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The Day the World Came to Town: 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland

The Day the World Came to Town: 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland

Escrito por Jim DeFede

Narrado por Ray Porter


The Day the World Came to Town: 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland

Escrito por Jim DeFede

Narrado por Ray Porter

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (109 valoraciones)
Longitud:
6 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jun 27, 2017
ISBN:
9780062796684
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

Perfect for fans of the musical Come From Away!

When 38 jetliners bound for the United States were forced to land at Gander International Airport in Canada by the closing of U.S. airspace on September 11, the population of this small town on Newfoundland Island swelled from 10,300 to nearly 17,000. The citizens of Gander met the stranded passengers with an overwhelming display of friendship and goodwill.

As the passengers stepped from the airplanes, exhausted, hungry and distraught after being held on board for nearly 24 hours while security checked all of the baggage, they were greeted with a feast prepared by the townspeople. Local bus drivers who had been on strike came off the picket lines to transport the passengers to the various shelters set up in local schools and churches. Linens and toiletries were bought and donated. A middle school provided showers, as well as access to computers, email, and televisions, allowing the passengers to stay in touch with family and follow the news.

A HarperAudio production.

Editorial:
Publicado:
Jun 27, 2017
ISBN:
9780062796684
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro

Sobre el autor

Jim DeFede has been an award-winning journalist for sixteen years, first with the Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington, and then with the Miami New Times. His work has appeared in Talk, The New Republic, and Newsday. He is currently a metro columnist for the Miami Herald.


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  • (4/5)
    Terrific story of generosity, love, friendship shown by Newfoundlanders to hundreds of travelers stopped from entering the US because of 9/11.
  • (5/5)
    Hours after the attacks on the Twin Towers on Sept. 11, 2001, all aircraft in the United States were grounded. Planes were told to land at the closest airports. For 36 planes, many of them jumbo jets, the airport at Gander, Noewfoundland, was the closest, so those flights’ 7,000 passengers and crews became the guests of the town of 12,000 and the surrounding towns. What followed was nothing short of amazing. The hospitality gained world wide recognition, and for good reason. One of the most generous hosts was Canadian Tire, the Canadian hardware chain. That company offered anything in their stores and warehouses free of charge to the stranded travelers. Not only that, but Canadian Tire also paid for anything the people needed that was only available at other stores. That means $20,000 in their own merchandise was donated to the travelers and an additional $10,000 spent on items at other stores (mainly Walmart). DeFede is a journalist, and his book reads like a journalist’s feature story with interviews of more than 180 individuals. Their stories will make you smile; some will make you tear up. This is a quick read and well worth the few hours it will take you to read it.
  • (4/5)
    4.25 starsGander, Newfoundland has about 10,000 people. It was once a hub for airliners to stop to refuel, so it has lots of space for large aircraft. On 9/11, when the terrorists took down the Twin Towers in New York, air space in all of the United States was closed. Flights already in the air were ordered to land as soon as possible. 38 planes chose to, or were ordered to, land in Gander, adding 7,000 people in to the community who ended up staying for a few days before being able to get back on flights to continue on (or go back). When Gander declared a state of emergency, people were housed at schools, churches, and anywhere else that had room, while flight crews took over all the hotel rooms. The people in Gander donated hours of their time, items from their homes, food, and places to stay for some of the stranded passengers. Friendships (and maybe even at least one romance) were formed. The book was published in 2002, about a year after the events of the day. Some of the people the book followed included: a husband and wife returning from Kazakhstan with a little girl they’d just adopted; there was the parents of a missing firefighter in New York; there was royalty; there was a couple of higher-up people in well-known companies; there were a few Jewish people, in a town where most of the people had never met a Jewish person before, and more. I hadn’t thought about the animals that were on those planes, in the cargo hold!I’m Canadian. I grew up in a small town, and can see people reacting as the people of Gander did, doing everything they could do to help. 9/11 itself is an emotional topic, though I have no close personal connections to New York. This was emotional, it made me feel proud to be Canadian, to read about everything the people in Gander had done. I listened to the audio book, so I missed out on some photos that were included in the book. Overall, a really good (and emotional) account of what some of the people who were flying that day went through when they landed in a small isolated town in Eastern Canada.
  • (4/5)
    After the 9/11 attacks in New York, all airplanes were grounded and not allowed in US air space. This meant planes were landing all over Canada, but specifically in Gander, Newfoundland 38 planes landed with over 6500 passengers. Gander had a population of about 10,000. This story tells of the interactions between the passengers and many of the townspeople. The townspeople of Gander were amazingly open, supportive, and responsive to the needs of the passengers. One of the most memorable passengers was Werner Baldessarini, the CEO of Hugo Boos- a man not used to going to Walmart to purchase underwear. Another family, the Clarks had just adopted a girl from Kazakhstan are of special interest. They were one of the families who made the decision to stay in Gander rather than leave when their plane was allowed to leave, as it had to return to Europe.The stories are heart-warming of the kindness of the locals and the bonding of the passengers. My only fault with the book is that it probably glossed over some of the conflicts that were sure to existed when that many strangers are brought together.Saw "Come From Away" on Broadway - wonderful musical telling this story.
  • (4/5)
    The Day the World Came to Town: 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland is a book to read on a day when you just know that a good cry will make you feel so much better.When US airspace was closed on 9/11, 43,895 people were aboard airplanes diverted to Canadian airports. Thirty-eight planes, carrying 6,595 passengers landed in Gander, Newfoundland, a town of approximately 10,000 people.This book is the incredible story of the way in which the people of Gander responded to the events and took care of those stranded passengers and it will bring tears to your eyes.This is a book about triumph, not tragedy. It's a wonderful read.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely loved this book about the people of the small city of Gander, Newfoundland and the surrounding area, and how they coped with the influx of thousands of airliner passengers forced to land there when US airspace was closed on 9/11.There was so much to love about this book! Right off, Defede startled me into the realization that the US handed off some of our security nightmare to Canada, which the Canadians accepted without hesitation. After all, the fear was that there were more terrorists lurking on airplanes, right?The book takes a look at a number of folks whose travels and lives were interrupted by the plane diversion -- including (among others) the parents of a FDNY firefighter at Ground Zero, a couple returning to the US with a newly-adopted daughter, and a US general high up in the Army intelligence community.And then there are the "Newfies." The people of the Gander area went so far beyond allowing these people to land. They toook them to heart. They stripped their own beds so the visitors could have sheets. They invited strangers into their homes to shower, in those cases were the shelters lacked such facilities. They offered their telephones and internet connections and ears to hear sad stories. They cooked and commiserated. This book was filled with many, many heart-warming interactions between the Newfies and their guests.And in the process of reading, I learned a lot about Newfoundland, and the history of Gander -- and why in the world so many people wound up there on 9/11.I can't say enough good things about this book.
  • (5/5)
    If you want inspiration -- to feel hopeful about humankind, this is the book.
  • (5/5)
    What can I say about this book ... wow.I cried. I laughed. It was hard to read and yet I flew through it very quickly. I started it yesterday and did not want to put it down.For me, this is the first thing I've really read about 9/11 (or watched for that matter) since it occured. And the book took me back to some really awful moments, but yet, it offers hope and is uplifting to the spirit.
  • (5/5)
    Mind. Blown.I have had this on Mt. TBR for way too long but finally sat my butt down to read it once they announced the upcoming Broadway show. While I have doubts about how this will translate to stage, I fell in love with the book.Everyone knows the basics of how/why the world came to Gander but while Gander became synonymous with 9/11, I don't know how many people realized it was the entirety of New Foundland that stopped their lives to help the "plane people". And that's what grabbed me. From the Chairman of Hugo Boss to parents of Kevin O'Rourke, FDNY killed in the Towers to, to an Orthodox Rabbi who later met the only Jew in New Foundland to Barbara Fast, an Army Brigadier General based in Stuttgart...Each of these people were met & welcomed by the everyday people of Gander, Lewisporte, Gambo, Appleton and many other towns in New Foundland who became chauffeurs, cooks, hotel operators and every other need you could think of for those stranded in the five - six days after 9/11 with US airspace closed. This book, which reads like a novel, showed the good hearts of the Newfies and how both hosts and guests' lives were changed not just by the attacks on the US, but by the good people they met.Also "understand New Foundland" may be the best mnemonic for remembering how to pronounce the island's name.
  • (5/5)
    I don't think any of us will ever forget September 11, 2001. We don't even need the year to remind us what happened on 9/11. It was a day of unspeakable horror, shock, sadness, and anger. And yet, despite the incredible display of human hatred and aggression, we've all heard stories of equally incredible kindness and generosity and cooperation as strangers reached out to help one another. This book is one of those stories. When American airspace was closed that day, there were dozens of planes bound for the United States that were not going to be permitted to enter the country. Our neighbor, Canada, was faced with the dilema of either accepting the flights we were refusing or sending them back. When they decided to accept them, no one knew how long it would take before travellers could continue on to the US. In the case of Gander, Newfoundland, though, people didn't wait to find out. As soon as the decision was made to force US-bound flights to land, the townspeople began preparing for company. Even though it would be hours before passengers were allowed off the planes, shelters were being set up, food was being prepared, and transportation was being arranged for the waylayed travellers. Gander used to be the site of a US military base, and has long been used as a re-fueling stop for trans-Atlantic and military flights. They have the facilities to handle large aircraft and that day they received more than 3 dozen planes in-bound from Europe, carrying more than 6,000 people. The individual stories of how the 10,000 local residents cared for all those strangers - feeding them, giving them bedding and shelter, taking them shopping and sightseeing and drinking, inviting them into their homes for showers and offering their telephones and computers to contact loved ones, and then staying up most of the night watching over sleeping families and doing laundry so that there would be clean towels in the morning - were absolutely heartwarming. Sometimes, with the constant barrage of bad news in the media, it is refreshing to be reminded that people are mostly good. We are giving, caring and generous. It's only too bad that it takes a tragedy to be reminded of that. Highly recommended.
  • (3/5)
    reread for me. From a bookring. The story of what happened when the US Airspace closed after the terrorist attacks, with lots of planes heading for the US still in the air over the Atlantic. Gander ATC is responsible for all the air traffic crossing the Atlantic, and on 9/11 they were responsible for getting all the planes in the air down somewhere in eastern Canada. In the little town of Gander, 6000 "plane people" landed and needed shelter, food, clothing and communication to the outside. The author interviewed 179 people after the fact, and documented how well the little town mobilized and dealt with their unexpected influx of people from all different nationalities (and the pets that were in the cargo hold too). From essentials, such as getting new scrips to fill prescriptions, to food and shelter, to providing internet and communication to the outside world, Gander thought of and did everything. I was stranded away from home in Atlanta when the US airspace shut down. I personally know how much the little things, like shelter and being able to communicate with loved ones was. Wonderful that our neighbors to the North took every one in, no questions asked.
  • (5/5)
    This was an incredibly inspiring and thought provoking book. The kindness displayed by the population of Gander to so many people who were passengers on the planes that could not enter US air space, is overwhelming. I was touched by many of the stories - Orthodox Jewish people, and the the story of the Jewish chap who had lived in Newfoundland since the War years and not told his wife he was Jewish, the lady who left complete strangers in her home to shower inviting them to rest and relax and to simply close the door when they left. The trust of the Newfoundlanders during a time filled with mistrust was amazing. Not to mention the story of the young couple bringing back to the US their adopted daughter and of course the couple whose son was a firefighter in New York.
  • (4/5)
    I had never heard of this event.During and after 9/11, over 6000+ people landed in Gander, Newfoundland; a town that only had 12,000 people in it!The kindness and generosity of these citizens are explored in this well written book!!!
  • (4/5)
    If I started reading a book about 9/11 and a few pages into it found that an American General, a CEO of an international clothing conglomerate, several members of the board of a wealthy charity, an NYPD detective and parents of a firefighter who is lost in the World Trade Center were stuck in a small Canadian town in the middle of Newfoundland (not to mention a long-lost native son) I would have put the book away with a chuckle and started a new one.Nevertheless, this is not fiction and the events really happen.Even though I really liked the book, and even recommended it to my beloved wife, there are several glaring omissions.First and foremost for me: there is no map.The author goes to great length to describe the geographical region as well as the Gander's street layout (which is supposed to be shaped like the head of a moose) - yet...no map?I find this to be unbelievable.Second, the writing seems more like a collection of articles than a finished book. That's fine and it didn't bother me that much but I thought I should mention it.Third, it would be nice to have appendices with a chart of the flights, departure, landings at Gander International Airport, etc.Fourth, I would have liked to see more pictures. Again, this does not take away from the book but would have been a nice addition. There are several pictures in the book but they are small and grainy (much like...a newspaper article).Fifth, where is the tourist info for Newfoundland? Come on guys, capitalize on this book. I've been to your area (but not Gander), it is a beautiful, gorgeous part of the world and true to the book - some of the nicest people in the world live there.However, I still this book high marks because I did thoroughly enjoyed it since it is about the people of Newfoundland and not about the big events happening around them. The only part which took away my personal enjoyment was the first bullet point I mentioned (and yes, I did google the town and found the map but I still can't "see" the moose head layout).
  • (5/5)
    There have been many stories of heroism surrounding the events of 9/11. Jim DeFede covers a story of Gander, Newfoundland in Canada, where 38 planes were forced to land due to the closure of the U.S. air space. DeFede introduces us to the town and its people, and the extraordinary sense of community on 9/11. This is a must-read, not only to round out the experience of 9/11, but to know that there are people out there that can cancel out the horrible events of that day.
  • (5/5)
    There are lots of wonderful stories and profiles in this book, covering one small location of people dealing with the immediate aviation crisis of 9/11. Warming glimpses of people acting their best. My favorite though is Werner Baldessarini, who refused to accept special provisions and a private jet to come and get him. His story is scattered throughout, but his core decision to stay with his fellow travelers is on page 193.
  • (5/5)
    Outstanding book.
  • (5/5)
    The love and giving nature of the town of Gander, Newfoundland when planes diverted from United States airspace on September 11 had to land and disembark in their small town.
  • (5/5)
    Fair warning, best to read this when there’s a high pollen count so you’ve got an alternate explanation for why your eyes are watering.
  • (5/5)
    Absolutely amazing book! A must read! Need a reminder that there are still good people in this world? This book will help you out.
  • (5/5)
    Great example of the way we ALL should be like.
  • (5/5)
    Just the book I need right now. If it wasn’t so cold, Newfoundland would be my retirement destination.
  • (5/5)
    Such an eye opener for anyone wanting to gain some perspective on the wide spread impact of 9/11 and the amazing way people responded.
  • (5/5)
    Human kindness,in a crisis ,why can't we always be like that
  • (5/5)
    “Despite the risks, Canada didn’t hesitate to accept the orphaned planes.”

    On 9/11, when the United States closed its airspace, the danger posed by the passengers, and the responsibility for their lives, was deflected to Canada.

    Canada's response:
    WELCOME TO CANADA!!!

    The stories from Gander are the best of human kindness. Jim DeFede has gathered the warmth, humor, pain, and generosity of a remarkable moment in history.

    Everyone should read this book.

    *audible note: I enjoyed the steady, warm, male narrators voice: a dad's voice.

    Currently free with Prime and I listened to the audio on Scribd.
  • (4/5)

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

    Inspiring account of what happened in Gander, New Foundland, on September 11 and the several days following the murder of thousands of people in New York's Twin Towers by a group of rabid Islamists.When almost ten thousand strangers descended on their little city with no place to go and nothing to eat, the citizens of Gander (and surrounding towns) stepped up and made a home for those forced out of the air before they could reach their final destinations in the United States. These people became a second family to the travelers while helping them get through the confusion of the situation they all found themselves in.This one gives you a little hope about the inherent goodness of the human race. I wish I had more of that hope sometimes.

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

  • (5/5)
    This beautiful story was so uplifting. It’s a nonfiction account of a tiny town in Newfoundland that welcomed thousands of people to their town on 9/11. Despite having limited resources and people, they opened their doors to care for the stranded airplane passengers when all flights were grounded. At a time when people were heartbroken, the folks from Gander showed the best of humanity. FYI the musical Come From Away is based on this book!
  • (5/5)
    Words are failing me. Everything I come up with seems inadequate to describe the events of this book and it occurs to me that if I'm finding words inadequate after experiencing this third-hand, I'd have had a nervous breakdown trying to thank anyone who was as kind and generous to me as the people of Gander were to all those stranded passengers. I don't think I've ever in my life said to anyone "you have to read this!!" but I'll say it now - everyone should read this. Given the constant stream of evidence we get every single day of the dark things humanity rains down upon this earth, this book gives us a powerful glimpse into the pure unadulterated goodness humanity is capable of. Every single page of this book was filled with examples of extraordinary kindnesses; things the people of Gander and the surrounding towns did that they didn't have to do; things that went above and beyond making sure those that were stranded were comfortable and had the necessities. Newfoundland is an economically repressed island trying to survive the death of the fishing industry, but they didn't hesitate to throw birthday parties for the kids, or set up a kosher kitchen (requiring all new pots and pans, mind you) for the Orthodox Jews stranded there. They gave away everything they had if it was needed, including camping equipment for those that didn't want to sleep inside the shelters. I could go on and on but instead you should just read this book, or hell, if there's another book out there about Gander on 9/11, read that one instead, but either way, these people need to be the shining example of the standard all people should set for themselves, every day. Prepare for a teary read, but in a good way. There are a couple of moments of profound sadness, but 99% of this book is all about goodness. Profound, tear-inducing goodness. I didn't go the whole 5-star hog because the author is a journalist by trade and while he does a stunning job–truly–the overall narrative read like a really long newspaper article and that's just not my preferred style. Additionally there were too many missing words and editing errors to completely ignore. So subjectively, 4.5 stars, but objectively, 4.75.
  • (4/5)

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. On September 11, 2001, over three dozen planes landed unexpectedly in Gander, Newfoundland when American air space was closed. This is the story of how the 10,000 residents of Gander and neighbouring small towns prepared for and welcomed 6,000 shocked displaced travellers.I found the drama of trying to divert so many planes riveting. The issues that arose in handling so many unexpected guests, and how the town leaders and RCMP responded were also fascinating: nicotene gum for smokers held on airplanes; prescriptions to fill, animals in cargo holds; Kosher meals and many more challenges all met with generosity and understanding.The people who found themselves in Gander really did represent the world: a Nigerian princess, Beatles impersonators, CEOs, parents of a fire fighter lost in the World Trade Centre, women in burkas, parents bringing home babies adopted in Asia....the list is endless. Through it all, the Newfoundlanders welcomed people into their homes, took them sightseeing, even watched over them while they slept. It made me pround to be Canadian.

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  • (5/5)

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    I haven't read any books that deal with 9/11. Though the events were ten years ago, they seem closer than that to me, and have shaped much of my adult life. I wanted to somehow commemorate the tenth anniversary of September 11, but I was afraid to read something that might turn dark and dismal. This story of townspeople reaching out to people whose planes were forced to land when U.S. airspace was shut down would be just the thing - true, yet uplifting. Still, especially in the beginning, when various people - pilots, air traffic controllers, the mayor of Gander - hear about or watch the planes fly into the towers, my heart starts pounding and my muscles tense. I find myself curling up tight in my chair, breathless. I didn't expect such a visceral response, or to feel instantly transported to the confusion and fear of that day, only my second week of college classes, the first class an English class from 9:30-11:15, our professor never breathing a word (did he not know?). And I remember how strange was the absence of the noise of airplanes, then the recurrence of them overhead. There were 6,132 passengers, plus pilots and crews, on the flights diverted to Gander, Newfoundland. The townspeople could have put up a few shelters, called in the Red Cross, and called it a day. Instead, DeFede tells the stories of ordinary and extraordinary kindnesses - people giving their own towels to shelters, opening their homes, offering rides, and filling prescriptions free of charge. The stories of 6,000+ people could not fit in one book, but the stories of several are told here, often switching back and forth quickly between people keeping events in roughly chronological order through the several days Gander and the surrounding towns embraced their unexpected guests. Their stories made me laugh and cry in turn. I can't promise that I'll read any other books about 9/11, but I'm certainly not disappointed I read this one.

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