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Francotirador: La Autobiografía Del Francotirador Más Letal En La Historia De Estados Unidos De América

Francotirador: La Autobiografía Del Francotirador Más Letal En La Historia De Estados Unidos De América


Francotirador: La Autobiografía Del Francotirador Más Letal En La Historia De Estados Unidos De América

valoraciones:
3.5/5 (18 valoraciones)
Longitud:
10 horas
Publicado:
Feb 24, 2015
ISBN:
9780829702354
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Fascinante, reveladora y poderosa, Francotirador la asombrosa autobiografía del Capitán SEAL Chris Kyle, el francotirador que tuvo el récord más alto en la historia militar estadounidense.
En Francotirador, Kyle relata la extraordinaria historia de su carrera que duró una década. El fascinante relato de cómo pasó de ser un cowboy de rodeos de Texas a ser un experto franco tirador y temido asesino, ofrece una perspectiva única de la guerra actual y una de las descripciones más profundas, reveladoras y jamás escritas del mundo secreto de Special Ops (Operaciones Especiales) de Estados Unidos.
Esta obra, también honra a los compañeros de guerra de Kyle, que lucharon dentro y fuera del campo de batalla, así como con conmovedores relatos de su esposa Taya, quien habla abiertamente de las presiones de la guerra en su matrimonio, sus hijos, y en Chris.
Extraordinario, inolvidable y cargado de adrenalina, el relato de Kyle se sitúa como una de las mejores autobiografías de guerra de todos los tiempos.
Publicado:
Feb 24, 2015
ISBN:
9780829702354
Formato:
Audiolibro

Sobre el autor

SEAL Team 3 Chief Chris Kyle (1974–2013) was awarded two Silver Stars, five Bronze Stars with Valor, and numerous other citations. Following four combat tours in Iraq, he became chief instructor for training Naval Special Warfare sniper teams. He is the author of American Gun: A History of the U.S. in Ten Firearms. A native Texan, Kyle is survived by his wife, Taya, and their two children.


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  • (3/5)
    I started reading this book as part of a "Big Read." I must confess I couldn't get into it. But once I'd read a little it got quite gripping. The book is not all about one man killing tens of hundreds of enemy soldiers. On the contrary the most telling comment that Chris Kyle makes in the book is "It's not about the people you saved that you remember; it's the ones you couldn't save." We who are blase about war and sit on our couches and discuss the merits and demerits of an encounter ought to read this book which tells it from the frontlines.
  • (3/5)
    There have been so many wildly differing opinions about Chris Kyle, his memoir, and movie Clint Eastwood made from it that I long ago decided that the only opinion I could trust is my own, so here goes. After just a few pages it became apparent that to fairly review Kyle’s book one must first, and separately, express one’s views on Kyle himself. Then, and only then, will I be able to review the book itself.In my younger days I served as a Navy corpsman assigned to a Marine Corps unit. I found the Marines I served with different from anyone else I had ever known. Their view of the world was unlike mine in almost every way. They were more likely to see things in black and white. They were often rude, crude and socially unacceptable. Their interest in understanding the enemy extended only to learning how best to kill them. Very few of them were any good at literary discussions. Despite that, they took their duties very seriously. Becoming Marines was the crowning achievement of their lives. They were very dedicated and extremely loyal. If I ever found myself in trouble, there is nobody on earth that I would rather have watching my back. These men were warriors. The word ‘warrior’ applies to any combat soldier, Marine, SEAL or any other military personnel whose primary career is to engage an enemy by direct action. A warrior’s job is to kill the enemy, and do it efficiently. An effective warrior achieves no benefit from recognizing the humanity of the enemy. Doing so only hinders his ability to accept and live with the life he has chosen. He is neither a psycho killer nor a hero. He’s just doing his job. Chris Kyle was a warrior, and a very good one. If you find this distasteful, your distaste is misdirected. It is war and the politicians who start them that deserve our scorn. Winston Churchill once said “We sleep soundly in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm.” As long as we live in a world where such men are needed, I will be grateful that men such as Kyle exist. Now for my impressions of the book itself. The truth is that I enjoyed it but it could have been better. It read less like an autobiography and more like a collection of anecdotes. The chapters were broken down into sections, many of less than a page, each relating an incident that occurred during his training or deployments in Iraq. As I read it I pictured Kyle sitting with a ghost writer and tape recorder, telling stories and answering question. I did. The short sections made it easy to read and the anecdotal delivery reminds me of an exchange of war stories told over a few beers at the local watering hole. Such exchanges can reveal more about the speaker than intended and Kyle is often overly candid regarding his view of the Iraqis, politicians and officers. What the book does best is describe the role snipers played in Iraq. I have read several books on the war and American Sniper provided an unparalleled picture of snipers’ roles during the campaigns in Fallujah and Ramadi and how they supported other military units.One section of the book that falls short is where Kyle describes the weapons and equipment he used. This must have been a difficult section to write because the writer must answer the questions of those ignorant of firearms while not boring those who are already familiar with the tools of the trade. As a veteran who is not unfamiliar with weapons I should have had no trouble in following everything he said on the subject. Even so, I found myself struggling with some of the technical jargon he used. In addition, some equipment he mentioned such as VS-17 panels, bright orange pieces of cloth displayed to identify themselves to friendly forces, were not adequately described until more than 150 pages after they were first mentioned. This makes me think that readers would be greatly aided by a glossary at the back of the book.Some critics have said that Kyle was an egotist. While I have never known a SEAL who wasn’t, the book does little to dissuade that opinion. In the section on equipment he says that his headgear of choice was a baseball cap because ‘you look so much cooler wearing a ball cap.’ He also wasn’t above expressing the typical enlisted man’s tongue-in-cheek scorn of officers with such remarks as ‘but then I’m just a SEAL and obviously don’t understand those sorts of complicated issues’. I found the book interesting, more so than the movie. I’m a bit of a history buff so I found the first person description of combat in the Iraq war informative. Kyle’s memoir was more candid than most and I suspect that readers who don’t often read first person accounts of war may struggle to appreciate his point of view. *The review copy of this book was obtained from a friend and neighbor who is a retired Navy submariner. Thanks, Bob, for your service and for the loan of this book.
  • (3/5)
    According to the book jacket, Chris Kyle recorded the most career kills in the United States military history from 1999 to 2009.The autobiography tells of Chris growing up in mid Texas and his love of excitement and physical activity. Among his activities in his younger days was busting broncos.Early on, Chris admits that he likes to have fun. He was brought up in the Christian faith and if he had to prioritise his beliefs they would be God, Country and Family.Chris's story is told in brief episodes of his life and experiences. He tells how, when he decided to join the military, he went to the Marines first but they were out to lunch, then he considered the Army and thought of being in the Army Special Forces but it was when he was leaving that recruiter's office that a Naval recruiter spoke to him and asked if had ever heard of the NAVY SEALS.Chris had four deployments to Iraq and describes his training to become a SEAL and some of the physical activity he had, from training, to getting into trouble in bar fights.He finally met Taya, his future wife and we learn about their courtship and marriage.As a SEAL, Chris doesn't disclose the names of his fellow SEAL's for fear that someone might want to cause them harm. We do learn of a number of his friends in the SEALS who were killed in action or died from their wounds at a later time. In these moments Chris's love for his fellow SEALS is easily seen and his description of a seal from his sister platoon, Mike Monsoon's death in battle and the manner in which he saved the lives of others resulting in him being awarded the Medal of Honor was touching.Another aspect of the autobiography that added to our understanding of this American Hero was reading about how events affected Taya. There is a very high divorce rate in the SEALS and it is easy to understand why. Even when Chris was back in the States, he was often going for more training and carousing. He tells of a time that he was supposed to be home for his daughter's birthday and couldn't make it because he was in jail from a fight.To understand the mind of a hero, this book was helpful. At times, I felt he could have been more personal. In his actions with his family, he never mentions his children's first names, even when worried that his little daughter might have had leukemia, she is always referred to as 'my daughter.'There were excellent action descriptions of Chris in action in Iraq and the reader is given a glimpse of the difficulties that Chris and other Americans faced. For many of the Iraqis and members of terror groups like al-Qaeda, their goal was to kill Americans. We might never realize how lucky we were to have heroes like Chris taking the attitude to prevent the killing of Americans and to kill the enemy first.”Michael A. Draper,
  • (5/5)
    I saw the author on Conan promoting his book. I knew I had to get this book instantly. A portion of this book goes to 2 friends who were killed and injured in war. That there should just be enough.

    What is unique about this book is how it flip flops. You get his side. Then his wife's side. You learn how the military presses, trains, then expects our soldiers to be.

    This book will bring tears to your eyes. My heart hurt for those who died, injured and list. It was an excellent read!
  • (2/5)
    It was very hard to read this book because it was not very well written. A lot of times, the author got so bogged down in the minutia of detail that it made the battle scenes seem boring (when I'm sure that they were anything but). I don't think Kyle should have written the book at all but he could have at least hired better writers to tell the story.

    I don't think i would have much liked to meet Chris Kyle. We have different beliefs about the military and different values all together. I'm sure that one of us would have pissed the other off. On a side note, it would have been better for the audio book to have had a female narrate the many interjections of Kyle's wife.
  • (5/5)
    American Sniper is about Chris Kyle, a Navy SEAL, who was the most deadly sniper in Iraq. He tells of his childhood, his growing love for guns, and his desire to serve in the military. His time in BUD/S, the hardships he endured as a soldier in Iraq, and the hardships he endured as a man at home in the States are also recounted. How he met his wife, Taya, and how the “rough spots” in their relationship strengthened their marriage are shared as well. He tells of the impact war had on him, physically and psychologically. He loved what he did, but eventually made changes in his life for his wife and kids, but he still did some service for his fellow soldiers. He and some friends created Craft International to help train Special Forces units and police units. Chris was murdered at a gun range last year.Chris lived a warrior’s life and loved what he did, watching his buddies’ backs and killing insurgents to save countless lives. I’d like to thank Chris for his service and his sacrifice. I’d like to also thank his wife Taya for her fortitude and support for Chris. I’m glad you two lived as happily as any couple can in this world. My prayers are with you and your kids. May God, in all His wisdom and mercy, walk you through the tough times and joyous times for the rest of your life and bless you always. God bless you too, Chris and thanks again. (Salute)!
  • (4/5)
    American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History
    Since the movie got so much attention and I was hearing how "every American should see it," yet how Kyle exaggerated various stories, how it portrayed the Iraq war in too nice a light, yet how it was helpful in shedding light on PTSD. Both praised and cursed, I thought I'd read the book for myself.

    First of all, it's a pretty tame book-- perhaps even boring for a war autobiography. Kyle notes that he didn't get his 160 kills mostly by his skill, but rather by opportunities (staying alive, re-upping, and seeing plenty of targets in Iraq) and luck (being at the right place at the right time). Lone Survivor is a more interesting/intense book if are looking for adrenaline and close calls. By the end of this book, killing becomes "no big deal," and what was probably harrowing and dangerous seems pretty mundane and routine. You probably need a movie theater to make it better.

    I think the endearing aspect is that Taya Kyle writes parts of it, describing what a jerk Kyle was, how it was difficult to be married, the changes she saw in him after his deployments, and her love for him growing as he finally decided to put his family first and not re-enlist. Most books of this nature don't have the spouse's perspective, so that made it interesting. At the Oscar's last week, Taya is quoted:
    "It's not just our story; it's every veteran's story," she said. "People have been relating to it so much, as well as healing. We're hearing stories of couples who were in combat 30 and 40 years ago, who are walking away [from the film], opening a dialogue they haven't been able to open before. So, I think it's just an honor to be able to help in some way, and have it be more than just our story.""

    The book begins similarly to Lone Survivor because, like Marcus Luttrell (who Kyle later befriends), Chris Kyle was raised a Texas patriotic country boy who can simultaneously profess love for Jesus while cursing like a sailor. He was an effective cattle ranch hand and college dropout. He was initially denied Navy entry due to screws in his arm from a rodeo injury. After the Navy called him back, a recruiter lied to him to forfeit his signing bonus saying that he had to do it if he wanted to make the SEALs.

    His Hell Week and BUDs training read a lot like every other such story I've read. He broke foot in BUDs (Luttrell broke his arm in his story). He's disappointed not to see combat in Afghanistan after 9/11, but he does engage in anti-piracy activity and his platoon is called up a year later to fight in Iraq. His initial deployment seemed unremarkable, Taya notes that he returns with symptoms of PTSD. He appreciates the American well-wishers but remembers the protestors most of all, and bitterly. He makes a good point that people shouldn't protest soldiers sent to fight the battles that elected officials vote for-- protest Congress instead.

    He eventually enrolls in sniper school, but graduates about the middle of his class. He details the work he did with Polish special forces in Iraq, speaking highly of them. During the insurgency, he notes Iraqi insurgents of different stripes-- nationalists, Baathists, Al Qaeda-affiliated Islamists. He notes that they had evidence many were on drugs to "boost their courage."

    Repeatedly, Kyle puts country ahead of family as in "God, country, family." His wife continuously does not want him to redeploy, but he can't not. So long as he's healthy and his country is at war (which is now perpetually), he feels he has to go serve. It takes him over 10 years in the service to get over this. He does multiple tours before suffering any casualties among his close friends. He loses two friends close together, and it affects him deeply.

    There is not a whole lot related to leadership or management in this book. One good quote: "I had a lot of good commanders. The great ones were humble."
    He notes the tediousness of strict adherence to Rules of Engagement. How every kill in Ramadi (and he had a lot) required filling out a detailed after-action report along with other reports to confirm that the killing was justified. On one occasion an Iraqi family of a dead insurgent protested that her husbands had been carrying a Koran rather than a rifle, which gets investigated. Kyle is not complimentary of Iraqi army, writing that it was a mistake to put an Iraqi face on the war and to train them to take over in the middle of insurgency.

    He gets arrested on one homestay, a bar fight with "scruff face" who Kyle later claimed was Jesse Ventura, who is now suing Kyle's estate for $1.7 million. (Dude, just say "it couldn't have been me" and move on. The damage to your reputation is greater from the lawsuit than from Kyle's potentially mistaken claim.) Eventually, he decides he needs to be a husband and a father, that he's not irreplaceable to his family like a soldier is with a new recruit. It took him a long time to get over SEAL life and guilt over getting out, but he gets there.

    In the end, he helped start a company to train snipers, does charity work for wounded warriors, and finds a new identity apart from the old. It is a shame that he was killed by someone he was trying to help.
  • (3/5)
    An interesting, readable account of war, the best American sniper in history and the effects that this all had on him and his family. Obviously his tragic death adds poignancy to the story but it does involve the reader, well and quickly. Worth looking apbut not as good in my eyes, as Marcus Luttrells Lone Survivior.
  • (3/5)
    Straight forward and honest reflection of Chris Kyle's time as a SEAL.
  • (3/5)
    First background as why to why I read this book.A while ago I watched the movie Shooter starring Mark Wahlberg who is a retired and reclusive ex-sniper. Decent and enjoyable movie. A year a so ago when my wife Heather was out I was flippin' channels and enjoined the movie again part way through. Still enjoyed it. Watching the credits I noticed it was based on the book "Point of Impact" - the first of a series about the ex-sniper Bob lee Swagger. Superb book. Apart from being a wonderful and well crafted conspiracy thriller I really enjoyed the technical parts about the science and technique of sniping. So when the movie "American Sniper" came out I watched it. I was disappointed. So I read the book and in summary, disappointed.While the movie differs from the book in some small but annoying details it has been criticized as pro-war, pro Iraq, distasteful ("savages" etc.) and these traits are consistent with the book. The book has also been criticized as "simply written". The last point is arrogant . You have to be impressed by anyone who can write a 448 page book. At least I am. Simply written - for sure and accordingly a very fast read. Pro war - not a chance. No one would be convinced to serve in the military after reading this book! Chris Kyle's priorities were God, country, family - not mine - but they're his and it didn't upset me. One doesn't need to believe in a book to read it.As a chronicle of one man's personal passage through Iraq it does a good job. Where I was really disappointed is that it isn't about sniping! There's about a page talking about the equipment, probably about the same on techniques. I find the science and process of sniping fascinating and this was a big hole for me. You might be different of course.
  • (5/5)
    Chris Kyle, with 160 kills, was the highest scoring sniper in American history. Here he tells his story in anecdotal form of four tours in Iraq over 10 years before stepping down. He tells of his love of combat, his determination to serve his country, to die for others if need be, and of his various experiences. It's not a story for kumbaya, let's-give-peace-a-chance types...Kyle is a SEAL and SEALs do violence to America's enemies. Kyle had had no interest in the Iraqis, but owed allegiance only to his mates and his country. Kyle was murdered by an ex-soldier suffering from PTSD. Clint Eastwood loosely based a hit movie on the book. The popularity of the book has attracted much attention...most of it seems to hold up to scrutiny with the possible brief run-in with Jesse Ventura who successfully sued Kyle's widow for defamation over a two-page passage.
  • (3/5)
    Disturbing in every aspect, I found myself horrified that ours is a world that so greatly needs the talents, and expertise of men and women like Chris Kyle. At the same time I gained a new appreciation for how fortunate we are to have men and women like Chris Kyle serving as protectors of our freedom, and greater clarity into the sacrifices made in order to serve, not only by them, but also by their families and all who love and care for them.
  • (4/5)
    After reading American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History, there’s no doubt in my mind that former U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle is patriot.
    Beyond that, though, my feelings about the former soldier are less clear. To hear Kyle tell it in his memoir, he has all the ingredients of a patriotic American: love for country, God and family—and probably in that order, too. But the more I read Kyle’s story, the more complex he becomes.
    Reading American Sniper, it’s obvious why Hollywood was able to make the memoir into a blockbuster movie. In addition to being the most effective sniper in US military history, Kyle has a talent for making already exciting stories about his time on the battlefield even more gripping. Kyle fought in some of the deadliest battles of the war in Iraq, from Fallujah to Ramadi. If even half of the stories he tells actually happened, he’s already done more than any big screen action hero can pretend to do.
    Kyle has a combination of skills, temperament, and character that made him deadly to his enemies, but also left me equivocal about the impact of war on American soldiers.
    Even as a fabulist, Kyle’s story as a soldier is a fascinating perspective from the front lines of American foreign policy. Further, because so many have seen the movie based on his book, his memoir could have significant impact on how Americans view the war in Iraq, for better or for worse. It’s that impact that has elicited response from across the celebrity spectrum, both in support and opposition to the movie.
    As another soldier wrote, though, Kyle’s perspective of the war in Iraq is just that: a perspective. It isn’t a definitive analysis of the war, why we went, and whether we should have been there. It’s one man’s experience in war-time.
    That said, the perspective is valuable and with such a small percentage of Americans signing up to serve in uniform, it’s a perspective that the rest of voting America might consider.
    Throughout American Sniper, Kyle seems to struggle with polar aspects of his nature. On one hand, he is driven by a need to be heroic, acting on a sense of invincibility and taking a devil-may-care approach to danger. On the other hand, he truly believes that his cause is just, wants to protect his fellow soldiers, and return home to be a considerate father.
    It was a struggle that his baser instincts seemed all too often to win.
    Taya, Kyle’s wife, whose commentary is interspersed throughout American Sniper, tells Kyle that if he reenlists, he would be choosing the SEAL lifestyle over her and their family. Kyle acknowledges it. And then chooses the war and his fellow soldiers, anyway, heading back to Iraq to fight in Ramadi.
    Returning home after his deployments was a trial and a hell for those around him, as well as for Kyle, too. And yet, Kyle says, multiple times, that he liked being a sniper and he liked killing the enemy. He considered them to be savages.
    Killing a man is not, and should not be, an easy thing, and Kyle’s story demonstrates in high relief the conditioning through which soldiers must pass effective warriors. It changes them and the experience of becoming effective killers, necessary for war, continues to impact them even when they return home.
    I’ve never served in the armed forces, but if I ever did, I hope the soldier fighting next to me is as effective as Kyle. Not only did he cover fellow soldiers under fire, he carried them out, too, protected them, led them, and brought them to safety.
    But if the effects of war on the people who must fight it have ever been unclear, American Sniper paints a disturbing picture. The war is hard on Kyle, physically and psychologically, as well as on his family. His body gradually breaks down over four tours of duty. At home between deployments he struggled with road rage and night terrors. After he retired from the service, Kyle sank into depression, alcohol, and pain.
    Multiply that by every veteran who was in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. Relatively speaking, Kyle might be considered lucky. Rather than succumb to the death spiral of alcohol and depression, a near-death car accident leaves Kyle shaken and resolved to change. He decides to give back and starts an organization to help vets recover from PTSD. Ironically, it was in this cause that Kyle died, shot to death by a veteran suffering from PTSD.
    From Seth Rogan to Bill O’Reilly, Michael Moore to Sarah Palin, it seems like everyone has an opinion on Kyle. To some he is a hero; to others, he is a cold-blooded killer.
    The truth is likely somewhere in the middle. But that’s the nature of war, isn’t it? It’s not always clear-cut, and the demands we make on our men and women to kill or be killed changes them forever. If we’re going to support our troops, adjust our thinking about war, then understanding Kyle’s experience, as well as the experiences of so many others that serve, American Sniper is a helpful perspective.
  • (5/5)
    I appreciate a guy who gets straight to the point and Kyle's writing is as straightforward as his sniper shots.
  • (4/5)
    After having watched the film, I wanted to hear about Chris Kyle's experiences in his own words.This book offers a pretty good idea of the hell soldiers must go through first to become SEALs, then to actually be in war. Throughout the book, Kyle's wife, Taya, includes her own perspective on various deployments and issues at home. I thought this was a nice change of pace and certainly reminded me of the sacrifices spouses and their extended families make while their soldier is at war.I very much support our Armed Forces and am politically conservative. Still, it was a little uncomfortable reading Kyle's frequent pronouncement that he liked killing. Understand, I have no sympathy for terrorists and their ilk, but it was still a little uncomfortable for me to read this. At the same time, I fully understand that we need people with mindsets like this in our military. Fact is: they're constantly in a kill-or-be-killed environment. I'd much rather it be our enemies than our own soldiers.Kyle did a pretty decent job of explaining various military acronyms and jargon, although some of the stories were unnecessary in terms of pacing. It's also not political in nature (he never mentions any politicians by name) but clearly he was irritated about some of the policies that were put in place--he just wanted (and to some degree, needed) the freedom to do the job he was sent there to do.If you enjoyed the film, you'll enjoy the book. You certainly get to know Kyle far better here than from the film.
  • (3/5)
    This book is about a sniper in the US Navy Seals. His name is Kyle and after he finished training he was stationed in colorado. In operation Iraq freedom he became a gunner in forward-deployed SEAL scout mission. His longest shot was 2100 yards and had killed a guy with a rocket launcher assulting a convoy.I like this book because it tells about in the military and being a sniper in iraq.
  • (2/5)
    The only really positive thing about this book is that it manages to transmit honesty, I seriously doubt the author held anything back (except what the DoD ordered him to), and humbleness. On the other hand his writing its pretty plain and so are his descriptions of the combats he was involved in. I can't understand all the hype about this book.
  • (5/5)
    Everyone should read this book!. It will make you realize how a country can invade countries with "preemptive" attacks and commit atrocities against others who are not "like us"; it shows why there will always be plenty of volunteers to perpetrate any kind of action against others. It is a sad sad book.
  • (2/5)
    A great American hero, but a fairly dull book as military biographies go. Bummer.
  • (5/5)
    American Sniper is a gutrenthcing, hard-hitting story of one man who had a tough but I feel a personally rewarding journey through the wars in Iraq/Afghanistan. I feel deep inside honored and proud of Chris Kyle defending not only Americans in Iraq and war zones, but any other military members as well. When Chris contemplated a second tour and re-enlisting for another 4-5 years of putting his country first, his wife felt a loss and anger towards her husband for not putting his wife and family first. Chris Kyle will always have my respect and admiration for helping to protect the ideas and values that make our country great. While some can argue his motives for leaving a wife and child for another tour has not feeling Chris Kyle felt strongly that in his training to be a warrior for our country he was being with his wife and family. It’s sad to know that he’s not with us and didn’t fall in battle for his country. This book is a great read and I recommend it strongly.
  • (3/5)
    Mixed feelings... read for an office book discussion. Would I have picked it up otherwise? No. Am I glad I read it? It was worth reading.

    I liked the book. I can think of readers who would also enjoy it. Possibly because I knew this was memoir and not fictional, I was able to separate myself from the narrative and Kyle's personality. I could look at the stories he told without becoming emotionally invested in them. Perhaps the most illuminating part of this book were the sections that recalled Kyle's difficulty in balancing his "work" life and his family life. His wife's contributions were very helpful in portraying the difficulties of military family life.

    Although the narrative structure is Jim DeFelice's responsibility, this book still read less like narrative non-fiction or even a smooth flowing memoir, and more like a combat diary full of "tales/recollections from the front".

    The pacing was fast. The language/style was conversational and very blunt. Kyle is both confident and self-effacing and he states his goal was to point out all of the soldiers that work together to fight. He doesn't deny his accomplishments, but he doesn't glorify them more than as work that needed to be done--and, luckily, work that he enjoyed.

    Tone was relentless, grim at times, humorous at other times, earnest. The book is "about being a man..." and it is certainly full of testosterone.

    I found plenty of book review/blog posts from conservative writers who enjoyed the book and did the patriotic rah-rah, but could find no liberal writers who reviewed the book. Interesting...
  • (2/5)
    This book is the autobiography of Navy Seal Chris Kyle. I became interested in this book after listening to an interview with him on the radio. On the radio, he sounded humble and said this book was not about his many kills but the impact that the military has on family. But, I found it to be the exact opposite. In his book, he spoke about the many kills during his career and seem to be bragging. He spoke very little about his family and made it very clear that military came before his family. I do believe that Mr. Kyle is a great hero in the war but it wasn't book he betrayed it to be in his interview.
  • (2/5)
    Here is as close to a review of this book as I can get. The following is a conversation I had with a man at work (I work at a library):man: “would you recommend this book?”me (in my head): “yes if you want to feel inadequate and mad and like having a panic attack”me (in my head also): “I don’t really need to read a book about that. I’m 25 in 2012. and I like men. The Beast has been oozing its goo all over them in every conceivable situation for almost my entire life. I don’t need to read about how fucking fun* killing is.”me (with my mouth): “if you like that type** this one has everything you’re looking for”————————————*fun and also causing of alky domestic violence and generalized feelings and behaviors of worthlessness**Chris Kyle literally ponders whether “country or family comes second, after God”
  • (4/5)
    Jarring tale of the life and times of U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle, of his military work, his relationships with his wife, family, and brothers in arms. It is the story of his time spent fighting on the front lines in Iraq, and what he had to do to get there. Riveting, disquieting, and heart wrenching. The language used is like talking to a buddy at the bar, and makes it all the more engrossing, because it is real. A must read.
  • (4/5)
    Chris Kyle is an American Hero and for that I thank him. I enjoyed his book and the no bullshit Texas style in which he delivers his stories. He shares a perfect level of detail. He dumbed down some of the technical aspects of his weapons, armor and tactics so they could even be understood by a tenderfoot like me. He doesn't get too political, but does share many of the frustrations of working for people who don't share his rough and tumble approach to getting the bad guys.
  • (3/5)
    He is the deadliest American sniper ever, called “the devil” by the enemies he hunted and “the legend” by his Navy SEAL brothers . . .From 1999 to 2009, U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle recorded the most career sniper kills in United States military history. The Pentagon has officially confirmed more than 150 of Kyles kills (the previous American record was 109), but it has declined to verify the astonishing total number for this book. Iraqi insurgents feared Kyle so much they named him al-Shaitan (“the devil”) and placed a bounty on his head. Kyle earned legendary status among his fellow SEALs, Marines, and U.S. Army soldiers, whom he protected with deadly accuracy from rooftops and stealth positions. Gripping and unforgettable, Kyle’s masterful account of his extraordinary battlefield experiences ranks as one of the great war memoirs of all time.American Sniper: The Autobiography of The Most Lethal Sniper in US Military History by Chris KyleI received this book for my review only with no monetary interest provided by William Morrow, a division of Harper Collins Publishers for my written expressed review.American Sniper is one story of just one man who had an incredible journey during the war in Iraq/Afghanistan. While I am so honored and proud of Chris Kyle defending not only Americans in Iraq and the surrounding areas, but other military members as well. I can’t help but read between the pages to see see his wife struggling to raise their first child by herself. With Chris contemplating a second tour and re-enlisting for another 4-5 years of being deployed back to Iraq, his Wife is left with a feeling of loss and anger towards her husband for not putting his wife and family first. Chris has done some amazing things by being a SEAL! Things that many of us Americans could not even fathom having to deal with. Chris has my utmost respect and admiration for helping to protect the American ideals that make our country great. What I don’t particularly like is how he put his country over his wife and children when coming up on his 2nd tour. With a wife and child at home and another on the way, he decides to re-enlist for another dangerous deployment that could end his life and leave his wife without a husband and his children without a father.I have to take the side of his wife after his first tour that he should not have re-enlisted to be with his wife and family. He served his country with honor and saved many lives, while at the same time killing so many terrorists that threatened any type of life in Iraq. After his first tour however, he was plagued by thoughts of not being their for his fellow soldiers that he forgot the most important rule in life. To be a loving father and husband, for that is what is truly will be remembered by the ones you love and whom you will depend on in life. Yes he has many memories as a sniper and has remained very close to other SEAL’s throughout his life, but it is his wife and children that will make him the man that he is.I would rate this book a 3 out of 5 stars. I would rate this book higher, but I felt that his patriotism truly leads his life over his family. God, family, country is how it should be. Thank you Chris Kyle for your service and your pride for America. Now take the time to have a happy and fulfilling relationship with your wife and children. God Bless you!
  • (5/5)
    What a remarkable story of heroism, patriotism, and self-sacrifice by an even more remarkable American, Chris Kyle. A Navy SEAL and highly trained sniper, Kyle is even more remarkable in his straightforward admittance that his accomplishments alone are not to be lauded, but the accomplishments and sacrifices of his fellow military men who sacrificed their vision, limbs, and some ultimately their lives in fighting for the freedoms that we often take for granted, yet hold so dear. It may not be much, but here is one American that is forever grateful and thankful to Chris Kyle and ALL of our brave men and women fighting for our country.Kyle joins the ranks of such American sniper greats as Carlos Hathcock 93 confirmed kills during the Vietnam War, and whose sniper exploits were so eloquently related to the reader in these two books written by Charles Henderson; Marine Sniper: 93 Confirmed Kills and Silent Warrior: The Marine Sniper's Story Vietnam Continues, as well as, other sniper greats such as; Chuck Mawhinney a U.S. Marine with 103 confirmed kills during the Vietnam War and Adelbert Waldron the previous U.S. Military record holder with 109 confirmed kills.One particular aspect that I liked about how this book was written was the occasional viewpoint expressed by Kyle's lovely wife, Taya. Although both she and Kyle allude to problems both faced concerning each other and his absence during his military service, one can't help but realize what a truly remarkable women Taya is and Chris is a damn lucky man to have her. I am quite sure that God has and will continue to smile upon the both of them.I really liked Kyle's no apologetic statement that he enjoyed his job and took great pride in saving the lives of his fellow soldiers as they fought against the evils that they found in Iraq. Kyle doesn't go into a lot of gruesome detail concerning that subject but he makes it painfully clear that unless you have actually been there and seen the evil that hasn't been diluted by politicians and the media, then you really have no idea what it is like. I would wholeheartedly agree!Kyle talks about not only his involvement as a Navy SEAL sniper in Iraq, but also his working relationship with other branches of the military. Some real insightful stuff!Kyle not only gives you a glimpse into the world he and his fellow SEAL's lived during the Iraq War, but also the difficulties he faced when he came home in between tours and for good upon his retirement from the Navy. And although there were difficulties, he also shares some very humorous moments as well. I especially liked the story about the "burglar" breaking into his home while he was on leave and while he was still in bed after his wife left for work. I was laughing so hard that I couldn't stop for several minutes. As a matter of fact I am laughing real hard right now as I type this review. Sorry Chris, I am laughing at you as well as with you on this one. Ha Ha HaI am not one for posting a lot of spoilers when I do my reviews, but I do have to say that one only needs read a few pages to realize that not only is Chris Kyle one of the finest soldiers the United States of America has every produced, but he is also, and perhaps more importantly, one helluva human being and a truly great American. God Bless!I highly recommend this book to every American as a very inspirational read as well as a biography of one extraordinary human being.Shawn KovacichMartial Artist/Krav Maga InstructorNRA Firearms InstructorAuthor and Creator of numerous books and DVD's.