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The Trapped Girl

The Trapped Girl

Escrito por Robert Dugoni

Narrado por Emily Sutton-Smith


The Trapped Girl

Escrito por Robert Dugoni

Narrado por Emily Sutton-Smith

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (68 valoraciones)
Longitud:
11 horas
Publicado:
Jan 24, 2017
ISBN:
9781531864255
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

When a woman's body is discovered submerged in a crab pot in the chilly waters of Puget Sound, Detective Tracy Crosswhite finds herself with a tough case to untangle. Before they can identify the killer, Tracy and her colleagues on the Seattle PD's Violent Crimes Section must figure out who the victim is. Her autopsy, however, reveals she may have gone to great lengths to conceal her identity. So who was she running from?

After evidence surfaces that their Jane Doe may be a woman who suspiciously disappeared months earlier, Tracy is once again haunted by the memory of her sister's unsolved murder. Dredging up details from the woman's past leads to conflicting clues that only seem to muddy the investigation. As Tracy begins to uncover a twisted tale of brutal betrayal and desperate greed, she'll find herself risking everything to confront a killer who won't go down without a deadly fight. Once again, New York Times bestselling author Robert Dugoni delivers a taut, riveting thriller in the fourth installment of his acclaimed Tracy Crosswhite series.

Publicado:
Jan 24, 2017
ISBN:
9781531864255
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor

A Seattle7Writers project for literacy, this novel was written by Kathleen Alcalá, Matthew Amster-Burton, Kit Bakke, Erica Bauermeister, Sean Beaudoin, Dave Boling, Deb Caletti, Carol Cassella, William Dietrich, Robert Dugoni, Kevin Emerson, Karen Finneyfrock, Clyde Ford, Jamie Ford, Elizabeth George, Mary Guterson, Maria Dahvana Headley, Teri Hein, Stephanie Kallos, Erik Larson, David Lasky, Stacey Levine, Frances McCue, Jarret Middleton, Peter Mountford, Kevin O'Brien, Julia Quinn, Nancy Rawles, Suzanne Selfors, Jennie Shortridge, Ed Skoog, Garth Stein, Greg Stump, Indu Sundaresan, Craig Welch and Susan Wiggs. Foreword by Nancy Pearl. Introduction by Garth Stein.

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4.4
68 valoraciones / 19 Reseñas
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  • (5/5)
    This was probably my favorite Tracy Crosswhite book. A young fisherman finds a woman in a crab pot and many mysteries unfold.The story involved jurisdiction between police departments, more murders, questions about identities, and twists I didn't see coming. I spent much of the time reading certain that I had solved the mystery only to change my mind, feel a new certainty, and was eventually shocked with the reveal. That's exactly how I like my mysteries!And the epilogue...
  • (5/5)
    In this fourth outing with Tracy Crosswhite, we are once again taken for a twisting and turning crime investigation, this time, trying to work with another officer in a different jurisdiction.
    A teenager is doing some illegal crab fishing and pulls up someone else's crab pot. As he attempts to see what is in it to make it so heavy, he drops it back in the water with shock. There is a body, a woman's body based on the blue nails, in the pot. Once the police arrive it is confirmed that the body is a woman, and she hasn't been down there long. Finding her so quickly is fate, as the assumption was that the murderer never expected her to be seen again. They soon believe the body is a woman that disappeared several months ago while climbing a mountain with her husband, but was assumed dead. Enter another police jurisdiction who wants the case, as it was their missing person case in the beginning. Trying to deal with them, Nolasco, and all the roadblocks leaves Tracy and her team with a huge puzzle to solve.

    The story is told from two different perspectives. Andrea Strickland, the victim tells her story, and Tracy narrates from the investigation side. It works quite well. We see Tracy trying to deal with a case that reminds her too much of her sister's murder. Is she making decisions based on emotions? She is balancing work with her relationship with her boyfriend Dan. I enjoyed seeing her personal life scattered throughout the story, and that things seem to be working out for her and Dan. , and I loved the little glimpses we got into their happy life. A fine addition to the Tracy Crosswhite series. Just when I thought I had it figured out, something happened and it went in a completely new direction. If you enjoy a twisty story with crime investigations, a bit of a personal glimpse into the police detectives lives, then you will love not only this book, but the whole Tracy Crosswhite series.
  • (4/5)
    Like many high school students, Kurt Schill wanted to get some extra money. His plan was to buy a small boat, catch crabs in Puget Sound, and sell them. In order to increase his earnings, he didn’t mind breaking a few laws, like going out-of-season, launching his boat illegally to avoid having to pay fees, and going before the sun rose and trying not to disturb people living in the area who would report him.It worked for him until very early one morning, when it was still dark, he tried to pull up the crab pot he had placed along the bottom. It was much heavier than it should have been and when it finally broke the surface, he realized it wasn’t his. The pot was full, not only of crabs. Then he saw a hand. Kurt called the police department and Tracy Crosswhite responded. When she got to the site, the body was still in the pot. After it was removed and examined, the next step was to identify it. That became very complicated when the police discovered the woman had received plastic surgery and implants to change her appearance. Eventually, they learn that the implants belong to a woman who disappeared several months ago. (The corpse died rather recently.)The case becomes more complicated as suspects and reasons that some people may have wanted to get rid of her increase. Then politics make it even harder for Tracy to solve the case.Several chapters are written from the viewpoint of the missing woman.THE TRAPPED GIRL is well-written, though it takes some concentration, and keeps the reader guessing.
  • (4/5)
    Forty-three year old homicide detective Tracy Crosswhite is called to the scene when a young man illegally harvesting crabs in Puget Sound inadvertently snags a crab pot containing human remains. "The Trapped Girl," by Robert Dugoni, is the story of twenty-two year old Andrea Strickland, who had a traumatic childhood that left her lonely, depressed, and emotionally scarred. She works for an insurance company, but prefers to spend her free time immersed in her favorite pastime--reading. At least Andrea has the solace of knowing that she will come into a great deal of money, thanks to a trust fund set up by her late parents. After a whirlwind courtship, corporate attorney Graham Strickland proposes to Andrea and she marries him. Only later does she realize how little she really knows about her new husband.

    This is a complex and cleverly plotted thriller. Tracy and her capable "A Team," Kinsington Rowe, Vic Fazzio, and Delmo Castigliano, must identify the aforementioned Jane Doe in the crab pot before they can find her killer. This case will be far more taxing than they had anticipated, especially since they face jurisdictional problems that could stymie their investigation. Departmental politics and an uncooperative supervisor do not deter Tracy, who has personal reasons for pursuing the perpetrator. She will not quit until she accomplishes what she has set out to do.

    Dugoni's fast-paced, complex, and cleverly plotted police procedural has intriguing italicized passages in which Andrea provides background information and a unique perspective on a series of perplexing events that can be interpreted in various ways. As the mystery deepens, there are surprising developments and a final twist that may a bit too far-fetched to accept unquestioningly. Still, "The Trapped Girl" is engrossing, thanks to its lively prose, witty dialogue, colorful characters, wry humor, and picturesque setting. The author effectively demonstrates how challenging it is to outsmart ruthless, self-serving, and vicious adversaries who will do anything, no matter how repellant, to get what they want.
  • (5/5)
    A high schooler dragging in one of his crab pots accidentally snags another one. This one contains a woman’s body. Detective Tracy Crosswhite and her team are called in to identify the body and investigate the murder. Thus begins the exciting roller coaster ride to the finale. Interspersed with the present day story are flashbacks that the victim tells. Through her letters to a friend, the reader learns about her life and its tragedies. Author Robert Dugoni drops clues but gives nothing obvious away in the exciting quest to the Find the killer. Though part of a series, this book can stand on its own, but after you read one, you will want to read the rest.
  • (5/5)
    When a young woman's body is discovered inside a crab pot pulled from the Puget Sound, Detective Tracy Crosswhite is called to the scene. During the search to discover who this young woman is it becomes apparent that things aren't as they seem. Was the woman running from someone and they caught up to her, or is the woman in the crab pot really who detectives think she is?

    I really enjoyed this novel! I love the series and also love the author!

    I received a copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
  • (3/5)
    When a body is found in a crab pot, Detective Tracy Crosswhite has to solve a crime where multiple people could be the murderer. As she ties to find the identity of the victim, she finds that. Conflicting clues make the solution difficult.
  • (3/5)
    Riveting and hard to put down, this mystery is haunting and mesmerizing. When a body is found in a crab pot by a young boy who is illegally fishing in waters where he should not be, local detectives and police are left to discover the identity of the woman.There are lots of twists and turns. It is well written and captivating, I will search for more books by this author.
  • (3/5)
    I had high hopes for this book. It started out with an interesting case, the team was working together again, there was some inter-departmental politics going on, and Tracy and Dan were moving forward with their relationship but it wasn't a major focal point of the book.Then at about 80% through, things stopped working for me and it ended up being a frustrating read with a disappointing reveal. I ended up rereading sections hoping I missed something but I hadn't. There was a lot of potential for this to be the best book in the series but it didn't end up that way. Not for me, anyway. I received a copy of the book from the publisher, via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.
  • (4/5)
    This is the thrilling fourth novel in the Tracy Crosswhite series. Tracy is a detective in Seattle PD's Violent Crimes Section and is facing her most complex case yet when a woman's body is recovered from a crab pot in the waters of Puget Sound. Identification initially proves difficult, but some clues lead Tracy and her team to believe they have discovered Andrea Strickland, who disappeared after climbing Liberty Ridge in Mount Rainier National Park with her husband Graham, a sleazy lawyer. But things just don't add up.The story alternates between providing the reader with first-person POV background on Andrea Strickland and Tracy's investigation. Twists and turns galore combined with taut writing, enjoyable dialogue, and solid characterization - not only of the main players but the entire team behind Tracy - made this another compelling read in this series. I've been addicted to this since My Sister's Grave, the first in the series, and am already looking forward to the release of Close to Home later this year.I received an ARC via NetGalley. I purchased the audiobook which was once again narrated superbly by Emily Sutton-Smith.
  • (5/5)
    Detective Tracy Crosswhite returns in The Trapped Girl, the fourth in this excellent series. This time she and her crew are confronted with the body of a woman which has been found in a crab pot in the Puget Sound. It becomes clear that her identification will not be easy and in fact it appears she might have tried to conceal who she is. Why? Who is she fleeing from? Finding the answer will lead Tracy into a maze of greed and betrayal. The writing is excellent, as usual, and the plotting fast and convoluted. Loved it.DP Lyle, award-winning author of the Jake Longly, Samantha Cody, and Dub Walker thriller series
  • (4/5)
    I received a copy of the Trapped Girl from Netgalley. Many thanks to Thomas and Mercer and Robert Dugoni. I have read several books by Robert Dugoni and I have enjoyed all of them and this one did not disappoint! This book had an excellent plot and we'll developed characters. This is the 4th book in this series, but can easily be read if you haven't read the previous books. Tracy Crosswhite, a detective is called to a murder scene where a woman is found dead in a crab pot off of Puget Sound. This is a suspenseful murder mystery, where there are many twists and turns. It kept me turning the pages to find out what happens.If you like a good mystery, I would highly recommend this book.
  • (5/5)
    This was my first book in the Crosswhite series, and book by Robert Dugoni, that I've read and it was great! Teenager stumbles upon a dead body in a crab pot one morning and you have yourself a mystery. There were a lot of twists and turns and always kept me on my toes. I'd try to figure out "who dunnit" and kept changing my mind throughout. I enjoyed this fast paced mystery and would definitely recommend.
  • (3/5)
    This plot was VERY slow. Not bad- has some good plot twists
  • (4/5)
    A woman’s body is found in a crab pot submerged in Puget Sound and Seattle Detective Tracy Crosswhite and her team catch the case. Before the murder is solved the team will need to solve two missing person mysteries, a second murder, and fight off an effort by the Tacoma PD to take over the case. To make it more difficult, Tracy’s boss would more than happy to transfer the case to Tacoma. And while all of this is going on developments occur in Tracy’s personal life.This is the fourth book by Dugoni featuring Seattle Detective Tracy Crosswhite. I had not read any of the earlier books but my lack of familiarity with the characters and setting did not interfere with my ability to understand and enjoy The Trapped Girl.This is a solid offering that I docked half a star for two reasons. First, the insensitive, hostile boss is a common cliché that seems to be especially prevalent in murder mysteries. In this instance, it is only slightly intrusive as it doesn’t interfere with the pacing of the story. This strategy for introducing conflict and tension has become so commonplace it seems like it is a sign of lazy author.It is the use of frequent flashback during the first half of the book that mars the pacing of the story. Once the main storyline has been established and the primary characters have been introduced the use of flashbacks is intrusive. That is especially true in The Trapped Girl because Dugoni uses the flashbacks to introduce new characters not present in the main story. The flashbacks tell how the victim of the first murder met her husband and how she came to be the victim. As a reader, I am quite content to let the dead person be dead. The pace of the story could have been tightened and the book shortened if the author had let the detectives provide those detail as they make discoveries while working the case. Every time I came to a flashback I was tempted to put the book down. The flashbacks do create sympathy for the victim, but the content was rather boring.The book ends with a surprising twist that is a bit of a cheat. The author failed to provide enough clues that the reader has a fair chance to solve the murder. In fact, Detective Crosswhite doesn’t identify the murdered until new information turns up a few pages from the end. I won’t go into that in greater detail for fear of spoiling the ending for readers. Despite these flaws, I enjoyed The Trapped Girl. I am not inclined to go back and read the three earlier books in this series but will be on the lookout for future offerings.
  • (5/5)
    The trapped Girl by Robert DugoniTracy Crosswhite Series #45 StarsFrom The Book:When a woman’s body is discovered submerged in a crab pot in the chilly waters of Puget Sound, Detective Tracy Crosswhite finds herself with a tough case to untangle. Before they can identify the killer, Tracy and her colleagues on the Seattle PD’s Violent Crimes Section must figure out who the victim is. Her autopsy, however, reveals she may have gone to great lengths to conceal her identity. So who was she running from?After evidence surfaces that their Jane Doe may be a woman who suspiciously disappeared months earlier, Tracy is once again haunted by the memory of her sister’s unsolved murder. Dredging up details from the woman’s past leads to conflicting clues that only seem to muddy the investigation. As Tracy begins to uncover a twisted tale of brutal betrayal and desperate greed, she’ll find herself risking everything to confront a killer who won’t go down without a deadly fight. My Views:I have read and enjoyed this series consistently since the first book, "My Sister's Grave". The characters continue to grow and develop with each addition. Robert Dugoni is an exceptional storyteller. He weaves the plot giving it texture with many twists and turns but doesn't waste time and space with story lines that add absolutely nothing to the plot and just fill space. Even though I constantly ROO this series needs to be followed in order to better understand the character of Tracy Crosswhite The one thing that I had to chuckle at with one of the main characters was that she was described several times as an introvert. Why was she an introvert?....because she read and collected hundreds of books. Seems she was never without a book. Well...hello to all my introvert friends here who are reading this:)
  • (5/5)
    I received a free advance e-copy of this book via publisher invitation through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Wow!! Another great Tracy Crosswhite police procedural. A teenager who is fishing illegally for crab off Puget Sound finds a woman’s body in a crab pot. A woman has disappeared while mountain climbing with her husband and may be dead which brings another jurisdiction into the mix. This book has multiple layers and is full of twists and turns with money, greed, betrayal, a rogue cop, and drugs all involved. Tracy continues to have thoughts of her sister and her past but she is moving forward with her life as the author lets us see her softer side. This is a well-written police procedural with an amazing plot and excellent character development. Robert Dugoni throws in a few surprises for good measure that grab the reader’s interest right up until the very end when the case is resolved. I really enjoyed the Epilogue and hope that Tracy has found some happiness. This is an excellent book and well worth the read. I look forward to reading more about Tracy and her colleagues in the future.
  • (5/5)
    4.5 starsThe Trapped Girl is the fourth in a series by Robert Dugoni about a detective with Seattle’s Violent Crimes Section named Tracy Crosswhite. I have not read the first three but easily picked up the story line and thoroughly enjoyed this installment. As the story opens, a teenage boy illegally crabbing pulls up his crab trap and finds a woman’s dead body. The woman was shot before she was dumped in the Puget Sound so Tracy Crosswhite’s unit is summoned and subsequently commences the process of attempting to solve the murder. During the autopsy, the medical examiner determines that the victim had undergone substantial facial reconstructive surgery in an effort to conceal her identity. Initially, the victim is identified as Lynn Hoff, but quickly the team realizes that it may in fact be Andrea Strickland, an insurance agent who went missing on Mt. Ranier months previously while hiking with her husband. As Tracy continues her investigation, she discovers that the many facts and clues conflict and that something more complicated has occurred. She and her team must piece together every detail to ascertain what truly happened and who the mystery woman is.The story is fast-paced and includes numerous twists and turns – most of which I did not see coming (I love that!). The plot takes Tracy from Mt. Ranier to Oregon in her quest to solve the identity of the dead woman and how she met her demise. The various settings made the tale so interesting. The Trapped Girl is a complicated and well-written story with a fabulous resolution that made sense and was believable (believability is something that is lacking in many thrillers today). Learning about the various hikes on Mt. Ranier and other fun facts about the mountain was one of the highlights of the book for me. Another was the manner in which Dugoni chose to tell his tale. He alternates between Andrea’s journal entries and a standard third person voice for the rest of the novel. The result is outstanding. Dugoni also perfectly balances writing about the mystery plot line and Tracy’s personal life which makes the book such a great read. I am sure striking that balance is hard as an author, but when it does occur the story is so much better than when too little or too much focus is on the detective’s own life.I highly recommend this wonderful mystery. Thanks to Thomas and Mercer and NetGalley for the chance to read this ARC in exchange for an honest review.
  • (2/5)
    This is the fourth book in the Tracy Crosswhite series. Hopefully unnecessary caveat: There may well be spoilers in here for the first three books in the series.When a high school student takes his boat out to an uninhabited island to poach crabs, he has no idea what he’s getting into. Tangled up in his trap line is another crab trap, one with the body of a woman inside . . .Enter detective Tracy Crosswhite, still recovering from the events of previous novels. Crosswhite, who has a soft spot for young female murder victims after the death of her sister, is determined to find out who killed this woman and stuffed her body in a crab trap in Puget Sound. But identifying the victim turns out to be only the beginning. The more Crosswhite learns about the young woman in the trap, the more intricate and convoluted the mystery becomes.I’m going to come right out and say it: I did not finish this book. The synopsis sounds great, and for the most part the mystery was intriguing. I was getting flashes of “Gone Girl” while reading certain parts. But I just couldn’t get behind Crosswhite as a main character. We just didn’t have any chemistry. Towards the middle of the book, I found myself skipping over page after page of baby-crazy contemplation on her part, and after a while, I just felt that life is too short to keep reading a book I’d lost interest in.This doesn’t necessarily mean that this is not a good book. A mystery aficionado should give The Trapped Girl a try. I have mixed feelings about this book. I, personally, did not like the main character, and I also don’t crack open mystery novels to hear a central female character pine about wanting a child. Yet the mystery, without the added-on drama, was an interesting one, and one that unfolded in unexpected ways.So, long story short, I didn’t like this book very much, but I certainly don’t discourage others for giving it a shot.An advance ebook was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. The Trapped Girl will be available for purchase on January 24th, 2017.