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The Woman in the Water

The Woman in the Water

Escrito por Charles Finch

Narrado por James Langton


The Woman in the Water

Escrito por Charles Finch

Narrado por James Langton

valoraciones:
4/5 (26 valoraciones)
Longitud:
8 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Feb 20, 2018
ISBN:
9781541485228
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

London, 1850: A young Charles Lenox struggles to make a name for himself as a detective . . . without a single case. Scotland Yard refuses to take him seriously and his friends deride him for attempting a profession at all. But when an anonymous writer sends a letter to the paper claiming to have committed the perfect crime—and promising to kill again—Lenox is convinced that this is his chance to prove himself.

The writer's first victim is a young woman whose body is found in a naval trunk, caught up in the rushes of a small islets in the middle of the Thames. With few clues to go on, Lenox endeavors to solve the crime before another innocent life is lost. When the killer's sights are turned toward those whom Lenox holds most dear, the stakes are raised and Lenox is trapped in a desperate game of cat and mouse.

In the tradition of Sherlock Holmes, this newest mystery in the Charles Lenox series pits the young detective against a maniacal murderer who would give Professor Moriarty a run for his money.

Editorial:
Publicado:
Feb 20, 2018
ISBN:
9781541485228
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor

Charles Finch is the USA Today bestselling author of the Charles Lenox mysteries, including The Vanishing Man. His first contemporary novel, The Last Enchantments, is also available from St. Martin's Press. Finch received the 2017 Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing from the National Book Critics Circle. His essays and criticism have appeared in the New York Times, Slate, Washington Post, and elsewhere. He lives in Los Angeles.


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4.2
26 valoraciones / 20 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    I have read the other eleven books written by Charles Finch and enjoy the Charles Lenox series. This book, the first of a planned prelude trilogy, is an entertaining addition to that series. It is interesting to see how the author of a successful series proceeds after allowing his main character to age chronologically. In this instance, the author manages both the writing style and backstory to allow the book to fit in seamlessly. The series does not need to be read in order.
  • (4/5)
    This book kind of reminding me of Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes series with similar timeframe setting. Interestigng.
  • (3/5)
    The story was interesting but not compelling. Parts were enjoyable and others seemed rather plodding. It didn't seem to hold my attention as had others in this series.
  • (5/5)
    It was fun to see the early days of the later successful Charles and Graham. The first case involves 2 perfect murders with the promise of one more in exactly one month. I see some elements of The Last Enchantments in Charles's youthful self-doubting, but the story carries well and maintains the tone of the other books. My favorite Easter egg was the brief appearance by young John Dallington.
  • (4/5)
    My introduction to Lenox. It must have been quite good as I rated it 4 at the time, but I can't remember anything much - except that the title really should have been "WomEn in the Water".
  • (3/5)
    It was an interesting premise about two women found dead in the Thames. One woman was in a traveling trunk and the other was strapped to a door. Who are they and why has no one reported the missing? Charles Lennox and Graham, his valet and friend, insert themselves into the police investigation because secretly they both want to be detectives. While searching for clues to identity of the women and the killer, Charles learns that his father is dying and that his childhood sweetheart has married.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoy this series very much, the characters as well as the writing.This is the prequel to the Charles Lenox mysteries and begins with Charles grudgingly being hired by Scotland Yard for a nominal amount a week. 3 of the 4 detectives with whom he works do not like Charles, but it might be due to their egos, laziness, & sloppy work.A woman's body is found in a trunk on Walnut Island (in the Thames), a letter is printed by a local paper from the murderer boasting about his "perfect crime".... that it is so perfect that he will in fact commit a second. Then a second woman is found on the banks of the Thames, laying upon a door, heavily covered in flowers, in a white dress, heavy white makeup, & odd shoes. Charles notices that although her dress is wet, the door is not...There are any number of clues, many of which are Red Herrings which lead to confusion & dead ends, and the lack of forensic identification also hinders the investigation.Charles father, who is ill, is introduced in this book as is Thomas McConnell, the doctor with whom Charles relies on in later investigations, and John Dallington a future partner.I took one star off for the way the conclusion & its circumstances were handled. Otherwise I was very satisfied with the book.
  • (5/5)
    Just loved this. Look forward to his new book every year, and his idea to do a prequel was a good one. After 11 books now, the Lenox universe is getting pretty populated, so it is ok to take time off from some characters and be able to go back to them in a subsequent book. But, really, the best thing about these books is the relationships characters have with Lenox. The mysteries are good mind you, plotted well, speed along, etc, but Lenox's trip with his dad or moments with his mom and brother make the book, IMHO.
  • (4/5)
    A historical mystery series, set during the Victorian age, that I have read from the first. This though is a prequel, and we meet a young Lennox, when he is only 23, starting out in his crime solving career. When a letter to the newspapers, boasting about committing the perfect crime, comes to the attention of Lennox, he sets off, with his trusty valet, sidekick, to solve the murder. It will soon be two bodies of women found, each staged in unusual ways.When reading about the solving of crimes in the past, I am reminded of how difficult it was for those who job this was. Much more traveling, chasing down clues, chasing down witnesses, so time consuming. Took more talent though to piece together all the information, and then decide the who, how and why. In this outing, we get to see a young man of privileged background, fighting for a chance to do what interested him. There is also a personal, rather sad revelation. We also find out how he first met McConnell, who would become a good friend and prove integral to many of the stories that come after.Well written, tightly plotted, this should bring new readers to this worthy series, or at least I hope so.ARC from Netgalley.
  • (4/5)
    I read the Beautiful Blue Death which was the first in this series so when I saw this Prequel offered on NetGalley and asked for it and was fortunate enough to receive it for review. This book chronicles the first case of Charles Lenox and also highlights his personal misgivings about going against his family wishes and starting his career as a private investigator. What I found fascinating was how Charles and his valet would peruse the daily newspapers to find a crime that they would decide needed investigating and then present themselves for that task. The book was well-written with clues planted strategically for the reader but not making it easy to solve.The characters were believable and the setting attention grabbing.
  • (4/5)
    Charles Lenox mysteries by Charles Finch, are books I savour. I take my time reading them and allow myself to be immersed in the story.This is a book later in the series, but it takes you back to the time when Lenox is just starting out.1850, London and Lenox has completed his education and set up home in a flat in St. James's Square. Lenox has chosen to become a private detective. This is something that really doesn't exist at this time.Lenox reads the papers daily and clips out articles about various crimes, compiling a reference collection. His eye is caught by a letter to the editor, from an anonymous writer, laying claim to having committed the perfect crime with the promise to kill again. Lenox is determined to catch the killer and prove he is serious about his career choice.Lenox is intent, persistent and observant to detail. Even though Scotland Yard doesn't take him seriously, he uses his connections to get access to restricted areas and information. Bit by bit he pieces things together.This book also give background to some of the main characters found in previous books, providing a more rounded story.I am looking forward to reading more in this series.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful. If you are a fan, an avid reader of this Charles Finch series, you will thoroughly enjoy this prequel. Be prepared, it is Impossible to put down.
  • (4/5)
    In which I'm introduced to a Victorian gentleman detective!London, 1850. Charles Lenox is obviously intelligent. At first I thought he was a tad awkward socially. Later I realized it's just his way, after all he's only 23 and just beginning his life as a detective. Apparently Charles has let the girl he loved slip away due to his own inaction, not recognizing that what he felt for Elizabeth (who is later called Jane) was more than a childhood friendship. Between establishing himself in the detecting arena and losing his love before it could become a reality, Charles doesn't seem to be as yet comfortable in his own skinCharles' companion and valet Graham, is a partner in this cohort of investigation. We are told that Graham has a mind that absorbs and holds onto information. I love the scene of them both cutting out newspaper articles and then comparing notes to discover where things might be amiss, where their skills might be needed.Charles has a hard time being taken seriously by Scotland Yard, even when he discovers things they miss, such as this latest case which seems to link to another murder. A body has been found in a naval locker. Another body has been floated Ophelia like down the Thames to come to rest on mud flats. Charles feels they're connected. The police are more than sceptical, if not downright disdainful.We are introduced to Charles' family who are incredibly likeable. I feel that Charles just can't help being as he is, given these special people who care so deeply for him.I was hesitant with this Sherlock and Holmes type pairing, even though these two are very different from that famous duo--although there's a lingering familiar air.All in all, an immensely enjoyable read!A Minotaur Books ARC via NetGalley
  • (5/5)
    In this prequel to the series, a young Charles Lenox is searching for a killer. He is also looking for his station in life. It is enlightening to see him struggle with his own emotions as he deals with a love he cannot have as well as the eminent death of his father. He is drawn to detective work, but alas, that profession is beneath his social standing. Still, he, along with his friend and valet Graham, have a real knack for seeing things others don’t and deciphering the clues. This tale is filled with twists and, as in real life, some false information that must be winnowed out. And Charles and Graham are up to the task. And while the mystery is intriguing, much of the enjoyment of the story comes from the personal interaction of the characters.
  • (4/5)
    Readers of the Charles Lenox historical mysteries are comfortable with their middle-aged hero. In this prequel, we meet 23-year-old Charles, newly out of university and struggling with the question “what shall I do with my life?” As the second son of an aristocratic British family, his choices are religion, politics or the military. He wants to be a detective. But, of course, he can’t take money … can’t actually work for pay (heaven forbid!)Graham, Charles’s valet/butler/Watson/aide-de-camp, is also present. As in the main series, they’re fast friends, not at all in a master-servant relationship. Their daily routine includes reading several London newspapers (they have two subscriptions of each) and clipping crime news. They both pick up on a letter published in one of the dodgier newspapers – a man boasting of a murder and revealing that he will kill again. Soon, Lenox and Graham have attached themselves to the local police inspectors in trying to solve two murders … one victim found in a steamer trunk, the other laid out Ophelia-like along the bank of the Thames. The men’s first task is to figure out who the victims are. Both are deemed to be respectable woman – and yet neither has been reported missing. The Woman in the Water is a wonderful story, very revealing about our hero’s back story and that of secondary characters we’ve grown to know and love. While I was reading it I thought, “What if Charles Finch were to write a time-travel novel featuring Charles Lenox – in which he travels forward to present-day and sees all the tools today’s detectives?” Certainly, a little burring of the lines between genres could prove a stunning read. And who better than Charles Finch to accomplish it?
  • (4/5)
    What a lovely introduction to the writing of author Charles Finch and his lead character, young aspiring detective Charles Lenox. Finch writes prose exquisitely with an eye to every detail. It was a pleasure reading his scenic descriptions as much as delving into the details of the murder mysteries. The banter among characters is absolutely delightful and it eases the tension of the grizzly parts of the story.This book is a prequel written after the twelfth book in the Charles Lenox Mysteries series. It happened to be my first foray into this series and seemed like a good place to start - to get grounded in the basis of the series. After reading this book, I am even more eager to dig into the other twelve (if only my TBR wasn't already 200 books deep...sigh.) If finely written historical mystery is your passion, then this is the book for you!Synopsis (from publishers website):This chilling new mystery in the USA Today bestselling series by Charles Finch takes readers back to Charles Lenox’s very first case and the ruthless serial killer who would set him on the course to become one of London’s most brilliant detectives.London, 1850: A young Charles Lenox struggles to make a name for himself as a detective…without a single case. Scotland Yard refuses to take him seriously and his friends deride him for attempting a profession at all. But when an anonymous writer sends a letter to the paper claiming to have committed the perfect crime—and promising to kill again—Lenox is convinced that this is his chance to prove himself.The writer’s first victim is a young woman whose body is found in a naval trunk, caught up in the rushes of a small islets in the middle of the Thames. With few clues to go on, Lenox endeavors to solve the crime before another innocent life is lost. When the killer’s sights are turned toward those whom Lenox holds most dear, the stakes are raised and Lenox is trapped in a desperate game of cat and mouse.In the tradition of Sherlock Holmes, this newest mystery in the Charles Lenox series pits the young detective against a maniacal murderer who would give Professor Moriarty a run for his money.
  • (4/5)

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

    Well, I did it again. I started a book that has been a series. What I did NOT realize is that this is a "prequel" to the Charles Lenox series. In this book we get to see the back story as he talks about his first case.

    I recommend this book and I will be looking for the rest of the series to read.

    My thanks to netgalley and Minotaur Books for this advanced readers copy.

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

  • (3/5)
    I won a copy of this book from Goodreads and it couldn’t have come at a better time. Even though I don’t read a lot of mysteries, I do enjoy them once in a while. However, this month I’ve really been into them.The Woman in the Water was my first Charles Finch novel but it wont be my last. I thoroughly enjoyed the characters and the story. This was a solid 4 star read for most of the book. There was just something about the reveal near the end the for some reason didn’t do it for me. Other than that one part, I really liked this book.I’m not sure when, but I will definitely be picking up more Charles Lenox Mysteries.
  • (4/5)
    I received a free e-copy of this book and have chosen to write an honest and unbiased review. I have no personal affiliation with the author. ‘The Woman In the Water’ is my first Charles Lenox mystery. This is a well-written murder mystery set in 1850’s London. It is a prequel in which the author backgrounds Charles Lenox and other characters that may appear in future books in this series. The author paints us a very descriptive picture of what life was like in 1850’s London. We learn how Lenox’s career began as a private detective as he takes on his first case along with Scotland Yard. There are plenty of twists and turns and a surprise ending. This book is well worth the read and I look forward to reading more books in the Charles Lenox series in the future.
  • (5/5)
    Title...The Woman In The WaterAuthor...Charles FinchMy " in a nutshell" summary...This is a prequel to this series. It is the story of just how Charles began his career as a private investigator. He is young...only 23...and living on his own for the first time. He wants to travel and he wants to solve crimes. He is dealing with losing the love of his life, his father’s illness and a diligent housekeeper intent on making him crazed...oh...and cats! He is not a cat lover. He has Graham...his valet/butler. Graham seems to know what Charles needs even before Charles does. The murderer in this case is clever...very clever...but Charles is very clever, too! My thoughts after reading this book...All I have to say is that I loved this book. But...this is a series that I have always readand loved. Although I am not a fan of prequels...this one made sense to me and just felt like the first book in the series. What I loved about this book...I loved the era, the writing and the suspense. What I did not love about this book...I wished that Elizabeth had married Charles. Final thoughts...This was a lovely reading experience. This book was a page turner in its own gentle way.Would this be a good choice for you...potential reader?If you love this kind of English mystery...set in the 1850’s...this is a book as well as a series that you will love.I received an advance reader’s copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley and Amazon. It was my choice to read it and review it.