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All Summer Long: A Novel

All Summer Long: A Novel


All Summer Long: A Novel

valoraciones:
4/5 (25 valoraciones)
Longitud:
10 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
May 31, 2016
ISBN:
9780062466662
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

Dorothea Benton Frank novels are filled with smart and witty fiction that every reader wants on their bookshelf: soulful, edgy stories about realistic characters familiar to us all that explore the most deeply felt moments of life with wry humor and heart.

All Summer Long follows one charming New York couple – prominent interior designer Olivia Ritchie and her husband Nicholas Seymour, an English professor and true southern gentleman. They are seemingly polar opposites, yet magnetically drawn together and in love for more than fourteen years.

As they prepare to relocate to Charleston, S.C., Olivia, the ultimate New Yorker, has reservations about the promise she made to retire in the Lowcountry, where Nick wants to return home and lead a more peaceful life. They are moving north to south, fast pace versus slow pace and downsizing. Nick is ecstatic. Olivia is not. She can’t let Nick know that their finances are not what he thought. Her client list is evaporating, their monetary reserves are dwindling and maybe that house she picked out on Sullivans Island needs too much work. Thank God, for her assistant, Roni Larini, her right (and sometimes left) hand.

As they find themselves pondering the next step of their lives, Olivia and Nick travel with her billionaire clients and their friends and are swept up into the world of the ultra-rich and explore the globe with a cast of zany eccentrics over one tumultuous, hot summer. All as Olivia grapples with what lies ahead for her and Nick.

This is a story of how plans evolve and lives change in unexpected ways, how even those who have everything are still looking for something more. Even the most successful people can often struggle to keep things together. All Summer Long asks the ultimate question: can money buy happiness? From Sullivans Island to Necker Island to Nantucket to the beaches of Southern Spain, we’ll come to recognize the many faces of true love, love that deepens and endures but only because one woman makes a tremendous leap of faith. And that leap changes everything.

Editorial:
Publicado:
May 31, 2016
ISBN:
9780062466662
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro

Sobre el autor

New York Times bestseller Dorothea Benton Frank was born and raised on Sullivans Island, South Carolina. Until her passing in 2019, Dorothea and her husband split their time between New Jersey and South Carolina. A contemporary voice of the South, Dorothea Benton Frank was beloved by fans and friends alike since her debut novel Sullivans Island. Readers from coast to coast fell for the quick wit and the signature humor that permeated her many bestselling novels.


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25 valoraciones / 22 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    I received this book through Goodreads free giveaway. It was an entertaining read, and kept my interest throughout. I have read other reviews about the characters on Goodreads but that is what made the book interesting and not just a sappy love story. It had some interesting twists. It definitely was worth reading and I thank goodreads giveaway for the opportunity.
  • (4/5)
    A new summer beach book from Dorothea Benton Frank. This title features interior designer Olivia Ritchie and her newly-retired English professor husband, Nicholas Seymour, who is a native of Charleston, SC. Nick extracted a promise from the much-younger Olivia that when he retired, they would relocate to Charleston. She bought a house and decorated it, but about the same time all of that began, her business in New York City started going down the tubes. By the time they make the move, there is only enough money left to survive for a few months. The rest of the book is spent with them jetting around the globe while Olivia courts rich clients as well as trying to solve some of there problems. Nothing too deep here, but it's a pleasant summer diversion.
  • (3/5)
    This was a little different than most of her work as the majority of the setting was in NYC and in glamorous locales. There was still a Southern flair to the novel however as Olivia, a New York interior designer, coped with moving to the Lowcountry. A nice book to read by the pool, like a crisp Rose wine you drink with your girlfriends.
  • (1/5)
    I have never seen such bad writing actually published. The "plot" never moved forward, there was so much conversation that was cloying and pointless. The main character's husband wiggled his eyebrows at her at least 3 times in 3 pages. It was unbelievable bad writing, and it actually had an "editor"!
  • (4/5)
    The story of a mature couple downsizing their lives and moving home to the Low Country. Along with these changes are the entertained lives of their very wealthy friends. As always Frank has some really unique characters.
  • (4/5)
    Light summer read about Olivia, an interior designer, and her older husband, Nick, who is readying to retire. The retirement includes moving home base from NYC to Sullivan's Island. Throw in a mix of wacky friends with their lifestyle change and you have an entertaining read.
  • (3/5)
    Olivia Richie is a successful interior designer living a lavish life with her husband in New York City. Her husband, Nicholas, is from the south, Charleston to be specific, and she has promised him that when the time comes they will retire there and simplify their lives. Well, that time has come and they are buying a fixer-upper on Sullivan's Island. Olivia is really nervous about this move though, because she isn't used to the slow pace of the lifestyle there; plus, what about her interior design company? Can she work from the beach? Will she lose clients? She should be thinking about retiring, but she is having some financial issues that she doesn't share with her husband. So, with the hope to drum up new clients, she and her husband go with her friend/client, Maritza, on a trip to Necker Island. Who can say no to a private island anyway? She also accompanies billionaire couple, Maritza and Bob, to other glamorous locations. Olivia comes to realize that all things that glitter aren't gold and money isn't everything. All Summer Long by Dorothea Benton Frank is pure summertime fun. This novel explores the lifestyles of the rich and is a perfect poolside indulgence. Olivia is an interesting character in All Summer Long. I couldn't necessarily relate to her, but I sympathized with her from time to time. I especially enjoyed her down-to-earth relationship with her husband, Nicholas. I liked his southern charm and his affinity for Charleston. Their relationship was probably the best part of the novel. Olivia's friendship with Maritza was also interesting. I obviously can't relate to the one percent at all, but I appreciated being transported into their world filled with private islands, butlers, caviar, yachts, and all things fabulous. But if you dig deeper, you will see that perhaps Maritza and Bob aren't exactly happy. There are rumors of his infidelity with the nanny and the fact that he is losing interest in Maritza, who is desperately trying to gain his attention. Olivia is thrown in the middle of this predicament as well as many others that arise when traveling together abroad along with their other rich friends. For example, there's a wedding aboard a yacht and it is pretty much a disaster. The drama, the fighting, the scandal...it's all there. It definitely kept me entertained in All Summer Long. However, I didn't feel for these characters like I did with Frank's previous novel. This was more of a "fun" read as opposed to one that might tug on my heartstrings. I mean these rich people behaved badly. I really didn't like any of the characters other than Olivia and Nicholas. They rest acted like they were not the set of the Real Housewives. Nonetheless, I suppose that makes for a fun summertime read, much like reading US Weekly and other gossip rags.So, if you like a glimpse into the lifestyles of the one-percent along with exotic locations in the Caribbean, Spain, and of course, Frank's beloved South, add All Summer Long to your beach bag this summer.
  • (4/5)
    Olivia is an interior designer in New York City. As a long time resident, this is the life that she knows and loves. When she married her husband Nicholas, a professor and historian, she promised that when he retired, they would relocate to Sullivan's Island near Charleston SC. That time has come and Olivia needs to make the move but the problem is that she has severe cash flow problems due to a down turn in her work and she hasn't shared that information with her husband. Add in some very rich and very crass people that they go on a yacht trip and you have an interesting look into the life of the rich and famous - and that life didn't look too great! The book is about the move and whether Olivia can make the transition and still keep her business and her husband happy. I am a long time fan of Dorothea Benton Frank and have read all of her books. She writes lovingly of the South Carolina low country and you feel that you are sitting on the beach when you read her descriptions. The only thing that I didn't like about her new book All Summer Long is that more of it took place in NYC and on a yacht than in SC so there was little time to spend in SC. As a long time reader, I would have preferred more time in SC and lots less in NYC. Despite that, I enjoyed this book and thank the author for my first glimpse of the beach (though a short glimpse) this reading season.(Thanks to LibraryThing for a copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review.)
  • (4/5)
    I am a huge fan of Dorothea Benton Frank's book. That being said, this one was a little disappointing. Don't get me wrong.... I liked it, I just didn't LOVE it. The main focus of the book was like lifestyles of the rich & famous. That made it hard for me to relate to any of the characters. The message was good though. You can always start over and change your life. It's never too late.
  • (4/5)
    Olivia, an interior designer, agreed to move to South Carolina when her husband Nick retired. However, she has not foreseen her attachment to New York or the financial strain this will involve. As she tries to keep up appearances for her wealthy clients she hides the truth about their finances from Nick. Over the course of a summer, they also take several trips with an eclectic group of the super-rich. But money cannot buy happiness, and there are lessons to be learned about love, especially when one of Olivia's friends and clients disappears.This story seemed to have a somewhat slow start, with little conflict in the beginning. The pace picked up as the characters became better developed, but I found it difficult to identify with some of the extravagance of the wealthy.
  • (3/5)
    Olivia Ritchie, interior designer, is moving with her retiring husband to Sullivan's Island. She's concerned about her business which is showing a loss for the first time. She has one main steady client who figures prominently in the book. I usually love Dorothea Benton Frank's books, but this one fell a bit flat for me. Too much time was spent outside Charleston and in the way too busy atmosphere of New York or the jet-setting crowd. There was too little interaction with the people on Sullivan's Island. I kept expecting her to meet some of the people from former novels, and it never happened. It did finally pick up in the last 150 pages or so. I'm used to the relaxed and kind manners of the native Charleston-area people rubbing off on the characters who move there from fast-paced locales. As long as the societal pace was fast, the book was not relaxing which is important to me in a summer read. The book wrapped up a little too neatly to be realistic. I received this book through LibraryThing Early Reviewers in exchange for an honest review.
  • (3/5)
    I struggled with the review on this book. While I didn't care for it, I acknowledge that it might be well-liked by some other reader. It isn't badly written and provides a peep into the lives of the very rich. That said, however, I would have stopped reading after Chapter Two, had the book not be an Early Reviewer book. The first two chapters were essentially a detailed inventory of the protagonist's belongings. Olivia is a talented interior designer who panders to the "1%" and is about to relocate with her professor husband from New York, which she loves, to South Carolina, which she is prepared to loathe. Most of the action in the novel takes place in two gatherings of Olivia's contacts/customers in luxurious settings where all the the players behave badly. And, I mean badly. The one accomplishment of this novel is that it portrays a group of people so crass, rude, crude and utterly unappealing, that the reader begins to sincerely hope that the ship will simply sink and take down everyone one board. Olivia herself is troubled by her dwindling income. Her worry, however, doesn't stop her from continuing to spend money like there were no restraints--a special kind of foolishness that belies a character one would expect to have a little sense. The story wends to a conclusion and then a false climax meant to alarm the reader. It did, until I realized that it was simply an example of the sort of writer's trick I roundly despise. And lastly, the author has a special affection for the word "Please." used as a derisive exclamation. She puts that word into the mouth of every character in the book over the age of four and in every chapter. After a bit, it had the effect of nails on blackboard. In general, the dialogue was unconvincing, particularly between Olivia and her husband. Descriptions in the book, which dealt with some of the most stunning landscape on earth, were generally flat and uninteresting. In general, not my cup of tea.
  • (2/5)
    I like reading. I like Charleston. I like reading books set in Charleston. So, Dotty Frank's All Summer Long should have been a walk in walk in Waterfront Park, Slam dunk at the Joe (and maybe TD Arena at CofC for the dunk), day at the beach (Folly, Sullivans, Isle of Palms, and heck, even Kiawah, Seabrook, or Edisto) for me. Right?Except it wasn't. The only things that engaged me in this book was the dedication to Pat at the beginning (assuming that Pat was Pat Conroy) and the memory of flying into Charleston from New York City, and reading Frank's description of the same flight path. But even then, I shuddered. "Scarlett's ringlets"? Even as a joke? Nevah. The characters felt dead to me, and even my beloved lowcountry failed to breathe a spark of life (or interest ) into the story.Dorthea Benton Frank's books tend to either be a hit or a miss for me, rarely lukewarm. But I keep reading them, because when the combo hits a homer into the marsh from The Joe, I wanna be there in my kayak to catch it. I am currently rethinking that plan. My apologies to the author and to her fans.Tags: 2016-read, an-author-i-read, give-me-my-time-back, read, thank-you-charleston-county-library, thought-i-was-gonna-like
  • (5/5)
    I just don't know how much more I can say about DBF's wonderful books, book after book after book. I am nothing but sad it's done for probably another long year! This one involved a couple traveling to some extravagant places around the world with friends and living in the Lowcountry and visiting Nantucket, both some of the most beautiful places in the world to live. This is what good fiction is all about, envisioning places we all hope to see someday but until we can she will help us go there in our minds. GOOD BOOK!!
  • (3/5)
    Three middle-aged men, friends since high school in Ohio, tour the country in an idyllic summer. Occasionally they are joined by women (not always the men's wives), which kind of ruins the bonding. Dripping with nostalgia.
  • (2/5)
    I found this book difficult to finish. Maybe if I was a male in my 40s I might have appreciated it more. But being a woman and married, I didn't really appreciate all of the infidelity. This book seemed to be more about self indulgence than friendship.
  • (4/5)
    A bittersweet road-trip book about three fortyish men taking a summer off to spend time together like they did as kids. They each discover things about themselves, and each other, and ultimately have to make some choices about their lives after the summer ends. An interesting concept, I almost wish I could just take off with friends for three months to drive around and see the sights.
  • (4/5)
    Not as much takes place on Sullivan's Island as I would have liked, but I like her characters and her stories - and there was just a TINY amount of history - actually about Nantucket... but all in all an enjoyable summer read.
  • (4/5)
    A nice beach read.
  • (5/5)
    All Summer Long, the attest by Dorthea Benton Frank, is a pretty good book which can enjoyably help many a romance reader get through a long summer day. Olivia is an interior decorator, with a history of decorating many rich benefactors’ houses. Her husband, Nick, is a professor and historian. Both complement each other well. It is also easy to see their enduring love for each other. They have reached the stage where Nick know what Olivia is thinking and vice versa, while each is ready and able to complete the other’s sentence or thought, etc. In short, they are an older couple who have made it through many years and stumble of marriage and are now in it for the long haul, though, in the book, Nick is a bit older than Olivia. They are in a nice, easy-going marriage, heading into their older years. Olivia has promised Nick she will relocate to Sullivans Island, just outside Charleston, SC, when he retires, though it means moving out of their NY house—and away from all of Olivia’s trusted, well-heeled clients and former clients. Thus, for Olivia, the relocation is harder and promises to be even harder, since their finances are not quite as great as she has led Nick to believe, and she must somehow reinvigorate her decorating business in their new location. In this book, we follow the couple as they juggle moving to Sullivans Island and their summer visits with Olivia’s latest rich client, Maritza, to some rich hideaways across the globe. However, this is not a fast-moving thriller, filled with suspense and lots of action or a wild, exotic plot, but it is well written and held my interest almost from the start, though I did have a bit of difficulty getting into it. Nevertheless, after a few chapters, I was hooked, waiting to see what would come next. Of the couple, I enjoyed Nick the most. His bouts of wisdom and history coupled with his dry humor made me want to know more about this endearing man. I could see why, as Olivia, said, his students loved him. History was everything to Nick, and he was regularly spouting little known, esoteric facts about the local in which they were at that time. Maritza, Olivia’s rich client and also good friend, was not the easiest person to take or like, but she did have many endearing qualities. Still, I never did begin to even like her filthy rich husband Bob until close to the end when his true self came out.This will never be one of my favorite books by this author. Nevertheless, I enjoyed reading it, and it brought endless joys of leisure time as I read it on a mini summer vacation. I think anyone looking for a good summer read will enjoy this one. It is the kind of book you can pick up, read, put down for a bit and then return to without missing a beat, or being preoccupied about what is happening next. I received this from Library Thing to read and review.
  • (5/5)
    All Summer Long – Dorothea Benton FrankIt's hard to describe why I liked this book so much. All of Ms. Frank's books are based in the south, have family conflicts and end up with believable resolutions. This one resonated with me very differently than the stereotypical southern family drama – old school, old family south vs those 'nasty' yankees and their 'weird' ways.This is a book with scenarios that would fit no matter what part of the country or for that matter the world the characters happened to be placed. Maybe it is the way the underlying plot is so true to life, carefully weaved into the apparently exciting lives of the characters.The two main couples live the 'good' life – Olivia and Nick – semi retiring and downsizing to the Lowcounty, but are conflicted about what how much downsizing is needed and the actual move from New York City; Bob and Maritza – parents of Gladdie, clients of Olivia (interior decorator to the 'high and mighty') with family issues galore: ex wives, nanny issues, and a flotilla of 'interesting' friends.Normally, this cast of characters would not appeal to me, but the underlying daily activities and conflicts ring true – whether wrapped in a lush private caribbean island or on a private yacht sailing the Mediteranean Sea. Ms. Frank expertly weaves the two families stories together, exposes the underbelly of family life that can translate to any environment and any income level.
  • (2/5)
    It pains me to write this as I am a big fan of Dorothea Benton Frank's books, but, this one was a big disappointment for me. The charm of her writing has always been how she draws you into the Lowcountry setting and makes you feel like you are actually there. This one strays too far away from the Lowcountry setting into the lives of the wealthy and spoiled and therefore, loses the normal charm. The characters were not likable and the story just did not flow well. I really hope in the future, that she will stay with her Lowcountry settings and not venture away from the wonderful heartwarming tales she is known for. Many thanks to the publisher and Library Thing for providing an advance review copy through the Early Reviewers program!