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Crimen y Castigo

Crimen y Castigo


Crimen y Castigo

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (379 valoraciones)
Longitud:
2 horas
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2009
ISBN:
9789871471003
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

Esta novela plantea un profundo análisis psicológico de su protagonista, el joven estudiante Raskolnikov, cuya firme creencia en que los fines humanitarios justifican la maldad le conduce al asesinato de un usurero petersburgués. Pero, desde que comete el crimen, la culpabilidad será una pesadilla constante con la que el estudiante será incapaz de convivir. El estilo enfebrecido y compasivo de Dostoievski sigue con maestría única los recovecos de las contradictorias emociones del estudiante y refleja la lucha extrema que libra con su conciencia mientras deambula por las calles de San Petersburgo. Ya en prisión, Raskolnikov se da cuenta de que la felicidad no puede ser alcanzada siguiendo un plan establecido a priori por la razón: ha de ganarse con sufrimiento. Crimen y castigo alcanza su categoría de obra maestra por su conmovedor dibujo de la lucha interna de un hombre contra su espíritu enfermo, y por la intensidad de su narrativa.
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2009
ISBN:
9789871471003
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro

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4.4
379 valoraciones / 201 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (3/5)
    Raskolnikov, an impoverished former student in St. Petersburg spends a 100ish pages deciding whether or not to commit a murder and then another 500ish pages going in various mental circles about whether or not to turn himself in after he does commit the murder.The writing here is well done and the translation is also excellent as it doesn't have that stilted and removed feeling I've noted in several translated novels I've read recently. I can see why it's an enduring classic but I was kind of hate reading long passages of this. There are many sections where paragraphs stretch across multiple pages, which is exhausting to read, particularly when spending so much time inside the head of a character whose thoughts are convoluted but also circular. Also, Dostoyevsky's female characters often serve as little more than window dressing with no real careful examination of their internal lives. If you're on a classics kick, this isn't a terrible read but it isn't one I'll ever recommend.
  • (3/5)
    I read this so long ago I don't remember much. I've got to reread this at some point. It's what got me into surfacey Russian lit though.
  • (3/5)
    I loved and hated it at the same time. It was hard to get into the story as I mixed up the names all the time and it took me ages to get through. But I'm glad I finished it...
  • (5/5)
    Amazing book with a true grasp on human psychology
  • (4/5)
    Ordinary vs superior people.
  • (5/5)
    Classic. Story of one man who commits a murder to see if he can get away with it and the effects it has on everyone
  • (3/5)
    Interesting ideas about how people punish themselves and how they can be reborn, but confusing and a lot of random things
  • (5/5)
    F.D. had a window into the human soul. This is an incredibly good novel.
  • (5/5)
    A classic piece of fiction which is both deep and disturbing. A pefect choice for a book club to discuss.
  • (5/5)
    It was bitter cold last night. The trip from work to the kitchen was uneventful enough. I prepared soup and awaited my wife. After dinner, I placed Sonny Rollins' 9/11 Concert on the stereo and sat down with the last 52 pages of Crime and Punishment. the greatest testament I can afford the novel conclusion is that for 25 minutes I didn't hear any jazz, only Dostoevsky's denouement
  • (4/5)
    This book gripped me from beginning to end. While written off by some as melodramatic and emotional, I found Dostoyevsky's portrayal of his character's inner struggles to be real & enthralling. Raskolnikov is probably one of the best "nonsympathetic" characters ever because even so I still felt for him! Honourable mention to Svidrigailov who absolutely fascinated me throughout the story. The brief descriptions of the penal colony in the epilogue made me interested in reading more about Dostoyevsky's own experiences there (in Notes from a Dead House). I also read The Brothers K this year, which I felt had a much more satisfying arc, emotional climax, and ending on the whole. Still, C&P was a great read and I'm ready for more!
  • (4/5)
    Great psychological novel.
  • (4/5)
    I hate to give such as well known classic a low star rating. Maybe it's because I read the Pevear & Volokhonsky translation, or listened to it in audio. Or maybe Dostoevsky intentionally set out to make the reader feel the mental sickness/madness of the main character, like an unpleasant fever-dream. The first two chapters were great and promising, but the remaining melodramatic and plodding (a trait shared by some other 1850s and 60s classic novels). The best aspects are Dostoevsky's insights on human nature, but to get those ideas requires ascribing motives, thoughts and ideas to his characters that do not feel authentic; the characters are like projections of Dostoevsky himself thus lacking a believable psychology. I'm glad to have read it because it is so famous, but life is short so I look to the classics for a sure thing and this did not deliver. I read The House of the Dead which was great, so may give Dostoevsky another try later.
  • (5/5)
    The rating is for this specific translation by Oliver Ready. I didn't care for the over-colloquial tone of his dialogue choices, but reading in a different translation made this book a wonderful reading experience. Comparing translations was enlightening, as well.
  • (5/5)
    Read and pieced together 3 different versions totaling about 621 pages (see wikipedia for explanations of why so many versions) Russian writing at its best. Written after Dostoevsky returned from Siberian gulag; although this is not what the book is about. The book attempts to both solidify and crumble notions that one has about philosophy and the nature of sin. Great read! 621 pages
  • (3/5)
    A depressed man does some crime, is unhappy about the consequences.2.5/4 (Okay).This is my first Russian novel, and it's a 1960's translation, so I'm a little surprised how straightforward and modern the style is. The story's not great, though. Dostoyevsky clearly started writing with some ideas he wanted to put across, but no plan for exactly how he was going to do it. And while there are a lot of characters and individual scenes that I like quite a bit, they're mostly incidental.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing, phenomenal, and well deserved to be called a masterpiece. For some reason, I had in my head that it would be about the Crime, of course, and then being in prison, with long pondering about guilt, remorse, etc. - and very dry. But I was completely wrong. It was exciting, suspenseful, with intriguing sub-plots and many layers to be uncovered. Wonderful, and I highly recommend it!
  • (4/5)
    Well, it's a good book. Enjoyable enough. I found the first half a little harder to get through, but I knocked it out quickly enough. His writing style isn't exactly what I expected, but I found it useful in perhaps formulating my own. Though fictional, it's also one of those works that offers an excellent snapshot of a particular place and time, in this case late 19th Century Russia.
  • (5/5)
    Thanks to Crime and Punishment being a #1001Books and a read-a-long with some Litsy members, I finally got around to tackling this Russian masterpiece. Admittedly, my reading experience was enhanced by being able to discuss this book with the others: the memorable characters, the story, the feeling of dread that most of us felt, and comparing various translations. I started out with the Oliver Ready translation, but found the older (and reputedly less accurate) Constance Garnett translations to be more readable; so was switching back and forth frequently between the two versions.I am by no means a Dostoevsky expert after reading this or Notes from Underground recently, but found him far less intimidating than anticipated, and definitely plan to read his other works eventually.
  • (5/5)
    There is not much more I can say about this book that hasn't been said by hundreds of people throughout the years. On a personal note, I found this book to be outstanding and can easily see why it is considered one of the classics of literature. The way Dostoevsky gets into the mind of his character is as good writing as I have ever seen. The torment, guilt, hope, wonder, and range of dozens of emotions of the main character really hit home to the reader. I think everyone could connect in some way to the ideas in this story and although it is a slow read that takes some time, I think it is worth it for any avid reader.
  • (4/5)
    I actually liked the book, and it made me think about the meaning of life. A little bit of boring, but worth the time.
  • (5/5)
    For a long time, I have looked along shelves at the book store, looking for books to read, and every time, I skipped over the Classics section. Compared to the books of today, the Classics seemed like they would be more of a chore than a fun way to escape from reality. But one day, I decided to take the plunge into this pool of literary greatness. The first book I picked up was Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky. I wasn't sure what I was getting into when I read the very first page, but now, I understand why books like Crime and Punishment are called the Classics. There is a depth and complexity in Crime and Punishment that I haven't yet encountered. It may be from my limited exposure to such novels, but it still is something worth noting. Dostoevsky delves deep into the mind of man and takes us on a journey through love and hate, joy and despair, through this tale of a young man and his tormented life.It's not enough to look at Crime and Punishment as just a novel that follows the same basic pattern that has been followed for centuries. This is a book that is much deeper than that. The book follows the life of a ex-student named Raskolonikov (Some characters refer to him as different names, but this is the most common), a young man who lives in St. Petersburg, Russia. He lives in completely deplorable conditions: he barley lives on a few coins in a very small attic and flirts on the edge of sanity. In this state, Raskolonikov is not the usual protagonist and in fact, he may be the perfect definition of an antihero. Sometimes, however, I found myself lost as the story went on. The story would be centered around a single thought or idea and change radically in a manner of paragraphs. Other times, the same idea would get stuck and persist through whole passages, leaving a very long and, in some instances, a very tedious workload. The transition from thoughts to spoken word can be a bit hard to discern, though it could be just a problem of the translation. Some passages I really enjoyed, but others just dragged on for a long time. Crime and Punishment is one of those books that you shouldn't spend too log of time reading. It's not that it's short or something that is easy to read, but with the different characters and other factors, it's easy to forget where you are, who the characters are, and how that scene fits into the running plot if you leave it untouched for too long. But for the reasons stated above, it can get hard to keep rolling through the book. I sometimes found myself rereading certain passages to understand what was going on, only to become lost in the grand scheme of things.Crime and Punishment is one of the books you should read at least once. Dostoevsky covers the base ideas of man in a thoughtful and interesting way. This book was a wake-up call to the type of literature that I still need to read. But, parts of the book just seemed too drawn out and longer than what it should have been. It is a very dense book and almost every line seemed to have some sort of significance, promoting a close analyzation of almost everything. I enjoyed Crime and Punishment and, while not everyone will necessarily like it, recommend others to try and read it at least once.
  • (5/5)
    gripping....extremely
  • (3/5)
    I somehow made it through high school and a college English Lit degree without having read Crime and Punishment. Many years later, I finally read it though the help of an audiobook, and conclude I was not missing out on much. It's a good book and certainly hooked me in. The ending, however, seemed rushed and didn't leave me with any great thoughts or contemplations. Perhaps that was the point, but I would have liked a bit more.
  • (5/5)
    Crime and Punishment is a psychological thriller that takes the reader deep into the mind of Raskolnikov. Raskolnikov is a former student who is doing nothing with his life until he devises a radical theory. This theory hypothesizes that there are such men who are extraordinary enough to actually be above the law. He finally tests his theory, which spirals his life into a story of suffering and redemption. It is set in 18th century Russia, and draws the reader into the poverty and suffering filled world of a Russian peasant. It explores a large range of classes while also developing intricate characters, such as the borderline mad Raskolnikov, and the deeply religion Sonia. This is a book that everyone should read; Dostoevsky brings the reader on an incredible journey through the mind of Raskolnikov. While I will admit it does get slightly sluggish at times because there is a lot of Raskolnikov thinking to himself, it is quite necessary to the story and pays off in the character development.Evan B.
  • (4/5)
    Surprisingly easy read. Long though.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing, phenomenal, and well deserved to be called a masterpiece. For some reason, I had in my head that it would be about the Crime, of course, and then being in prison, with long pondering about guilt, remorse, etc. - and very dry. But I was completely wrong. It was exciting, suspenseful, with intriguing sub-plots and many layers to be uncovered. Wonderful, and I highly recommend it!
  • (3/5)
    in general, every russian novel i've read has knocked me for a loop. this one was no exception. and that's all i can think to say at the moment.
  • (5/5)
    This novel is the tale of Raskolnikov, who kills a miserly pawn broker as a first step in fulfilling his own destiny to turn genius into good. However, he suffers months of torment, ultimately confesses, and is redeemed by a nine-year prison sentence and the love of the innocent Sonia. I enjoyed this more than The Brothers Karamozov, even though the latter is considered his masterpiece. The plot is consistently interesting and the mix of details is perfect. Raskolnikov's character creates sympathy and suspense. I expected foreshadowing of Russia's collectivist future, but it manifested itself quite directly.
  • (3/5)
    This book is a Russian novel about the murder one man committs and the punishment he puts himself through. The novel takes a good look at how someone can punish themselves through guilt and worry. That punishment is worse than the punishment the character actually recieves after he confesses.