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The House of the Spirits: A Novel

The House of the Spirits: A Novel

Escrito por Isabel Allende

Narrado por Thom Rivera y Marisol Ramirez


The House of the Spirits: A Novel

Escrito por Isabel Allende

Narrado por Thom Rivera y Marisol Ramirez

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (194 valoraciones)
Longitud:
18 horas
Publicado:
Mar 29, 2016
ISBN:
9781508215257
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

The unforgettable first novel that established Isabel Allende as one of the world's most gifted and imaginative storytellers.

The House of the Spirits brings to life the triumphs and tragedies of three generations of the Trueba family. The patriarch Esteban is a volatile, proud man whose voracious pursuit of political power is tempered only by his love for his delicate wife, Clara, a woman with a mystical connection to the spirit world. When their daughter, Blanca, embarks on a forbidden love affair in defiance of her implacable father, the result is an unexpected gift to Esteban: his adored granddaughter, Alba, a beautiful and strong-willed child who will lead her family and her country into a revolutionary future.

One of the most important novels of the 20th century, The House of the Spirits is an enthralling epic that spans decades and lives, weaving the personal and the political into a universal story of love, magic, and fate.

Publicado:
Mar 29, 2016
ISBN:
9781508215257
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro


Sobre el autor

Born in Peru and raised in Chile, Isabel Allende is the author of a number of bestselling and critically acclaimed books, including The House of the Spirits, Of Love and Shadows, Eva Luna, The Stories of Eva Luna, Paula, and The Japanese Lover. Her books have been translated into more than thirty-five languages and have sold more than 65 million copies worldwide. She is the receipient of the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, and she divides her time between California and Chile.

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4.4
194 valoraciones / 79 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    Excellent book. I enjoyed reading through the generations of family and the history surrounding the times. Esteban Trueba is a character not soon forgotten.
  • (5/5)
    This was book 4 of the Life's Library Book club. I've known about Allende and her work for years, but this was my first opportunity to read any. I'm glad I did.Its the story of Esteban and Clara Truela and their family in post-Colonial Chile. Esteban is a successful landowner who in the mirror of today's world is a completely unredeemable character. When I first read about some of the things he did, if I didn't know that it was a woman who wrote him, I might have been inclined to stop. Clara is bit of a mystic and their daughter and granddaughter both impress and disappoint their parents as they live their mostly upper crust lives in a country that is headed towards revolution. An excellent read. One of the interesting literary devices Allende uses, is that any chapter focusing on Esteban is told in the first person, everything else is in the third person by a narrator who is telling the family story from the future and knows what is going to happen. Several times she blatantly foreshadows things (mostly tragic) that will soon happen.Quotes: I blamed Rosa for the years I had spent dreaming of her deep within the mine. I didn't tell her that I hadn't seen any other women all that time except for a handful of shriveled old prostitutes, who serviced the whole camp with more good will than ability.He was the closest thing to a friend that Trueba had within a radius of fifty miles, but his monumental pride prevented him from recognizing in the man any virtues beyond those that marked him as a good peon. Trueba was not one to encourage intimacy with his subordinates. Pedro Segundo hated him, even though he had never given a name to the tortured feeling that gripped his soul and filled him with confusion. It was a mixture of fear and resentful admiration.9/10 S: 5/8/19 - 6/3/19 (27 Days)
  • (5/5)
    Just simply excellent storytelling. While the scope of the work (over 3 generations) is epic, the realization of the work is of a more intimate nature. Love, power, politics and strong (although somewhat eccentric) female characters to go with a strong, visual story and a touch of magical realism ... what else do you really need?
  • (4/5)
    I probably would have given this book 5 starts if My interest hadn't waned a bit at the end. Allende is a great writer and the translation is well done so it is allways a pleasure to read one of her books. This family was odd from the start, there was no way their story would be anything else but a little strange and over the top, just the kind of dynamic I like to read.
  • (5/5)
    In the first few pages I was very disappointed that I bought this book. It seemed so derivative ofGabriel Garcia Marquez that I was embarrassed for the author. I stuck with it because despite my frustration, there were some very funny moments. As the novel develops, the characters pull you in and the complex landscape of three generations captured my imagination. In the last third of the novel, I could not put it down. Without saying too much I'll just add that Allende contributes some very beautiful and unique thought on the cyclical, ironic, introverted nature of our lives. I have no doubt that this story and these characters will stay with me as I continue to reflect on how personalities develop in a family and how people cope with power or the lack there of...
  • (4/5)
    I read this one long ago and have always been captivated by the deep and intertwined stories and lives of each character. The lines between what is real and what could not possibly be are blurry making for a captivating journey of imagery and family ties. My first introduction to Allende and what led me to discover Marquez and others who write magical realism.
  • (4/5)
    I hated Esteban Trueba, who narrates part of this novel, and figures prominently in the rest of it. But, I liked the book. To me, this is a real accomplishment of the author.....here is an unsympathetic character/narrator, who nevertheless participates in a compelling story of 3 generations of women.Ms. Allende has told a story of family, and at the same time, a socio-political story of Latin America, with a perfect balance between the two.Well worth reading.
  • (5/5)
    This was a great book all the way through. I really enjoyed it!
  • (5/5)
    One of the most masterfully written of the magical realism genre.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful wonderful wonderful book. All of the comparisons to Garcia Marquez are truely deserved, in regard to both structure and the quality of the writing. The story is engrossing, the characters stay with you long after the book has been finished. What adds the extra touch is the ability of Allede to write about a terrible subject so close to her and her famiy with such beauty.
  • (4/5)
    My first Allende book and the best. It was a little supernatural which I usually do not like; but this was well done and the historical aspects about Chile were good. The movie by the same name was true to the novel and good as well. Read in the 1990's or about that time, I think
  • (3/5)
    I thought that this book was just ok. I couldn't bring myself to care about any of the characters. However, I found it to be well written.
  • (4/5)
    I read 'The House of the Spirits' on my wife's recommendation, who, like others compared it to Marquez's 'One-Hundred Years of Solitude'. There are certainly superficial similarities, but I think that most would agree with the assertion that Marquez's work is the suprerior one. As I made my way through the text, it occured to me that it felt less like a novel than a collection of interconnected short stories (like Bradbury's 'The Martian Chronicles'). Some of the vignettes were quite compelling, others disturbing; much of the book seemed to just coast by without any significant momentum. Allende deserves much credit for her vividly drawn, complex, and sympathetic characters. In fact, the strength of her characters, along with some subtle and incisive social commentary, is what makes the book at all worth reading. If these characters could have been placed within the structure of a more engrossing plot, the novel would surely be a masterpiece. As it stands, it is quite remarkable.
  • (5/5)
    This novel made me wish I could read it in the original Spanish. Allende is a gifted writer and her stories are filled with life. I cna only wonder what nuances I would perceive if I wasn't forced to read a translation. This novel obviously had appeal as it was made into a film. But, like many such films it paled in comparison to the novel.This is the story of the Trueba family. And like "The Thorn Birds" we follow the family through many years. Seeing them grow, fight, struggle, mourn, etc. At the heart is the family patriarch desperate to keep things the same in a changing world. A great book - highly recommended!
  • (5/5)
    Excellent. Impressive. I had avoided reading this for some time, being put off by the title, I guess, but I was wrong. The characters are interesting, complex and believable. The plot is intricate and compelling. Although the story ends with the military dictatorship in power in Chile, and the reader not knowing the fate of Alba and Miguel, the real ending lies in Alba's realization that her torture and rape is part of a chain of events that started when her grandfather raped the grandmother of her torturer, and if she should now seek vengence, it would just be another link in the chain "and so on down through the centuries in an unending tale of sorrow, blood and love . . . I have to break that terrible chain."
  • (5/5)
    I don't know why it took me so long to read Allende's first book! Just like all her others, she weaves a beautiful story that spans generations of strong, magical women in the midst of revolution. I highly recommend this novel.
  • (3/5)
    This is a book I have often heard people reference throughout the years, but that I never took time to read. It wasn't until I read Like Water for Chocolate that it came to my attention through a member recommendation on Librarything. I have really mixed feelings about this novel. First off I think it is safe to say that I am not really a fan of the magical realism genre. While I enjoyed the Allende's character development throughout, I was a bit annoyed by the "magical" aspects of the novel. Allende does a fantastic job of weaving the tale of three generations of the Trueba family from Chile with a great socio-political discussion throughout. The author's use of both the first and third person point of view as well as the way she tells the story in a non-chronological way in addition to the depth of character development make it a well written novel. However, I found after the first 200 pages that I had to force myself to finish reading it. At some points the narrative seems to drag and overall I did not find the book either entertaining or a piece of literature that teaches us about the human condition as much as it teaches us about society as a whole. I was a bit disappointed by this book.
  • (4/5)
    This book tells the story of a family through several generations. There are a number of polarized perspectives and clashes (young versus old, practical versus spiritual, rich vs poor, etc.). As we watch events unfold over time we can see how these dichotomous strong opinions/ perspectives seemed important to the person holding it at one moment in time but are later viewed as futile. The book concludes with a very optimistic message of forgiveness and how it's more important than anything else because it's what breaks down the destructive patterns that are formed by these strong opinions.
  • (4/5)
    This was my first book from Isabel Allende, I didn't know what to expect. She's a great story-teller and mixes historical fact with old wive's tales and the supernatural very well. I read it in about 3-4 days. I couldn't put the book down. Her writing is also very descriptive and vivid. Too bad Hollywood did a bad job on the movie version of it.
  • (4/5)
    An epic story spanning four generations. Beautiful language and imagery. I think the magic realism makes this an easier read for those who are used to reading fantasy, but worth a try for those of you who are not. This was popular with our book group, whose reading tastes are very diverse.
  • (3/5)
    Isabel Allende really writes about the truth and heart of her characters. I thought this book was beautiful, and magical, the "magical realism" everyone talks about. Truthfully, I didn't think I would like it very much, so I was surprised when I liked it right off the bat. Notes from family journals comprise the story of 4 generations. There are things I hated about characters, and things I loved. It really made me want to read more by her. I think if I wasn't sick when I read it I would have liked it more too, I wouldn't have skimmed (I blame that on the Benadryl.) But truly, I liked the undertones, the author's voice, and I'm anxious to read more.
  • (5/5)
    one of the best I have read to Isabel Allende....
    i like the spiritual sides in Clara character.....
    beauty and sensitivity of Rosa...
    and Jaime loneliness......
  • (2/5)
    I actually never finished it. It was never compelling enough to entice me to read it, and I eventually became tired of the long narratives.
  • (1/5)
    Maybe I'm biased because I don't like latin-american "magical realism" literature but I was bored by the gory details, the predictable family saga, the mentality backwardness... I think this is just another cheap bestseller, mixing all the right ingredients (sex, violence, supposedly transcendant, etc.) to sell to the masses. No message, no suspense, no poetry, no nothing. Won't be reading anything else by this author.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this rich and imaginative book. You have to read and re-read it to get the feel of the musty old farm house, the dusty fields and the levitating furniture.
  • (5/5)
    I came across this novel after having read several works by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, most notably Love in the Time of Cholera. I found this novel to be so similar in style and substance to the aforementioned work as to be remarkable. Inasmuch as I enjoyed LitToC immensely, that is a good thing. Both novels are set in early 20th century South America and feature aspects of magical realism for which Marquez is justly famous.The novel revolves around three generations of the Trueba family, a well to do clan anchored by an irascible patriarch, Estaban. The story tracks the political metamorphosis of the South American country of Chile, from autocratic conservative democracy through a period of Socialist revolution and finally to Fascist military dictatorship. Inasmuch as the author of this work is Isabel Allende, a close relative of the former President of Chile before the military junta led by Augusto Pinchet took control of the country, perhaps we can read this as something of a thinly veiled historical account.Alternating between the first person account of the aforementioned Estaban and the more prevalent third person narrative, the reader is introduced to a procession of highly interesting characters, including successively more liberal and independent generations of the Trueba family, both legitimate and the bastard offspring of his country estate. The prose is sprinkled throughout with foreshadowing and brilliant imagery. This is an absolutely top class piece of work, both in the quality of the writing and the history and political lesson contained therein. Highly recommended for anyone with an interest in South America, politics or who has enjoyed the writings of Marquez.
  • (4/5)
    Excellent read that chronicles four generations of a family living in Chile. Politics is brilliantly weaved throughout the story when the author alludes to the Pinochet regime and the onset of political violence. This book is a wonderful example of magical realism, a genre that mixes reality with the fantastical.
  • (5/5)
    i LOVED this book! it introduced me to magic realism as a genre. it's set in chile and goes through the life and a couple generations of one family, including relationships and a political rebellion. love her style of writing!
  • (3/5)
    This was an ok read about different generations of one family. Overall, the characters were well described, but the parts with the visions and ghosts could have been left out as far as I'm concerned.
  • (5/5)
    Such a beautiful book with trully engaging story lines.