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Her Body and Other Parties: Stories

Her Body and Other Parties: Stories

Escrito por Carmen Maria Machado

Narrado por Amy Landon


Her Body and Other Parties: Stories

Escrito por Carmen Maria Machado

Narrado por Amy Landon

valoraciones:
4/5 (111 valoraciones)
Longitud:
8 horas
Publicado:
Oct 3, 2017
ISBN:
9781681686899
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Nota del editor

Wonderfully weird…

Machado’s collection of stories is so wonderfully weird. Genre-bending, uncanny, and often very funny, each of these unusual stories has something poignant to say about being a person and about being an artist.

Descripción

In Her Body and Other Parties, Carmen Maria Machado blithely demolishes the arbitrary borders between psychological realism and science fiction, comedy and horror, fantasy and fabulism. While her work has earned her comparisons to Karen Russell and Kelly Link, she has a voice that is all her own. In this electric and provocative debut, Machado bends genre to shape startling narratives that map the realities of women's lives and the violence visited upon their bodies.

A wife refuses her husband's entreaties to remove the green ribbon from around her neck. A woman recounts her sexual encounters as a plague slowly consumes humanity. A salesclerk in a mall makes a horrifying discovery within the seams of the store's prom dresses. One woman's surgery-induced weight loss results in an unwanted houseguest. And in the bravura novella "Especially Heinous," Machado reimagines every episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, a show we naïvely assumed had shown it all, generating a phantasmagoric police procedural full of doppelgängers, ghosts, and girls with bells for eyes.
Publicado:
Oct 3, 2017
ISBN:
9781681686899
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro

Sobre el autor

Carmen Maria Machado estudió en el prestigioso Writers’ Workshop de la Universidad de Iowa. Es autora de cuentos y textos ensayísticos y críticos que han aparecido en publicaciones como The New Yorker, Granta, Guernica, Electric Literature, The Paris Review, AGNI, NPR, Gulf Coast, Los Angeles Review of Books y VICE. En Anagrama ha publicado Su cuerpo y otras fiestas, finalista del National Book Award y del International Dylan Thomas Prize.


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3.9
111 valoraciones / 36 Reseñas
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Reseñas de críticos

  • Machado's debut is so wonderfully weird. Genre-bending, uncanny, and often very funny, each of these unusual stories has something poignant to say about being a person, and about being an artist.

    Scribd Editors
  • This genre-bending debut is by turns horrifying and hilarious, yet perpetually exhilarating. Fantasy, sci-fi, mythology, horror, and even a reimagining of "Law & Order: SVU" blend in this critically acclaimed collection. (Seriously, check out how many publications gave this a starred review.)

    Scribd Editors

Reseñas de lectores

  • (1/5)
    Good start but then it got weird and not my cup of tea
  • (5/5)
    SOo good. This story collection starts strong with an eerie, modern telling of the Girl with the Green Ribbon story, and every story that follows is bizarre, spooky, strange, and wonderfully written. Most of the stories are very sex-centric, and it says a lot about the quality of the writing that as an asexual reader I was still pulled in and super engaged. My only beef with the book was that the longest story, "Especially Heinous", was the hardest for me to get into and engage with, and I was a bit sad that it took up such a large portion of the book, since I wanted more short stories like all the others in the book! But that's a personal beef. This book is excellent and you should go read it right now.
  • (4/5)
    This was Santathing selection from two years ago - and I finally got around to reading it.These types of books are always an odd one for me. I'm too literal to enjoy some of the stories. I appreciate what the author is doing, and I find the writing to be excellent, but stories that are metaphors for something else and never resolve to a concrete explanation always leave me a bit hanging.On the other hand, there are stories I really enjoyed - specifically "Especially Heinous". I loved everything about it - the oddness of the setting, the ghost girls with Bells in their eyes, the doppelgangers. Its a really wonderful story.So this is a volume I will be keeping and I hope to be giving it a second read. It really deserves the praise it has received.
  • (4/5)
    Terrific collection with real bite. The long story reframing 12 seasons of Law & Order: SVU was actually the least successful for me, but many of the other shorts were impressive, uncomfortable and intriguing. I know it's tough for publishers to market short story collections, but I never mind a new collection from a fresh voice.
  • (3/5)
    An interest collection fused with originality, sensuality, and emotion turmoil. Machado focuses on the intimate details of experience and fuses this into a coherent and truthful, without holding back, set of short stories.

    3 stars.
  • (5/5)
    Every now and then a writer comes along who not only takes masterful command of her medium but has the courage and artistry to penetrate the veil between the superficial world and the realm of the soul. Every once in a miraculous while the publishing world actually gives this writer to readers. In these stories, with authorative clarity, Machado pays homage to gothic horror, modern crime TV, the eerie legacy of the Brownies, the American family dream, and more, all the while also tearing all of it apart and basically showing us our own glistening entrails. Yet that makes the book sound awfully heavy--it is indeed thick with complexities and disturbance, but delicious to read, full of humor, eroticism, and ewwww-gross delights.
  • (5/5)
    ‘’What magical thing could you want so badly they take you away from the known world for wanting it?’’This book is one of those cases when you feel someone calling your name. From the enticing cover to the cryptic tale. Naturally, this being a short story collection falling into Literary Fiction, Magical Realism and Gender Studies, finding itself in my hands was unavoidable. This proved to be a very special, extreme adventure.Machado writes with bravery, clarity and confidence, centering her stories on sexuality and beauty from the perspective of women who do not follow the flow or adjust to society’s demands and conformities. In frank, open, haunting writing, she stresses how the body becomes a projection of the way women have been viewed- and are still viewed- in our societies. Beauty, sexuality, everything is preconceived, even in our modern, sophisticated world. More so now, I believe. Many support- either consciously or not- that you must change when you are different or you will find yourself ostracised. This notion was obviously much more common in the past. In my opinion, today we have a different kind of isolation. The psychological imprisonment, the bullying, the feeling that you simply aren’t good enough. We let others decide and throw parties on our bodies and our souls. Why? Because we need acceptance. What if we don’t find fit the image of beauty and grace others have already cultivated for us?The Husband Stitch: A woman, born with a green ribbon on her neck, finds love and creates a beautiful family. Or does she? A dark tale that becomes darker with references to urban legends and tragic folk myths. Absolutely brilliant.Inventory: A woman remembers past lovers as a deathly virus is slowly destroying the country. Mothers: A very complex story, centered around a horribly dysfunctional relationship, where reality blends with the memories of a shattered mind. This is one of the most powerful moments in the collection.‘’Stabler never told Benson about his little brother. But he also never told her about his older brother, which was understandable, because he didn’t know about him, either’’ (If this isn’t perfect sarcasm, I don’t know what is…)Especially Heinous: Machado imagines plot lines for episodes of the TV series Law and Order: SVU or whatever its name is. Frankly, they are so much better than the actual episodes of the actual series. The only problem is I found this to be completely irrelevant to the overall tone of the collection but it was hugely entertaining.Real Women Have Bodies: Women become mist. Suddenly and without any comprehensible cause. They turn invisible while clothes become alive. This is a story of the complex relationship between us and our bodies which become even more perplexing as we grow up. Body positivity, anorexia, the notion adopted by many men that our bodies are theirs to use as they see fit since the beginning of time. Who and what decides how a ‘’real’’ woman should look like? This is such a beautiful, tragic tale with a beautiful relationship at its heart and haunting descriptions of the misty women.‘’Foxes wove through the streets at night. There was a white one among them, sleek and fast, and she looked like the ghost of the others.’’Eight Bites: One of the most profound stories in the collection. Young women have to undergo surgeries to remain thin. Eight bites. That’s what they can eat. Eight bites to keep the perfect body intact.‘’Do you ever worry’’, she asked me, ‘’that you’re the madwoman in the attic?’’The Resident: This is the most perplexing story in the collection. It gave me quite a lot of trouble in trying to classify it so to speak. A woman finds herself in an old-fashioned hotel, occupied by bohemian artists that are not what they seem. Is it a horror story? An allegory? Probably a combination of the two. It is certainly haunting, sensual and atmospheric but I didn’t find it particularly interesting. If anything, it seemed a bit pretentious.Difficult at Parties: A story of trauma, abuse and obsession that crosses the lines. I found parts of this tale distasteful and, for me, this was the dud of the collection.Despite the (very) few issues, this is a raw, haunting, brave collection. I recommend it without any hesitation but I don’t think it is for everyone. If you are uncomfortable with certain dark thematic elements, there’s a chance you may not enjoy it. However, I know that most of us are brave readers, attracted to dark and controversial themes and to books that make us think….‘’There are strange evenings when the sun sets but it rains anyway, and the sky is gold and peach and also gray and purple like a bruise. Every morning, a fine mist coats the grove. Some nights, a bloody harvest moon rises over the horizon and stains the clouds like an alien sunrise.’’
  • (5/5)
    Her Body and Other Parties is a short story collection focused on the horrors of being a woman. I can say quite frankly that it left me disturbed and, as a man, ladies, I am forever in your debt

    A wonderful and creepy read filled with great prose.
  • (5/5)
    In Her Body and Other Parties, Carmen Maria Machado has turned the oppressions that women face in our society into literal horrors. Each story in this collection is surprising, provocative, often darkly funny, and different from the one that came before. And at eight stories, this collection is the perfect length. I started off listening to the audiobook, but halfway through the third story, I bought a paper copy because I knew I would want to read these stories again and again. The strongest story is the opener, "The Husband Stitch," which uses urban legends to illustrate how men try to entirely possess women, allowing them nothing that is theirs alone. And the final story, "Difficult at Parties," moved me to tears. This book will definitely find a place in my favorite reads of the year, I'm sure.
  • (5/5)
    This collection of short stories contains some of the most disturbing, haunting, and gorgeous writing I've ever read. My dog ate my copy but I will be buying another one. Wow. Setting the bar incredibly high for a debut novel. Dizzying, feverish and obsessive, what an insane ride.
  • (4/5)
    This collection is so dark and subversive and unsettling and AMAZING. I will definitely read the entire book again, and still may not feel like I quite grasp everything the author wants to convey. Standouts for me include Inventory; The Husband Stitch; Eight Bites.....but there is not a single story I don't want to experience again. Completely absorbing. Very recommended.
  • (5/5)
    LITERALLY THE BEST SHORT STORY COLLECTION I'VE READ
  • (5/5)
    An utterly astounding collection of stories - "The Resident" in particular, about a writer on an artist's retreat across the lake from her childhood Girl Scout camp, is going to stick with me for a while.
  • (4/5)
    I am an impatient reviewer. I like to move on quickly to the next book while slowlyly mulling over the last. To stop and write feels like an interruption of this process. However, I was surprised by how many reviewers of disliked "Especially Heinous", I felt it necessary to give it the voice I felt it deserved. Along with, "The Husband Stitch", I felt it was the best story in Machado's novel. There was so much depth and meaning and it was told in the most creative voice. It was filled with insightful depth and symbolism that was so interesting, I reread this story three times.
  • (4/5)
    Carmen Maria Machado's book of short stories is an extraordinary collection that references fairy tales with a dark and woman-centered slant that brings to mind both Angela Carter and Kelly Link. From the opening story The Husband Stitch, a dark take on a familiar fairy tale, to a weird and haunting summary of 272 episodes of Law & Order: SVU, to Inventory, a remembering of past sexual relationships against the background of a world ravaged by a pandemic, each story was so different than the one before, although they all shared a stark vision of a world not entirely friendly.
  • (4/5)
    I thought this was a great debut collection. There's a freshness to it, along with an ancientness. Machado weaves stories in a way that echoes the style of various of my favourite male writers, but with the added timbre of female experience of the world.The stories in the collection examine the female body, as a symbol of a woman's autonomy and as a symbol of the violence that seeks to remove that autonomy. The stories range from gothic horror to futuristic dystopia, and some don't fit gladly into any genre. Some have appeared in literary magazines, others are published here for the first time.
  • (4/5)
    I'm a wary reader of short stories (but I'm an equal-opportunity reader of novels ;)) and while my experience is limited, I think this collection of stories may be the best I've ever encountered. Some of these stories are fantastical, others dystopian and apocalyptic, but they are all have a grounding in the world we live in today.
  • (1/5)
    Attempted as part of the Indiespensable series. I couldn't finish this book. I have read all of the previous picks back into the 40s but this thwarted my efforts. I don't really like short stories, and these didn't work for me - I gave up in the middle of the Law & Order episodes. I just didn't see the point. No doubt that reflects more on me than the book, but it was unreadable, to me.
  • (3/5)
    Her Body and Other Parties wrinkled my brain. Seriously, more than once the story was over and my brain was spinning out of control in an attempt to fully grasp what I'd just read. Ambiguity with a capital A! But at its core is the (seemingly) never-ending battle between women and fear - of men, of children, of choice, of their own bodies, of love. I absolutely adored how Machado blurred the genre lines so thoroughly that they were almost erased, almost.My favorite stories are "The Husband Stitch" and "The Resident" - loved loved LOVED those two!I cannot wait to read more by this author; hoping for a full-length novel in the near future.3 stars"As a grown woman, I would have said to my father that there are true things in this world observed only by a single set of eyes." ("The Husband Stitch")"In contrast, colonist sounds monstrous, as if you have kicked down the door hatch of your mind and inside you find a strange family eating supper." ("The Resident")"What is worse: being locked outside of your own mind, or being locked inside of it?" ("The Resident")
  • (3/5)
    Thank you to LibraryThing's Early Reviewers program for the audio copy of this book. It definitely was different from anything else I have ever read or listened to.First, I have to mention the audiobook itself. Like another reviewer, I found very little delineation between the end of one story and the beginning of the next. More than once, I had to rewind to be sure the story was ended and the narrator had begun the next one. Amy Landon was excellent as narrator. I do wish she had been allowed a few seconds between stories.Now. The stories themselves. I'm not sure what to think of them. They were incredibly well written. Carmen Maria Machado's words painted stunning pictures of beauty and horror, daily life and the macabre. The writing was truly superb... it's the stories that I am not too sure about. They all (in one way or another) dealt with female sexuality. While I enjoyed the construction of the stories, I found my mind wandering at times. I am not a fan of explicit sex in books and there was much of that in this collection of stories. However, I believe that the stories would suffer were it left out, as sex and sexuality had a starring role.Not my thing but well done. Recommended for those who like their horror to be on the cutting edge.
  • (4/5)
    Short story collections are difficult to review because they can be so uneven; not perhaps in quality so much, as in the fact that some stories will resonate more with some readers than others. For me, the first two stories, "The Husband Stitch" and "Inventory" were 5 stars. Haunting, evocative stories that were akin to prose poems. These stories spoke to me directly by reproducing nameless feelings that were both familiar and discomforting.All of the stories could be categorized in the realm of speculative fiction: whether fairy tale, gothic, dystopia or fantasy. Most contained candid sexuality, but these scenes were neither erotic nor gratuitous. Some readers might be put off by them, but for me they were as an integral part of each story as they are in each woman's life. Although not my favorite of the stories (perhaps only because of the format) I feel like I will always be haunted by the girls-with-bells-for-eyes from the story "Especially Heinous."I agree with other reviewers that the beginnings of each story could have been better distinguished on the audiobook version. Also helpful would have been a table of contents on the cover that would provide the length of each story so that a listener could plan to listen to each one without interruption. Perhaps the publisher will heed these comments in future editions.
  • (5/5)
    A wide variety of creative and intriguing stories that kept me consistently engaged. One is about a ladies struggle to connect with others at an artists colony. Another reveals the author;s observations about each episode in a television series. The author (in real life) lives with her female husband but sexuality is not a major component of these short stories. If there is a theme I would see it as how a person must struggle for acceptance no matter what their situation in life and this theme is a universal and one that all readers should identify with. A very well written book.
  • (4/5)
    This review is for the HighBridge audio book version of this work, which I received as part of the LibraryThing Early Reader's program. I have never heard or read short stories like these before. I listened in my car, is as my custom, but often found myself so disquieted by what was happening, or going to happen, that I had to turn off the CD player. Ominous, fantastic, erotic, disturbing, and, occasionally, playful, these are, in a word, haunting stories. This collection is full of tormented women, but is the torment purely internal or are there external forces at work? That's left to our imagination.
  • (3/5)
    I'm not typically a reader of short story collections, although I have read a few here & there. This one was available as an audio on Hoopla and has been getting a lot of hype, so I was curious to see what the fuss was about. These are basically short stories about women -- many dealing with sexuality in a variety of ways. The stories are very diverse and often abstract. Lots of surreal, odd, and queer stuff going on. I will readily admit that I really didn't know what was going on in quite a few of these. I started out really enjoying the first couple of stories, but after that I struggled to stay focused and to understand what was happening. My overall feeling is that the majority of these just didn't overly appeal to me and I found the subject matter too weird & confusing. But despite that, I was still quite impressed with Machado's writing, which made me keep reading until the end.I do suspect that I may have enjoyed this more had I not read it on audio. The endings of each story were very abrupt, and there was virtually no audible gap between stories, making it quite difficult to discern when one story ended and the next began. I didn't dislike this collection, and as I said, I thought it was well written, but I think it might take a re-reading to fully appreciate it.
  • (1/5)
    I couldn’t get passed the SVU part. I found what I had listened to be dull and confusing and just couldn’t get into it.
  • (3/5)
    This book is absolutely immaculately written and full of wonderful and scintillating imagery. So why only three stars? Mostly because the stories aren’t especially narrative. Which is why I think so many people have issues finding when one story has ended and another has begun. I don’t think these are short stories, so much as flash fiction. If you don’t mind having no resolution, or maybe even a middle, then you can enjoy this a great deal. But if you want a more full bodies narrative, then you should skip this. But if you don’t mind just reading for the sake of enjoying pros and ideas then you should absolutely give this a shot.
  • (4/5)
    An uneven but intermittently superb collection of stories about female dislocation, in which America's obsessive anxiety about gender is refracted through a series of different formats, from fantasy to horror to experimental playfulness.The opening story, ‘The Husband Stitch’ (a version of which can be read online), is a kind of erotic and violent folktale which inevitably brings Angela Carter to mind, and which doesn't suffer from the comparison. I loved it, finding it creepy and sexy and meaningful in all the right ways, with the oppressive mood expertly broken up by flashes of wit – especially in the occasional stage directions Machado provides: ‘If you are reading this story out loud, move aside the curtain to illustrate this final point to your listeners. It'll be raining, I promise.’The rest of the collection didn't always live up to that. It's notable that the stories that work best are the most formally experimental, especially ‘Inventory’ – a zombie-apocalypse story presenting as a list of the narrator's past lovers – and, most notoriously, ‘Especially Heinous’, which takes the form of a TV listings guide to 272 episodes of Law & Order: SVU.Now, admittedly I am a sucker for a gimmick. I loved that PowerPoint chapter in A Visit from the Goon Squad, and I loved this even more. The episodes become dense little bursts of microfiction which can be surreal, funny, or unexpectedly moving:“ᴘʀᴏᴅɪɢʏ”: “Look at me, Dad!” Stabler's daughter says, laughing, twirling. As clearly as if he were watching a movie, he sees her in two years' time, swatting a boyfriend's hands away in a backseat, harder and harder. She screams. Stabler starts. She has fallen to the ground and is clutching her ankle, crying.Or again:“ʀᴇᴅᴇᴍᴘᴛɪᴏɴ”: Benson accidentally catches a rapist when she Google-stalks her newest OkCupid date. She can't decide whether or not to mark this in the “success” (“caught rapist”) or “failure” (“date didn't work out”) column. She marks it in both.Anyone who remembers Charlie Brooker's amazing (now sadly defunct) TVGoHome website will know the potential that can be coaxed out of this kind of format. But I don't want to give the wrong impression: the reason these experimental stories work better than the others is not because Machado's ideas can't stand up on their own or need distractions. It's more that the experimentation forces a certain wit and humour into the writing which otherwise is somewhat lacking – and without that, I felt a few niggles start to creep in.I suppose on some level I find the gender politics a bit dispiriting; there is a faint strand of political moralising which sits uneasily with how the whole book is founded on a presumed mysterious otherness of women, an otherness that is then associated with vulnerability and violence. I felt it sometimes walked a fine line between raising important issues about victimisation, and reinforcing them. (Many reviews, including mine, use the word ‘erotic’ to describe these stories, but actually a lot of the sex is described in that joyless, passive way that has become so de rigueur nowadays; ‘I got wet,’ Machado's characters will say, or ‘I see him, and I run slick’ – but that's it – arousal is reduced to pure physiology.) Another of those Law and Order pieces: “It's not that I hate men,” the woman says. “I'm just terrified of them. And I'm okay with that fear.” This is partly a joke about the interminable sexual violence in L&O:SVU, but in a way it points up a certain gendered acceptance of fear that runs through the whole book. I'm not sure what I think about it.Well whatever I think about it, I think it's fascinatingly expressed here, in these odd, slippery stories that for me were full of unexpected delights.
  • (5/5)
    And just like that, the book was done. 😭

    I haven't read a book of short stories (outside of assigned readings for school) in quite some time. I think the last one that I picked up to read was a Stephen King collection, but I could be wrong. This one, however, filled my Instagram and Twitter feed. I went back and forth about it because I wasn't "in the mood" for a collection of stories, but I'm glad I decided to dive in. I waited for WEEKS for a copy from the library and finally I received that wonderful message: "Your library hold has been automatically borrowed." :)

    Honestly, the deciding factor on this one was the reviews. I try not to make book decisions on reviews because, well, it is a personal opinion. Just because I like a book doesn't mean everyone will and likewise with disliking. However, Roxane Gay gave it 5 stars on Goodreads, and that had me thinking (& yes, her name is spelled right dammit).

    I flipped through the first story in what felt like 5 minutes and let me say this, I WILL NEVER LOOK AT A RIBBON THE SAME WAY AGAIN. This story will be a part of my brain forever. It was intriguing, scandalous, dark, titillating (hold the giggles), and then... BAM... the ending!

    Hold on... the ending of The Husband Stitch requires a GIF...

     (I think that was literally my face)

    I remember thinking to myself, "If all these stories end like this, I'm sold!"

    And, I wasn't disappointed. A lot of the stories had smack-you-in-the-face endings that came out of left field and I ate it up. It reminded me of the first time I read Shirley Jackson's The Lottery (which if you haven't read that, I highly suggest you get your hands on a copy).

    The only section I didn't love was the Law and Order one. It was interesting, but I often found myself drifting off into my own thoughts, compared to the other stories where I completely tuned the world out.

    I could see every detail of these women's stories and while sometimes I wanted more, I secretly liked the open-endings. I guess I'm a glutton for punishment that way.

    These stories were original, exotic, and visceral. I dived into these tales that left me questioning life, society, and even my personal desire to write. If I can produce something that causes half the amount of emotion and psychological evaluation as Machado's collection does, I'll consider myself worthy of publishing.

    Honestly, though, ignore the reviews. Take mine with a grain of salt even, because I've read through them myself and this is just one of those books that you have to either decide to jump in completely or walk away. There are those that loved every second and those that wanted more and were left disappointed. It really runs the spectrum like no other book I've read recently, but I'm glad I finally got my hands on a copy and read it and I would read it again. I think this is one of those books that timing is crucial in receiving it.

    Happy Reading!
  • (3/5)
    This collection of short stories uses tropes of horror - and particularly body horror - to relate the struggles faced by women and LGBTQ people. Stories include allowing the woman with the ribbon around her neck from an urban legend tell her life story and what seems to be a list of sexual partners growing into a story of a nationwide plague.  One story is synopses of Law and Order: SVU episodes that grow increasingly absurd and macabre. That story, and some others, went on too long and I lost focus. But overall this is a creepy and sexy collection of stories. 
  • (5/5)
    This was a terrific collection of weird & fantasy short fiction all of which had memorable twists and turns. The most immediately striking was "The Husband Stitch" which builds on various urban myths and legends incl. the green ribbon of In a "Dark, Dark Room and Other Scary Stories" and the missing mother in a Paris hotel room (which I remember Hemingway using in "The Torrents of Spring"). Another favourite was "The Resident" which was probably the most "normal" of the stories and seems like a bit of autobiographical fiction about a writer at an artists' retreat.Oddly, what lingers in my memory now (it has been a couple of weeks since I read it) is the story "Especially Heinous" which at the time of reading was the most difficult part of the book to get through. It is a 13 season episode by episode (22-24 episodes per season or 272 in total) synopsis of a fictional Law & Order: SVU series but one that seems to take place in an alternate universe with doppelgängers and death-eaters and such. It is at times a real chore to drag yourself through it. And yet... it sticks in the mind. You wonder why it was written at all, why was it written the way it was and what did it all mean? I don't know what challenge Machado was setting for herself, but she succeeds in getting under your skin and she leaves you thinking. You can't ask for better writing than that.This was part of Parisian bookstore Shakespeare and Company's inaugural Year of Reading 2018 which is a 12 book subscription series selected and curated by its staff. I have been immensely pleased by the variety of the selections.