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El atraco

El atraco

Escrito por Daniel Silva


El atraco

Escrito por Daniel Silva

valoraciones:
4/5 (22 valoraciones)
Longitud:
14 horas
Publicado:
May 17, 2016
ISBN:
9780718090074
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Gabriel Allon, restaurador de arte y ocasional espía, está en búsqueda de una obra maestra de Caravaggio que ha sido robada, en el relato lleno de acción e intriga internacional del autor #1 best seller del New York Times Daniel Silva. A veces la mejor manera de encontrar una obra maestra robada es robar otra... Novelista maestro Daniel Silva ha entusiasmado lectores con dieciséis apasionantes y cautivadoras novelas espías con un variado elenco de personajes convincentes e ingeniosos que las ha llevado a todo el mundo —desde Estados Unidos a Europa, Rusia al Oriente Medio. Su brillante creación, Gabriel Allon —restaurador de arte, asesino, espía— se ha unido al firmamento de los grandes agentes secretos ficticios, entre ellos, George Smiley, Jack Ryan, Jason Bourne, y Simon Templar. Tras el éxito de su éxito The English Girl, Daniel Silva vuelve con otra poderosa novela que exhibe su espectacular habilidad y brillante imaginación, y asegura ser de lectura obligada tanto para su multitud de fans y la creciente legión de convertidos.
Publicado:
May 17, 2016
ISBN:
9780718090074
Formato:
Audiolibro

Sobre el autor

Daniel Silva is the award-winning, No.1 New York Times bestselling author of twenty novels, including The Unlikely Spy, The Confessor, A Death in Vienna, The Messenger, Moscow Rules, The Rembrandt Affair, The English Girl and The Black Widow. His books are published in more than thirty countries and are best sellers around the world. He lives in Florida with his wife, CNN special correspondent Jamie Gangel, and their two children, Lily and Nicholas.


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4.0
22 valoraciones / 31 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    I really enjoy Silva's Gabriel Allon stories, and this was no exception.
  • (5/5)
    This was like the greatest hits of Gabriel Allon - Silva brought back the best of the best secondary characters from previous novels: Christopher Keller, Don Orsati, the goat (!), Maurice Durand, Julian Isherwood, Christoph Bittel, and Viktor Orlov, in addition to the brilliant cast of King Saul Boulevard. He worked them all together beautifully into a taut international thriller that had me on the edge of my seat. Perfection.
  • (3/5)
    I purchased this book with the intent of enjoying an easy, mindless, and entertaining read. After a brief hiatus from reading, I was simply looking for a book that was easy to follow and had a simple structure. The Heist was exactly what I was looking for. The Heist was my first exposure to Daniel Silva's series featuring Gabriel Allon as spymaster extraordinaire. I am giving the book 3 stars simply because it is not my preferred type of fiction and is just too plain. There are no underlying themes or artistic colorations of any kind. On the other hand, given the genre this book is in, I am quite sure it is a 5 star book all the way.Silva does a great job of relating current events with the fictional characters and places in this book. The leadership in Syria is, in fact, very disturbing and The Heist portrays this country and its people very soberly and realistic. Gabriel Allon is a Jew working for the Israeli intelligence service. The persecution of Jews is a common theme throughout the book.It is difficult to give an academic, in-depth review of a book of this type. It is what is it is - simple entertainment with the help of some major international current events as a backdrop. I doubt I will read another one of Silva's books unless I simply want to read another mindless piece of entertainment some day. I am sure that day will come but, until then, I think I will stick to books that inspire and fulfill me in some way.
  • (4/5)
    The Gabriel Allon series is one of my personal favorites. This book continues his story and involves another international art theft and murder. I found that I enjoyed this book less than previous in the series because it felt a bit stale. It seemed that almost every character Allon had met in previous books made a return to play a minor role in this story. Many of them weren't necessary, and I almost feel as if the author was pandering to his audience. The story itself dragged for much of the book, but the last 100 pages had its usual action and unexpected resolutions. The personal story of Allon moved along and was satisfying. I think I would have given this three stars as a stand alone novel, but bumped it to four because of how much I enjoy the series.
  • (4/5)
    An enjoyable Gabriel Allon book. Art theft and forgery mixed with international finance.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoy this series which stars Gabriel Allon, an Israeli spy and art restorer. You always learn something about painting and art restoration and there is always an excellent mystery to boot.In this installment Gabriel is working in Venice restoring a picture in a church when he is asked to get involved in clearing an old friend of a murder charge. The murder victim was a former British spy and art dealer was suspected of dealing in stolen art and, in particular, Caravaggio's Nativity with St. Francis and St. Lawrence. In clearing his friend's name Allon discovers works of art that have been covered over by new paintings but not the Caravaggio. To flush out the Caravaggio painting Allon cooks up a scheme to steal another painting (Allon carefully says borrow, not steal) and offer it to the underground market. It appears that the Syrian dictator is involved so Allon then decides to steal the money stashed away in foreign banks by the Syrians. So there are a number of heists involved in this plot and I guess Silva invites us to take our pick as to which one the title refers.Fast-paced and set in multiple locales from Tel Aviv to London, you are not going to be bored listening or reading to this book. I listened to it narrated by George Guidall and enjoyed it hugely.
  • (5/5)
    This series remains compelling and fun. It's the Super Jews vs. evil. In this case, the bad guys are Sryian's loyal to Assad, and the Syrian government thugs are the reincarnation of Nazi evil. In this work, as in previous titles, Israel, via the super-hero main character, makes a preemptive attack. The curve ball here is that in so doing he compromises one of his team who falls into the bad guys hands, and Israel must undo the damage it caused to get the hostage back. There's no perception that an unprovoked preemptive attack might be evil in itself and there's certainly no criticism of Israeli occupation politics or its wars in Gaza. Like in an old-fashioned cowboy movie, the Israelis always wear the white hats and the villains the black hats. The Israeli intelligence community can so anything. Silva's big on establishing parity with other intelligence agencies; in this work, for example, he intersects with the Italians, Swiss, and Great Britain, and the hero is treated as one of the better players on the field. He's supported by the same crew as in the previous books (as well as reveiving aid from the demi-monde including a Corsican assassin, and a French art thief, a forger and others), and don't ever bet against the good guys. But the hero also has this other avocation of restoring old-master art. This allows art history to permeate the stories providing a "good" side to human behavior to match the torture and murder. James Bond is a similar character to the hero, as is Jack Reacher and the Mission Impossible team. It's all very plot driven and as easy to get down as a great beer on a hot day. But there is no suspension of disbelief as there's never any doubt as to who will ultimately win and save the world from yet another sociopath. This is prime beach reading--even in the dead of winter.
  • (4/5)
    Daniel Silva never disappoints. Intricate plots, great descriptions of locales, an art history lesson and an up to date recounting of politics.
  • (4/5)
    Very enjoyable!
  • (3/5)
    Daniel Silva is an excellent writer. While the first chapter of The Heist was a bit difficult to settle into, by chapter 3, I was very much enjoying the story and Daniel Silva's easy pace. The characters are fun and the story enjoyable to watch unfold.I must also respect Silva's awareness of the atrocities being committed globally, and the compassionate way in which he approaches them.What I did not feel, however, was much anxiety over the character's well-being or safety, which I believe should be a part of any spy/conspiracy novel. Even lacking the "Thrill" factor, I enjoyed the book and would recommend it for a fun summer read.
  • (4/5)
    Loved the audio when there was dialogue and discussion of the actual movements as well as the action, but I, unfortunately, don't know enough history to make perfect sense of the more historical details in the book---definitely my fault, not the author's!
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed this book although not as much as the others in this series. Silva included a lot of history about the conflicts in the Middle East which was interesting but I would rather have had more story of Gabriel and his team at work in the field. It looks like the team will be retiring soon. I love the descriptions of the cities and the art restorations, and the interactions of the characters. Mr. SIlva excels at those. I look forward to the next book.
  • (4/5)
    Another excellent book in the series by Daniel Silva. I never tire of his primary character and cast of Israeli intelligence operatives. While Silva's style does not keep you guessing until the very end, he does have enough twists and turns to keep you unsure of the entire final outcome - Well Done !
  • (5/5)
    Gabriel Allon is once again drawn into helping solve an international theft of a famous painting and finds himself tracing billions of dollars being used to finance the brutal dictatorship of Syria. Not quite as gripping as previous Silva novels, but no less enjoyable or readable as the author has managed to weave a very interesting tale of international embezzlement along with Allon's pursuit of the stolen painting, which leads him to many other problems along the way. I would like to see more of Allon's character expanded in future novels with the upcoming birth of his children with Chiara, and how his family will tie in to his passion (restoring paintings), and his duty (chief of Israeli intelligence). I can see some tense times ahead for Allon as Silva continues to bring to life these wonderful characters.
  • (5/5)
    Ongoing series, #14, may be a transitional title in the series as characters age. There are some who claim redundancy in the titles but there are reasons for that. This title continues to use near history, socio-political / geopolitical events / conditions with art restoration thrown into the mix. I have no problem with character descriptions being repeated as everyone has not read the entire series. I like the characters and what they go through to achieve positive goals.
  • (5/5)
    Daniel Silva is my favorite author of this genre. His character Gabriel Allon is so unique, intense and unforgettable that you can not find anyone in Hollywood to do him justice if this story was made into film. I am just sorry it took me so long to find him.
  • (2/5)
    Long and convoluted tale, linking the theft of multiple paintings and massive funds controlled by the Syrian ruling family. Got to be very tedious at times, but I finished listening to it while on the road.
  • (5/5)
    Another excellent novel in the Gabriel Allon series by Daniel Silva. This one enlightens the reader on the situation with Syria and its ruling family. While looking for a stolen alter piece, Gabriel works to pull off a heist worth billions of dollars that belong to the ruler of Syria. Gabriel's wife, Chiarra, is still pregnant with his twins, and hopefully, the poor woman will finally give birth in the next book. Lots of good reading and perhaps not quite as much violence as usual. Highly recommended.
  • (5/5)
    Well, I'm sad because I've finished Silva's newest book and I don't know when there will another. The Heist has many of the same characters and intrigue as his earlier works and thus, is a bit predictable. But I don't care. Lovely, descriptive writing with none of the foulness in language or sexual nonsense the majority of today's authors feel necessary to include. I admire Silva greatly for that and wish it would rub off. If you're a great writer and come up with great plots like he does, it is not necessary.
  • (4/5)
    Great book. Hard to keep the intrigue going with the same set of characters. Very enjoyable read
  • (4/5)
    good story have not read any other book from this author. really enjoyed. the story just kept right on moving.
  • (5/5)
    Great! Gabriel's prepared to take over the Office. Opportunity for recovering stolen painting leads to a middle east connection of huge impact.
  • (4/5)
    I felt that this book was a very good addition to the Gabriel Allon books. I especially it when the emphasis is on art and not on violence. I have read them all and I am eager to see if the series will switch directions when Allon becomes the Director.
  • (4/5)
    This 14th book is a fun read--Gabriel is on his last caper before becoming the head of the Israeli Intelligence Agency. (I don't really believe that it will be his last, do you?) The first part of the book is rather boring and deals with art restoration. I began to wonder if it were an art book. Then, it picks up as the head of the Italian art police persuades our hero into looking for a rare painting stolen decades ago...author is still loping along. Then, the action gets a little better. When the "office" gets involved, then we're back into Silva's best. Gabriel masterminds a scheme to seize $8B stolen by the Syrian government. As in many other novels Gabriel has always time to visit his first wife and one wonders why? It's a book about spies, dictators, a little art, some current events and quite a bit of excitement. There are references to action from the first 13 books and I wish that I'd read them all before this one.
  • (4/5)
    Silva's Gabriel Allon books are easy reading, with lots of interesting spycraft along with, particularly in this case, some stuff about the world of Art.In this book, Allon is taking a break from his stressful life as a spy and assassin, caring for his new wife who is pregnant with his children. But his friend Julian Isherwood stumbles upon a gruesomely murdered ex-spy, and Allon is enlisted by the Italian art crime authorities to uncover the location of an important missing painting connected to the victim. This leads him to a Syrian banker who is laundering and hiding the money of the unnamed ruler of Syria (obviously Assad), and he launches an operation to take that money.As usual in this genre, it describes the frightening efficiency and competence of the Israeli security service. And of course things always have to go wrong in spite of well-laid plans.I've only read one other of these books; what I like about Silva is that endings are hard to predict- not because there are wild, unexpected twists, but because Silva is not dedicated to ensuring the reader a clean and happy ending. The other side is competent too, so it feels like victory is not assured.
  • (5/5)
    De mis preferidas en la saga del autor. Trama con muchos matices, giros y situaciones inesperadas. Un protagonista Gabriel Allon que muestra su lado humano y sensible, que tiene aciertos y desaciertos, y la genialidad de siempre junto a su equipo y agencias colegas. Muy recomendada.
  • (5/5)
    Brilliantly constructed and written as usual. For once, no heart dropping moment! Loved how Silva is writing Allon, and how he’s finally getting pulled into Israeli intelligence (a forever desire of Ari’s)
  • (4/5)
    The fourteenth book of the Daniel Allon series begins with a murder investigation surrounding a stolen painting and becomes a mission to hunt down the hidden assets of the Syrian president. Gabriel Allon displays his talents as an art restorer, investigator, and Israeli intelligence operative. The story begins when Gabriel attempts to save Julian Isherwood from jail by agreeing to recover the most famous missing painting in the world, Caravaggio’s Nativity. While on this search he recruits the help of a German naturalized citizen, Jihan Nawaz, whose family was the victim of a major massacre in her Syrian hometown. Numerous old favorites from prior series make an appearance here but the most compelling characters of the book are Gabriel and Jihan.

    Gabriel Allon has an incredibly complex personality, which makes him more empathetic, and believable. He sometimes makes mistakes and allows himself to be haunted by the loss of loved ones. One of the most poignant scenes in the book is when Gabriel visits his first wife, Leah, who was scarred emotionally and physically by a terrorist bombing where their son was killed. It is heart-breaking to see Leah’s struggles with psychotic depression and witness her as a prisoner to the past. Leah very rarely makes an appearance but when she does she can still pack quite a powerful punch for long time readers.

    As always I learned a lot about famous paintings and artists. I found myself googling a number of the paintings referenced and that seemed to add some extra enjoyment to the story for me. The plot line is action packed and filled with intrigue and suspense. Normally this would be a five star read for me but for the very first time I felt like I'd already read this story. It's hard to keep a character fresh after fourteen books and by the end of the book you realize there will soon be lots of changes in Gabriel's life that will potentially open up some great possibilities for future books. I'm still a fan and Silva can count on me to pre-order his next Gabriel Allon thriller.

  • (4/5)
    Gabriel has been collecting a large list of ‘friends’ whose sense of right and wrong and what laws to abide vary greatly. This time around he gets them all to help him pull off the worlds biggest heist. He started it all because he friend Isherwood happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.Julian Isherwood went to a villa in Italy to discuss the sale of some artwork and what he found was artwork of a different kind. The man he went to see had been beaten to death by professionals. This put Julian in a bad spot and it was used to get Gabriel to look into the matter. Apparently the dead man was a fence for priceless stolen paintings, and the rumors were he was selling a very sought after piece, which might have something to do with his demise. Someone has been buying up all the stolen artwork they can lay their hands on and this is a common way to for rich to hide money for safekeeping. Gabriel gets all the criminals he has had associations with together to put on a sting like none other. The first order of business is to try and identify this mysterious buyer. To do so, Gabriel needs a very tempting piece of artwork, and the easiest way to get to get a stolen painting to sell, is to steal one.While I like all of the Gabriel Allon books I have read, this is one I’ve enjoyed reading the most. I don’t mind the dark ones, with the gruesome details of death and torture, but this one proves Gabriel doesn’t need it. I do like how each book in the series targets people and places to showcase the terrible things governments and other groups do to people because they can. Silva is trying and I believe succeeding in bringing to light many atrocities that have and continue to happen around the globe.
  • (3/5)
    I've read all the Gabriel Allon books by former journalist Daniel Silva——my guilty pleasure——and this ranks in the middle of the pack. The novel has a lethargic start, the first 200 pages or so is the famous Israeli spy (now slated to become Chief of the Office) searching for a famous Italian painting, but not, at first, because there is much at stake other than the painting. However, when the stakes are raised (no spoilers here!) the novel takes off and dives right into the center of Middle East issues on the world stage today.In addition, and this is my quibble as a writer——get a better title. This title is used up, obvious, a title for even a lesser book, or maybe this is just that. Read for the last three-quarters of the novel. Enjoy the summer!--Caroline