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My Sister's Keeper: A Novel

My Sister's Keeper: A Novel


My Sister's Keeper: A Novel

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (392 valoraciones)
Longitud:
13 horas
Publicado:
Mar 29, 2016
ISBN:
9781508224280
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

New York Times bestselling author Jodi Picoult is widely acclaimed for her keen insights into the hearts and minds of real people. Now she tells the emotionally riveting story of a family torn apart by conflicting needs and a passionate love that triumphs over human weakness.

Anna is not sick, but she might as well be. By age thirteen, she has undergone countless surgeries, transfusions, and shots so that her older sister, Kate, can somehow fight the leukemia that has plagued her since childhood. The product of preimplantation genetic diagnosis, Anna was conceived as a bone marrow match for Kate-a life and a role that she has never challenged...until now. Like most teenagers, Anna is beginning to question who she truly is. But unlike most teenagers, she has always been defined in terms of her sister-and so Anna makes a decision that for most would be unthinkable, a decision that will tear her family apart and have perhaps fatal consequences for the sister she loves.

My Sister's Keeper examines what it means to be a good parent, a good sister, a good person. Is it morally correct to do whatever it takes to save a child's life, even if that means infringing upon the rights of another? Is it worth trying to discover who you really are, if that quest makes you like yourself less? Should you follow your own heart, or let others lead you? Once again, in My Sister's Keeper, Jodi Picoult tackles a controversial real-life subject with grace, wisdom, and sensitivity.
Publicado:
Mar 29, 2016
ISBN:
9781508224280
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro


Sobre el autor

Jodi Picoult received an AB in creative writing from Princeton and a master’s degree in education from Harvard. The recipient of the 2003 New England Book Award for her entire body of work, she is the author of twenty-six novels, including the #1 New York Times bestsellers House Rules, Handle With Care, Change of Heart, and My Sister’s Keeper, for which she received the American Library Association’s Margaret Alexander Edwards Award. She lives in New Hampshire with her husband and three children. Visit her website at JodiPicoult.com.

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4.3
392 valoraciones / 404 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    This was my first introduction to Jodi Picoult. There were posters all over London for this book and I thought it looked interesting. I read it the entire trip home on the plane. I couldn't put it down. I was so shocked throughout the entire book and the final part just blew me away. I had to recommend this book and this author to all my friends. Most of them didn't know who she was either. Probably one of my top all time favorite books. My Mom and I still talk about it and were not happy with the way the movie finished. That REALLY disappointed us. But this book is a must read for any book lover.
  • (4/5)
    A child is conceived just for the purpose of keeping her older sibling alive. The child decides to seek counsel to allow her to make her own decisions on medial procedures. It is heartbreaking all the way around. Why does she want to make her own decisions? Will her parents let her after a lifetime of being her sisters keeper. The ending is probably the only way it could end. And it is a surprise.
  • (5/5)
    This is the first book I've read by this author, but it certainly won't be the last. A real page turner.
  • (5/5)
    I'm not sure I have sufficient words to describe how much I loved and hated this book. Normally, I hate the multiple points of view in books, but Jodi Picoult does it in a way that flows so well that you don't feel turned off by it. I developed feelings for every character in this book. It's hard not to! Anna and Kate are both stuck in a situation that neither wants to be in. There's no sense of fairness in it. If Anna stops giving, Kate suffers. If Anna keeps giving of herself, then Anna suffers. It's sad, it's frustrating, and it's just a crying shame that life can be this cruel.

    I also felt for Brian, Sara, Jesse, and Julia, and Campbell. Being the parent of a sick child is heart-wrenching, but having to go through the legal process would taste one's patience and their sanity. All throughout this book, I questioned if this was even ethical. It certainly doesn't feel normal, and maybe that's why we need ethics committees/ethics panels. It would be hard to take a medical situation such as this and discuss what really is the right decision for everybody. Because no matter the result, someone gets hurt. Someone suffers. And the damage may be irreparable.

    This is definitely a book club book that I would recommend to any group that wants a lively discussion. I don't regret picking up this book. It's been an eye-opener and it's still on my mind and probably will be for a good number of days. I'm planning to watch the movie to see how closely it follows the book.
  • (5/5)
    I was prepared for this book to be emotionally manipulative but I was very pleased. Jodi Picoult explored the theme in so much depth that I got very attached tomn some of the characters and wanted them to continue in other books but the story makes that impossible,What is it like for a family to have a terminally ill child? Kate had a very dangerous form of childhood leukemia, there seemed to be now hope for her. No one was a genetic match for her. Not her father, Brian, who never had a college education but was committed to saving lives as a fireman, not her mother who was an attorney, and not her brother, Jessie, the loner, troubled and unable to control hi s anger. Kate' s doctor told them that the best march would a personally genetically close to Kate as possible, that was Anna who was a genetically engineered baby.I admit that there were many times that I got angry with Anna' s mother and I did not understand how both parents could let their son self destruct but I can remember what it is like to be thirteen and never asked if she wanted to continue to be Kate' s donor. And what about Kate' s feelings? Kate had to adopt a sense of humor to bring her family back to earth.My family had never been in this situation so this story opened my eyes to difficult decisions made by the family, the legal considerations, moral, ethical and those of love. I highly recommended My Sister's Keeper by Jodi Picoult. Please do not give on this book early on, it is well worth sticking it out!
  • (4/5)
    Couple have 2nd daughter in order to have a donor for their dying other daughter.
  • (5/5)
    About a family with a daughter diagnosed with leukemia at 2. The couple has a child genetically conceived to be a donor for the sick daughter. At 16, Kate is tired of being sick. At 13, Anna wants to be free.
    The story line is good. Jesse is predictable as the arsonist. It's predictable who dies in the end, but I didn't guess on the "how." And I didn't figure out what the service dog was for.
    This book was MUCH better than The Pact.
  • (4/5)
    This was one of the most powerful books I have ever read, then ending will shock even the most keen reader and Picoult keeps you wanting more with every page.
  • (5/5)
    Tears, tears, and more tears !!
  • (5/5)
    My favorite from this author. Touching with some shocking plot twists. I really enjoy books that change point of view from character to character.
  • (5/5)
    Brian and Sara Fitzgerald thought they had a complete and perfect family when their second child, daughter Kate, was born. Then at two, Kate is diagnosed with leukemia, and life changes, completely. Treatment can stabilize Kate for a while, but remissions turn into relapses. And none of them, not Sara, not Brian, and not son Jesse, is a close enough match for the donations, including bone marrow, Kate will need for any hope of a cure.

    Sara and Brian take a gamble, at the limits of medical science and on the edges of medical ethics. They use in vitro fertilization to conceive another daughter, who will be the closest possible genetic match for Kate.

    Thirteen years later, Anna Fiztgerald files a lawsuit seeking medical emancipation from her parents.

    This is an emotionally complicated tale. Anna loves her sister Kate. Sara and Brian love all their children. Jesse loves both his sisters and would give anything to be able to donate what Kate needs to live. Kate loves her whole family, and can't escape from being the neediest member of the family, in need of everyone's support, but especially Anna's vital medical donations. Sara and Brian have a strong and loving relationship, but they're not always in agreement on what's best for their daughters.

    The story is told in the voices of each character, each of the Fitzgeralds, Anna's lawyer Campbell Alexander, and the guardian ad litem appointed by the court, Julia Romano. What we learn in these interwoven voices is that everyone in the family is struggling with guilt--over what they are doing, what they can't do, and over their complex feelings about those choices, failures, and the circumstances. It's Sara who gives us most of the history. Brian and Jesse in their different ways provide context, and it's Anna's choices and feelings that are driving the events of the story--or so it appears.

    Campbell and Julia have their own complicated personal history, and for each of them it affects how they respond to Anna, the Fitzgerald family, and the moral and ethical conundrum at the core of the family struggle.

    Picoult gives us a beautifully textured story, with good people in painful conflict as they all try to do the right thing as far as they can understand it. You won't like all characters equally, but you will sympathize with all of them.

    Highly recommended.

    I bought this book.
  • (4/5)
    In one version of my future, I attend graduate school so I can get a PhD in Philosophy, focusing on biomedical ethics. I find the topic endlessly fascinating, and full of such interesting and open-ended questions. So I can’t believe that I waited this long to read this book. I’d really like to dive into the subject matter of the book, so if you’re planning on reading it and want to avoid all manner of spoilers, here’s my one sentence review: it’s good, it grapples with interesting issues, and the version on Audible is probably the first time I’ve really enjoyed a novel as an audiobook. Also – don’t watch the movie version (which I’ve been doing while writing this review). It’s just so different, and the choices they make really take away from the story the book is trying to tell.

    The basic premise of the book is that Anna is seeking medical emancipation from her parents, who want her to give a kidney to her dying sister Kate. Anna is 13, Kate is 16, and their older brother Jesse is 18. Anna was conceived as a genetic match for Kate after Kate was diagnosed with leukemia at age 2. The book is told in alternating chapters from many characters perspectives: Sara, the mother; Brian, the father; Anna; Jesse; Campbell, the attorney hired by Anna (pro-bono) to take on the case; and Julia, the guardian ad litem who is tasked with reporting to the court on what is best for Anna. The audio book really excels here because each character’s chapter is voiced by a different voice actor, which brings a real richness to the storytelling.

    One thing the book does extremely well is telling us Kate’s story without ever giving us Kate’s perspective on things. It’s a bold choice, considering she’s the reason for the situation. But Ms. Picoult knows what she’s doing – she wants us to all to consider what the rest of the family goes through, because they all revolve around Kate and her constant illness. Jesse’s chapters focus on the fact that he hasn’t had really any attention, and that he’s dealt with by becoming an arsonist (perfect choice, since Brian, the father, is a fire fighter). Campbell and Julia have a side story, a history, that both seems a bit unnecessary but also serves to remind us that people have lives that go on outside of this family. The parents’ chapters are heartbreaking and brutal, especially Sara’s chapter where she describes giving birth to Anna. She’s so focused on saving the umbilical cord blood that at no point does she express any interest in her newborn. I don’t doubt that Sara loves all of her children, but I don’t know how she can love them all with the same passion she carries for saving Kate.

    Anna’s chapters are challenging because she’s only 13, and she is so torn between loving her sister desperately and wanting a life of her own. Anna’s been called on to save her sister repeatedly, through stem cell donation, bone marrow transplants, and other donations. It’s affected her ability to do things, like go away to summer hockey camp (because her sister might need something from her). Anna and Kate are really close, though, so you know Anna is internally conflicted about wanting to save her sister and wanting a life for herself.

    The issues that Ms. Picoult is grappling with in this book are so numerous. Is there something wrong with genetically engineering a child with the express purpose of saving another child’s life? Can the parent love the engineered child in the same way – can he or she ever see the child as an independent being, as opposed to being the one who is responsible for saving the other child’s life? What about other siblings in a sick child’s family? Even outside of all the issues of the sister being asked to contribute to and save the other sister’s life, what happens inside a family where one child is chronically, likely terminally, ill? Is it wrong of the other children to want to have lives, even if their ill sibling can’t? And how can a parent be asked to provide opportunities to the healthy children when they are so focused on saving the sick one? I can’t imagine being in that situation – it seems so horribly challenging, and exhausting, and unfair. And finally, what about the child who wants to make decisions for herself and stop being tied to her sister? It seems so easy to say ‘it’s just a ______’ (blood donation, bone marrow donation, etc.), but really, there’s got to be a limit. And can we expect a child, or a teenager, to pass those limits?

    Having read the book, I’m still not sure how I feel about any of these questions. But they’re interesting, and as science progresses, we’re going to have to explore more of them.
  • (4/5)
    i read this book because the movie was coming out.
    i don't think i cried so much in a book other than the harry potter series. just heart-wrenching.
    much better than the movie (they changed the ending..wasn't half as sad as the book ending)
  • (5/5)
    My third Jodi Picoult novel, and I've accepted that they're all going to follow a similar theme: hotshot lawyer takes on tough/controversial/emotional case, and something links into their own private life. It's fine - it makes for good reading, and this was no exception. If I occasionally thought the case was being dragged out way longer than it would in real life (because people oddly chose not to speak to eachother unless it was in the environment of a courtroom) it dealt boldly with one of the ethical issues of the day - that of 'designer' babies, born to be a genetic match for an ill sibling. Such an emotional novel - hard to keep a dry eye in some places.
  • (4/5)
    This is one of my favorite books! I would recommend this to others.
  • (4/5)
    My Sister's Keeper was one of the most heart wrenching stories I've ever read. Anna's sister, Kate, is dying from a rare form of leukemia. She was conceived as a genetic match to help save her sister's life. It was supposed to be a one-time deal, but over the course of her 13 years, Anna has donated multiple times. Her sister is in need of a kidney and Anna's decided she's had enough of being told how to use her body. She decides to sue her parents for medical emancipation and refuses to give up her kidney. She knows the possible consequences of her actions, but she wants to be the one to make the choice, not her parents. What follows is a harrowing tale told in the view of six people affected by Anna's decision. I really can't say too much else without giving anything away, but this is a must read, albeit an emotional one.
  • (5/5)


    TEARS. A LOT OF TEARS.
    I was noisily sobbing by the last fifty or twenty pages, I think.

    And I would like to say that I like Campbell and Julia. Individually, and together. They add to my list of OTPs that is eternally getting longer.

    Still (spoiler part here I think?) the part that sucks is that the whole book was building up to that ending. And then it slaps you in the face with "Ha! Gotcha!" and renders everything useless. I know it's called a plot twist, but this sure is one of the worst ones. Not to mention one of the most heart-wrenching ones.

    SPOILER!!
    I liked the epilogue. Except the fact that Brian, who is one of my favorite characters, had the worst of it. It's unfair. So unfair. :(

    Seems like I can't properly review this right now. Currently in a fragile emotional state. (medyo OA but whatever. Hahaha)
  • (5/5)
    I both read the book and seen the movie and both made me sob. It is such a sad and powerful story.
  • (5/5)
    excellent, thought-provoking
  • (5/5)
    Great Book! Shocking ending.
  • (5/5)
    A real tear-jerker!
  • (5/5)
    So I don't usually go in for this type of book but a friend recommended it to me so I took a chance. Was not disappointed; I laughed and cried and got really really pissed off at the end!! Excellent story with really lovable characters.
  • (5/5)
    Simply amazing.
  • (4/5)
    Moving story
  • (4/5)
    Incredibly poignant!
  • (4/5)
    Truly moving, unexpected.
  • (5/5)
    OMG! This was the saddest book I have ever read in my life. Jodi Picoult had me going from the prologue. The main character was supposed to be Anna but running throughout the novel it is her sister, Kate who is the driving force. I don't know what to write that wouldn't ruin the book for other readers. I suppose the best thing I can say is that this book will grab you, make you choose a side and decide, as the characters do that there is no clear-cut answer to life's questions and that if you choose the right side you could very easily still lose. But I didn't lose in reading this book, though I cried buckets I feel I come away with a richer understanding of my beliefs and a greater sympathy for people having to make heart-wrenching decisions such as the Fitzgerald's.
  • (4/5)
    A good read!
  • (3/5)
    It was sad
  • (5/5)
    Unputdownable