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And Tango Makes Three

And Tango Makes Three


And Tango Makes Three

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (101 valoraciones)
Longitud:
8 minutos
Publicado:
Jun 2, 2015
ISBN:
9781442386372
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

In the zoo there are all kinds of animal families. But Tango's family is not like any of the others.
Publicado:
Jun 2, 2015
ISBN:
9781442386372
Formato:
Audiolibro


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4.5
101 valoraciones / 127 Reseñas
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Reseñas de críticos

  • "And Tango Makes Three," a book explicitly designed to make conversations with children about same-sex couples and nontraditional families easier, has made the top 10 most frequently banned books list nine times since its release in 2005. It's a cute book about two male penguins falling in love, based on a true story of the penguins Roy and Silo pairing with each other at the Central Park Zoo.

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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    Like the other penguin couples in New York City's Central Park Zoo, Roy and Silo enjoyed spending time together, and eventually made themselves a nest of rocks. But when those other couples began laying eggs and hatching penguin chicks, suddenly our penguin pair found themselves left out in the cold. No matter how they imitated the other couples, even going so far as trying to hatch a stone, they never ended up with a baby penguin to love. Then one of the penguin pairs laid two eggs, and the zookeeper decided to give Roy and Silo their chance at a family...Based upon true events, And Tango Makes Three chronicles the real-life adventures of two (and eventually three!) penguins at the Central Park Zoo. Because it has been interpreted as a story about same-sex parents (rightly, in my opinion), it has become one of the most challenged children's books in the United States. For my part, I thought it was a sweet little tale, one which fills a need, when it comes to depicting same-sax parents. I also found the watercolor artwork by Henry Cole immensely cute, and appreciated the way it captured Ray and Silo's emotional journey, as they long for and then eventually get a chick of their own. Recommended to anyone interested in challenged children's books, as well as to those looking for picture-books featuring same-sex parents.
  • (5/5)
    This book walks the reader through the real life love-story of two male penguins in the Central Park Zoo. The book discusses all of the different ways a loving family can look, and then talks about how the two penguins made their own family when the zoo keepers gave them a foster-egg of their own. The themes are love, family, human-animal compassion, and the strength in being different. I really connected with the way the book discussed different styles of families, as this is a really good way to broach the ways in which we are all different with students.
  • (4/5)
    I thought this was a very sweet story, and an especially interesting one since it's true! I wonder if this unusual penguin family is still a unit.
  • (4/5)
    I really liked the story. It was well written. It is intended for younger children. It is a story about two male penguins that care for each other. After trying unsuccessfully to hatch a rock, the penguin keeper gives them an extra fertilized egg from another couple. They do all of the things necessary to ensure the egg is healthy and finally a baby girl penguin is hatched. The book does a good job of showing that a family isn't about what you are but about what you do. The reason I gave it four stars instead of five is because I didn't think the illustrations were as strong as the story.
  • (4/5)
    Two male penguins fell in love and want to have a baby penguin since all the other penguin couples have a family too. One day the zoo officer gave them an egg and the became a family.A nice story about the acceptance of homosexuality. Recommendable to share in class so that students see that homosexuality is nothing that can only happen to human-beings
  • (5/5)
    Absolutely wonderful book. In the most subtle and true fashion (since it is a true story), Tango, the tale of two male penguins who fell in love, adopted an egg, and raised it as their own baby, shows young readers that all parents, no matter whether they are a mom and a dad, two dads, or two moms, love their families. It is very much a book that says "gay families aren't any different!" without shoving the moral down your throat. I absolutely loved it.
  • (4/5)
    I don't know why all the to-do about this book. Or why it was banned in so many places. Very cute and innocent, and a good introduction to same sex families.
  • (5/5)
    I decided to read this picture book, because I was curious about all the fuss surrounding it. I can see why narrow-minded people found it offensive, but that's their own loss. This is a beautiful story, illustrated with simple bu cute pictures and told with simple, honest language. The story mentions families of various types and even emphasizes that this situation was rare; the point is family is family and there is nothing wrong with that.
  • (5/5)
    A cute (true) story about two male penguins, Roy and Silo, in the Central Park zoo in NYC that became a couple. Tthey realize that the "other" (read: heterosexual) couples can do something they can't - have babies. The zookeeper notices that Roy and Silo are distraught over this, and give the couple a fertile (but discarded) egg to raise as their own.This is a very good book to read to kids (I'd say in grades K-3), especially if there is a child with "non-traditional" parents, that simply explains that some families are different.
  • (5/5)
    And Tango Makes Three (2005) by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell, illustrated by Henry Cole, won the ASPCA Henry Bergh Children's Book Award. This beautiful book is based off of a true story about two male penguins who raise a baby penguin together in the New York Zoo. It's true that this is one of the most challenged books because it raises questions about non-traditional family lifestyles, but it's also a really great story with charming illustrations.I would use this story in my classroom to not only talk about non-traditional family lifestyles, but also to compare the differences and similarities between how penguins and humans raise their babies. Grades K-5.
  • (5/5)
    This is a GREAT book to read. It is a story about 2 male penguins named Silo and Roy that fall in love and do everything that a couple in love does. They see all the other penguins have a nest and an egg, Silo and Roy only have a nest and no egg. Until one day one of the zoo keepers gives them an egg that needs taken care of. After all of Roy and Silos hard work their egg finally hatches and they are a family. Even though this book is now "banned" I believe that this would be an excellent way to introduce same sex couples to young children. This book tells an amazing story and I absolutely adore it.
  • (5/5)
    Based on true events, this story teaches children about differences. This is a banned book due to its controversial topic of same sex relations. I believe it is a well written book and that children would enjoy this book. In today's world it is hard to believe parents would not want their children reading this book.
  • (4/5)
    A story of two chinstrap penguins named Roy and Silo is based on a true story. These two males penguins become very interested and attracted to each other. They hatch an egg that is laid by another penguin, and Roy and Silo become the first male penguin family This book is a great book for introducing gay rights to young readers, especially for the first time. This book also has been very controversial in education, because it probably offends conservative view points. Offensive or not, it is important for young readers to understand that this type of behavior is okay, and that their penguin family is perfectly functioning an okay. Its misunderstanding and ignorance of this subject that can lead to unnecessary bullying against what they do not understand.
  • (4/5)
    This story is about two penguins who are both males and fall in love with each other. Their unable to have a babies naturally so the zoo keeper of the penguins gives them an egg. Young children who totally not even question the story because of the issue having two fathers. Children would only see penguins.
  • (5/5)
    This is a touching story based on real events. Two males penguins become inseperable and even attempt to hatch a rock. The rock is replaced with a real egg and the couple hatch their own baby and make a lovely family of three. Great book to introduce diversity and gay rights at an early age.
  • (4/5)
    Two boy penguins at the Central Park Zoo live with each other as a pair. Wanting an egg like the other penguins in the zoo the zookeeper finds an egg that needs a home for the pair. The pair do their duty to keep the egg warm and it finally hatches. They are a family even though it is nontraditional. In the classroom: story time, listening skills, addressing who makes up a family
  • (1/5)
    I really did not like this book. To male penguins father a little girl penguin when they do not connect with any female penguins. This was a true story of this penguins family in Central Park Zoo. I would not read this to my students. I do not agree with this book.
  • (3/5)
    This is a story about 2 male penguins in a zoo who want to have a baby penguin just like all the other penguin couples. The zookeeper places a rock in their nest and the 2 male penguins take turns sitting on the egg until it hatches and they have a baby penguin to call their own.
  • (3/5)
    This story is about two male penguins in a zoo who sit on a rock thinking it is an egg to hatch. The zookeeper switches out the rock for an egg and the penguins take turns sitting on the egg and it hatches. The three penguins live together as a family in the zoo. This book does present homosexuality in a soft, appropriate way, but because it is such a controversial topic, I wouldn't read it to my future class.
  • (3/5)
    This is the true story of penguins in a zoo. Two male penguins act as partners like the other male and female pairs. They realize that they are missing something that all the other penguin couples have, little bablies. They find a rock and try to sit on it like the other penguins, and wait for it to hatch, but no baby. The zookeeper in the story noticed this and gave the two male penguin an egg that needed to parents to take care of it. The two male penguin sat on the egg all the time. they took turns and became dedicated parents to their special egg. One day their egg finally hatched, and the three of them lived happily in the zoo together.
  • (4/5)
    An egg was given to two male penguins and the two male penguins took turn nesting the egg. One penguin would hunt while the other would nest and vice versa. The egg eventually hatched and they became one big happy family.
  • (5/5)
    Roy and Silo are two penguins at the Central Park Zoo. They have many animals families. Roy and Silo aren't your average penguin couple, they are both male penguins. Roy and Silo see all the other penguin families and see that their is something that they are able to do that they can not. The other families can hatch baby penguins. One day one of the zookeepers noticed an unattended egg so he decided to let Roy and Silo take of it. Soon Tango was born. This book is a good book to read to a group of children, though the subject o homosexuality is a controversial thing this book is more than that.
  • (5/5)
    I was thoroughly impressed with this story. With all of the criticism that came regarding the themes within the story, I was expecting something completely different. Authors Richardson and Parnell tell the true story of Central Park Zoo penguins Roy and Silo. Roy and Silo fall in penguin love and become partners. One of the zoo keepers gives them an egg that another couple is unable to care for, and Roy and Silo care for the egg and the penguin baby (Tango) that is born out of it. The story is open minded and modern - a great story for children of all ages.
  • (5/5)
    Beautiful watercolors tell the true story of two penquins named Roy and Silo who fell in love at the Central Park Zoo. They wanted a baby like all the other penguin couples in the zoo and were confused when they did not get one, but Roy and Silo are boy penguins so they could not have a baby. The zoo keeper decided to give them an egg to hatch from a penguin couple that had more than one egg. Roy and Silo were as devoted to this egg as the other penguins parents and have been the loving parents of the chick named Tango that emerged from the egg. This lovely story simply talks about different kinds of families and how this family with two daddies is like all the other families, penguin and human. An enchanting book for ages 3-6 which can be read aloud or enjoyed one on one.
  • (5/5)
    Cute book about baby penguins given to two male penguins to raise. (based on true story)
  • (5/5)
    Loved this book that shows the diversities of real life- and not just human life but animal life as well. A cute story for small children learning about the different types of families.
  • (5/5)
    Peiguins create an out of the ordinary family in this sweet tale of love and acceptance.
  • (5/5)
    This is the true story of two male penguins in the Central Park Zoo who became a couple and hatched and raised a baby penguin. This introduces the subject of alternative families in a sensitive, age-appropriate way.
  • (5/5)
    The true story of two male penguins in love, who (thanks to their kind caretaker) got to adopt an egg and raise a little chick of their own. I found this story so touching even before it became a children's book, and even more so now. It is a great book to use if you're discussing different types of families with young students. It's also a great book for parents to read to their children so they can know that every family is different and that there is nothing wrong with that.
  • (5/5)
    "And Tango Makes Three" is a delightful picture book about the true story of two male penguins that raised an egg together named Tango. This book is highly controversial, but also highly necessary, as books that approach homosexuality in an appropriate way for young children are few and far between. This book belongs in every library, but librarians should note that it will be controversy and it may be hard to keep on the shelves; picture books about homosexuality tend to randomly disappear from libraries, causing many academic libraries to place copies of these books in non circulation.