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Schomburg: The Man Who Built a Library

Schomburg: The Man Who Built a Library

Escrito por Carole Boston Weatherford

Narrado por Ron Butler


Schomburg: The Man Who Built a Library

Escrito por Carole Boston Weatherford

Narrado por Ron Butler

valoraciones:
5/5 (8 valoraciones)
Longitud:
46 minutos
Publicado:
Dec 12, 2017
ISBN:
9781520087290
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Amid the scholars, poets, authors, and artists of the Harlem Renaissance stood an Afro-Puerto Rican named Arturo Schomburg. This law clerk's life's passion was to collect books, letters, music, and art from Africa and the African diaspora and to bring to light the achievements of people of African descent throughout the ages. When Schomburg's collection became so big that it began to overflow his house (and his wife threatened to mutiny), he turned to the New York Public Library, where he created and curated a collection that was the cornerstone of a new Negro Division. A century later, his groundbreaking collection, known as the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, has become a beacon to scholars all over the world.

Publicado:
Dec 12, 2017
ISBN:
9781520087290
Formato:
Audiolibro

Sobre el autor

Carole Boston Weatherford is the author of numerous award-winning books including and BOX: Henry Brown Mails Himself to Freedom, illustrated by Michele Wood which received a Newbery Honor; R-E-S-P-E-C-T: Aretha Franklin, the Queen of Soul, illustrated by Frank Morrison which won the 2021 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Book Award. When she's not traveling or visiting museums, Carole is mining the past for family stories, fading traditions, and forgotten struggles. She lives in North Carolina.


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4.8
8 valoraciones / 2 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    Briefly tells the story of Arthur Schomburg (1874-1934), who believed strongly that Africans had an important history, and that knowing of the accomplishments of past Blacks would give the younger generation pride.While I was very interested in reading this, as I had heard nothing about Schomburg, or about the Harlem Renaissance, I have a hard time imaging what age group this was written for. The book is oversize, like many picture books, and does have many full or 1/2 page illustrations. Yet the language is much more complex than one would use for pre-schoolers. It could work if the person reading it aloud just paraphrased the words, using the text as a guideline. The language would be appropriate for middle-school, if they were interested enough to learn new vocabulary, but I'm not sure if the "picture book" appearance would be too embarrassing for them to be seen looking at.Written with phrasing that at times seems contrived or the type of backward phrasing poems might use to fit words to a desired rhyme or meter.Contains a chronology, bibliography, and source notes. Points librarians to a resource (NYPL Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture) for patrons inquiring about Black History.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed learning about Arthur Schomburg very much. As the daughter of a historian, I take history incredibly seriously and applaud Schomburg's efforts to reclaim African history from the racist attempt to bury it in oblivion. Obviously it's important for black children to have a history to look back on, but as a white person I can't stress the importance of white people acknowledging black and African history. I was amazed to learn while *reading this book* that Audoban's mother was Creole. I had no idea! Which is appalling. I didn't know about Dumas until a few years ago. Whitewashed history is fake history and we all deserve better. Arthur Schomburg dedicated his life to that mission and I applaud him. I received a free electronic ARC of this book via Netgalley from the publisher in exchange for my honest opinion.