as "Dulce Domum", "Like Summer Tempests Came His Tears", "The Return of Ulysses" and most famously "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn". Some of these chapters are stand alone with only a few threads of plot to interconnect them. In fact there is very little plot as the book is about friendship and maintaining the status quo. It's a very conservative book. I read it last forty years ago and can remember as a child being confused but somehow affected by The Piper at the Gates of Dawn chapter. Reading it as an adult, it is clearly the best part of the book. Still dislike Toad though.
  • (5/5)
    I suppose I was in the mood for this book, but it was a sheer delight and it immediately became a favorite book. My copy has an introduction and afterword, as well as a brief author bio written by Jane Yolen which I really appreciated. We only have a small cast of central characters here, a mole, a water rat, a badger and a toad, 'Mr. Toad'. I adore Mole and Ratty. I found myself loving every one of them, maybe even Mr. Toad. This is a children's book for grown-ups as well as mid aged kids. When I got to chapter 7, titled "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" my mouth dropped open. My copy only has a few illustrations in it - lovely black and white drawings, and the artist is not credited, although I think I deciphered the name Zimic. Then I decided that artist Tricia Zimic created the delightful cover illustration as well as the interior pen and ink drawings.I much more partial to the early half of the book, the rather nostalgic, pastoral adventures of Mole, Rat and Badger as well as the Piper piece in the middle. As Jane Yolen notes, this is really three sorts of stories in one book.
  • (1/5)

    Five out of ten.

    Finding the secret of the wind is hard enough without Mole wandering off into the Wild Wood and getting caught in a snowstorm or Toad stealing motorcars and landing in jail. Between practical Water Rat and wise old Badger, the four of them manage, after many great adventures and much laughter, to settle down to a quiet roar with an understanding of the wind's song and the Wild Wood.

  • (4/5)
    This was read out loud over the course of a month, so quite a bit different than my usual reading experiences. Even with the protracted reading, there was no difficulty following the thread of this classic's storyline. The chapters typically serve as mini-stories (much like Winnie the Pooh).As for the actual work, I think my review needs to be different than my usual too. I can't think of any other way to describe it except by comparing it to food. More contemporary books to me seem like there's a build-up chapter after chapter, much like a meal with multiple courses. Wind in the Willows is more like a really good stew. It starts off delicious and by the end of the book, there's still that flavor and richness that you enjoyed from the start.It's been a long time since I've encountered many of the words I found in this book and it was nice to exercise my vocabulary a little bit.
  • (4/5)
    This book is classics.A various character like the Mole, the Water Rat, the toad, and badger. When The Toad get interested in the motor car, various things happens... There were many animal characters, but I irritated Toad sometime for his boast.The end of story, his character problem is solved, so I felt relieved.
  • (5/5)
     Unfortunately, I never got the opportunity to read this classic work as an older child, but I do see it as more an older piece of children's literature that needs to be preserved and kept open for youth (even if it is dry or hard for them to understand the humor).I absolutely loved reading this book. It was so good I got goosebumps when it ended. I plan on reading the spin-off series and seeing what sort of links and take offs there are. My favorite character in this book was Rat, because he was responsible and doing the right thing in the benefit of Mole. I saw him really always genuine when he was thinking about Toad and his friends. He put everyone else first and himself last. In my opinion, it was Rat's doing that made this that made this book wrapped in a timeless and unconditional friendship... not only cute and hilarious, but rightly achieved.