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Dance Hall of the Dead

Dance Hall of the Dead

Escrito por Tony Hillerman

Narrado por George Guidall


Dance Hall of the Dead

Escrito por Tony Hillerman

Narrado por George Guidall

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (33 valoraciones)
Longitud:
6 horas
Publicado:
Sep 17, 2008
ISBN:
9781501907623
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

Two Native-American boys have vanished into thin air, leaving a pool of blood behind them. Lieutenant Joe Leaphorn of the Navajo Tribal Police has no choice but to suspect the very worst, since the blood that stains the parched New Mexican ground once flowed through the veins of one of the missing, a young ZuNi. But his investigation into a terrible crime is being complicated by an important archaeological dig and a steel hypodermic needle. And the unique laws and sacred religious rites of the ZuNi people are throwing impassable roadblocks in Leaphorn's already twisted path, enabling a craven murderer to elude justice or, worse still, to kill again.
Publicado:
Sep 17, 2008
ISBN:
9781501907623
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro


Sobre el autor

TONY HILLERMAN served as president of the Mystery Writers of America and received the Edgar and Grand Master Awards. His other honors include the Center for the American Indian’s Ambassador Award, the Spur Award for Best Western Novel, and the Navajo Tribal Council Special Friend of the Dineh award. A native of Oklahoma, Tony Hillerman lived in Albuquerque, New Mexico, until his death in 2008.

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4.4
33 valoraciones / 20 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (3/5)
    Again, Tony Hillerman brings us back to the Navajo and Checkerboard Reservation where Joe Leaphorn uses his knowledge of the Navajo way of life, superstition and ritual to solve a murder. This time though Leaphorn is working with other police agencies and the FBI, making us witness to the strings that prevent true cooperation or respect between the agencies.
  • (3/5)
    It took me forever to get into this book, though the plot and setting were interesting enough. I found the characters underdeveloped and hard to relate to, so it was hard to care about what they were doing and saying. Still, this was a nicely creative story and involves some elements of Native American cultures that don't often figure in murder mysteries.
  • (4/5)
    I found this second Tony Hillerman Navajo Mystery novel very enjoyable. It's not a cozy but has a very smooth feel about it, in large part due to the personality traits of our protagonist, Joe Leaphorn. Joe is very appealing, with his methodical, logical and philosophical approach to police work. Along the way, the reader learns about the Navajo and Zuni culture and religious practices, as well as a bit of archeology. The crime is set up in a novel way and I found this short mystery a refreshing change of pace. I look forward to continuing this long series with anticipation.
  • (4/5)
    This is the second book in the "Navajo Detective" series by Tony Hillerman and the first in which detective Joe Leaphorn is the principal charactor. "Dance Hall of the Dead" is a sad story. It focuses on the murder, or maybe the disppearance, of two boys, a Navajo and a Zuni, as well as Joe Leaphorn's efforts to find the missing boys. The riddle is entwined with Zuni religious ceremonies which Leaphorn, a Navajo, tries to understand.

    Tony Hillerman's novels with their brilliant depiction of Native American cultures and life in our Western desert are so much more than detective thrillers. They offer a rare insight into a culture that was ancient when the European settlers arrived in America. The reader will become captivated by the ceremonials, religious practices and the daily lives of these native people.
  • (5/5)
    George Guidall is the best reader for Hillerman’s mysteries! So glad these classic, beautifully read audiobooks got moved to digital.

    One disappointment is that at higher volume I could hear the drone of the disc drive they were copied from. (Recorded Books - this is on you.)

    I love Tony Hillerman’s series. The stories are well written, immersing the listener into the New Mexico landscape and lives of the characters. Glad to hear these again.
  • (5/5)
    law-enforcement, Hopi, Navajo, murder-investigation, historical-research, lore*****I figured it was time to revisit a series that I had enjoyed some years ago, so when it was offered as audio by Chirp I Leaphorned at the chance. Bad pun, I admit it. However this is a good convoluted mystery full of misdirection, Zuni and Navajo lore, suspense, red herrings, and the universal squabbles between branches of law enforcement. I loved it and plan to reread the entire series before winter is through with us!George Guidall has always been an exceptional narrator.
  • (2/5)
    Could never get comfortable with this book. As part of a book discussion series looking at modern dective fiction, I found this to be a big disappointment. I expect a mystery to grab me and totally involve me in the story and getting the mystery solved. I found this book too long for the story being told and filled with disconnects - many characters just dropped when they could have contributed a great deal to the mystery.
  • (3/5)
    This is the second in Hillerman's Joe Leaphorn series and was first published in 1973. It is a stronger book than the first book, "The Blessing Way." In the first book Leaphorn was almost a secondary character, whereas here he is clearly in the front and we follow his investigation into the disappearance of two youths - one probably dead and the other either the guilty party or hiding for fear of losing his life also. In fact it struck me how different Leaphorn was in each book - perhaps Hillerman decided to make him a stronger character and a different one. In any event, other than the name, they seemed like different characters. There is a nice anthropological element to this story that I liked. There is an underlying current of Zuni vs. Navajo cultural differences and resentment. As far as the mystery goes I'm not sure I can give it high marks. The reason is that by the time page 50 came around I already decided who was responsible for the murder and more or less why. I don't try to puzzle out mysteries as a general rule so it must have been pretty obvious. The ending is a little bothersome and caused me to dislike Leaphorn a bit, or maybe I was just disappointed in him. Overall an OK read.
  • (5/5)
    Although I had read this mystery before, I had little memory of it when I started listening to this audiobook edition. What a treat! Joe Leaphorn is such a marvelous character and George Guidall does a brilliant narration. I enjoy most of Hillerman's books, and missed Jim Chee a bit while listening to this early entry in the Navajo Mystery series. However, this book has the additional draw of the Zuni aspect - I found the interplay between Navajo, Zuni, and the various Caucasian factions (the state police, the FBI & DEA, the anthropologists, the hippies) fascinating.
  • (4/5)
    When a young Navajo boy disappears and it turns out his Zuni friend may have been killed for revealing religious ceremony secrets, Lieutenant Joe Leaphorn has to figure out where the kachina spirits meet since Leaphorn is told that the missing boy is making his way there to make amends. The second book in a series can sometimes be a bit of a let-down, but in this case, Hillerman's first installment was the wavering one since it had a split viewpoint and in this installment, Leaphorn is our main character and his viewpoint is strong enough to carry the very high-stakes story. In this story we also get a simple introduction to Zuni religion and the wonders that are kachinas, in this case specifically kachina dancers and the fascinating masks they wear when representing their respective supernatural spirits. The books in this series are obviously fiction and not anthropology textbooks, but I do enjoy very much how Hillerman mixes his mysteries with southwest Native American culture to create a niche of his own.
  • (3/5)
    Not one of Hillerman's best, but still an enjoyable read.
  • (4/5)
    This is the second book in the Joe Leaphorn series and I enjoyed it. It was a little confusing in places, mostly because I know absolutely nothing about the Navaho religious rituals, let alone the Zuni ones and both are strongly intertwined in this mystery within a mystery.

    I still like Joe, I admire his integrity and I love the way his character works through things, at his own pace and in his own time.

    This story centers around the death of a Zuni boy and the disappearance of his best friend, a Navaho. Joe is searching for the friend, afraid that either he killed the Zuni, or worse, that he is a target of a murderer.

    I didn't see the ending coming, and I don't know why because it was so obvious when Joe explained it to me - guess that is a sign of an excellent author, give all the facts as clues and still confuse the reader.

    I'll be going on in this series.
  • (4/5)
    A young Hopi boy is the first to die, and his friend is missing. Jim Chee is detailed to look for the missing Navajo boy, and uncovers a mystery that includes a hippie commune, an archeological dig, and broken Hopi taboos that exact a terrible punishment.
  • (3/5)
    Leaphorn pursues marked Navaho adolescent with an implausible smack at academics. Poetic end.
  • (4/5)
    It is a well written mystery, more than the mystery aspect it is the writing which I liked and the way author was able to bring about the native American atmosphere interwoven into the plot..
  • (4/5)
    An early Hillerman novel, with less of the smooth story-telling that prevails in the later books of the Navajo Tribal Police series. It was interesting to read of Tribal politics and religious practices of the Zũni and Navajo. The missing-boys-possible-murder investigation conflicted with white law enforcement, in a very believable telling. Unfortunately, several incidents had no contribution to the plot, that I could see, and the story often lacked clarity. Why was the hippie commune and potential drugs distribution mentioned other than as a foil for the detective (Joe Leaphorn) to find where one of the boys might have gone? That whole scenario just petered out. The subsequent chasing / tracking the lost boy became a tedious middle to the story. The academic dishonesty and the impact on the graduate student's career was an interesting twist that left the reader to decide how that part ended. However, I found it unsatisfying that Susanne, the girl from the commune who accompanies Leaphorn on his quest for the boy, is left out of the dénouement. I thought the ultimate fate of the murderer was appropriate but the fumbling around to get to that point was a 'meh' piece of writing.
  • (4/5)
    This early Joe Leaphorn mystery has an intricate plot, interesting characters and lots of Indian lore, both Zuni and Navajo which adds up to an entertaining listening experience. The masterful narrations of George Guidall make the Hillerman novels one of the few book series that I prefer to listen to rather than read. Recommended—4 stars
  • (5/5)
    Lt. Joe Leaphorn of the Navajo police becomes involved in the case of the disappearance and death of a young boy in this story the second of the Leaphorn series. Ernesto a young Zuñi has been chosen to impersonate the FireGod in the incoming Zuñi sacred celebrations. He has been training so that he can run, dance and participate with great strength. Pround of the fact that he has been so honored he could't help tell his friend George about it which was improper thing todo but he needed George's help in his workouts.

    When his body is found cruelly murdered George takes off trying to right the karma. But as is often the case one death follows another and Leaphorn knows he has to find George before anyone else does.

    Leaphorn has always believed that there is a reason for everything. Every cause has it's effect. Every action it's reaction. There is a synchronicity to nature. In all things there is a pattern but in this situation Joe Leaphorn is struggling to find it.

    Tony Hillerman creates a wonderful picture of a certain time and place. He educates the reader in this book about several of the very differences between the Navajo and the Zuñi both in their creation beliefs, and the way they live their lives.

    The value of a book is what you take away from it and Dance Hall Of The Dead is a gem.
  • (3/5)
    Audiobook performed by George Guidall3*** It's book number two in Tony Hillerman's Joe Leaphorn series ... need I say more?Good mysteries with a little Native American cultural information in the mix. I love the way Leaphorn thinks things through before acting. George Guidall does a good job on the audio. He has good pacing and I really like the way he voices Leaphorn. There were times when Guidall’s performance transported me to my childhood, listening to my grandfather (or grandmother, or aunts or uncles) telling stories in the dark, as we all sat on the porch of a summer evening. But the press of daily life got in my way and the library deadline was fast approaching, so I abandoned the audio and finished reading the second half of the book in a day.Definitely a series I will continue.
  • (4/5)
    Dance Hall of the Dead is a much stronger book than The Blessing Way, Hillerman's first novel in the Joe Leaphorn/Jim Chee series.Dance Hall features Joe Leaphorn front and center and introduces us to the ways he gathers facts and fits them together to solve the mystery. In this story, its figuring out how a Navajo boy gets mixed up in Zuñi religious practices and ends up murdered. Through persistence and the understanding of how culture affects actions, Leaphorn solves the mystery and saves another boy from murder.Quite enjoyable.