Encuentra tu próximo/a audiolibro favorito/a

Conviértete en miembro hoy y escucha gratis durante 30 días
Rowan Hood: Outlaw Girl of Sherwood Forest

Rowan Hood: Outlaw Girl of Sherwood Forest

Escrito por Nancy Springer

Narrado por Emily Gray


Rowan Hood: Outlaw Girl of Sherwood Forest

Escrito por Nancy Springer

Narrado por Emily Gray

valoraciones:
3.5/5 (7 valoraciones)
Longitud:
3 horas
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2002
ISBN:
9781436144223
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

The murder of her mother leads 13-year-old Rowan to a desperate decision. She must set out alone across dangerous country to find the father she has never met: a famous outlaw of Sherwood Forest named Robin Hood. And when Robin is captured by the Sheriff of Nottingham, Rowan and an unlikely band of rescuers must use all their skills to set him free.

Publicado:
Jan 1, 2002
ISBN:
9781436144223
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor

Nancy Springer is the award-winning author of more than fifty books, including the Enola Holmes and Rowan Hood series and a plethora of novels for all ages, spanning fantasy, mystery, magic realism, and more. She received the James Tiptree, Jr. Award for Larque on the Wing and the Edgar Award for her juvenile mysteries Toughing It and Looking for Jamie Bridger, and she has been nominated for numerous other honors. Springer currently lives in the Florida Panhandle, where she rescues feral cats and enjoys the vibrant wildlife of the wetlands.

Relacionado con Rowan Hood

Audiolibros relacionados

Reseñas

Lo que piensa la gente sobre Rowan Hood

3.6
7 valoraciones / 1 Reseñas
¿Qué te pareció?
Calificación: 0 de 5 estrellas

Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    There is just a bit of sadness in reading Rowan Hood Returns as it brings to conclusion a simple but charming series featuring Rowan Hood of the Rowan Wood (daughter of Robin Hood). Both my daughter and I thoroughly enjoyed this series (and read through it quite quickly). We enjoyed reading each book in turn, learning a bit more about each member of her band of outlaws and their exploits. In this final book, we return (having come full circle once again) to Rowan, formerly Rosemary (she changed her name when her mother was murdered and she set out to find her father, the infamous outlaw Robin Hood). As we join the merry band once again, Princess Etty returns having learned the name of the killers of Rowan's mother. Having already sensed that "something" was about to happen, Rowan's heart fills with anger and rage and she vows (once again) to avenge her mothers' death. The band sets out...because none will allow the still injured Rowan (injury occurred in the first book) to make the journey herself. For all the action of this book, the true conflict is mainly internal. Rowan must explore within herself the conflicting emotions...she is a healer, the daughter of a woodwife, yet her gifts have all but fled as anger filled her and as she journey's forward, she seems hindered at every step. Her legs betray her, she can hardly walk, the trees and vines practically assault her...as if they do not want her to go and in her own heart she is conflicted between waiting to help and heal people and an overwhelming desire to put an end to the men who heartlessly killed her mother. How will it all end and will she ever find peace again if she takes the life of another in anger? Young readers will delight in discovering how all the details come together in the end. This last book is perhaps, contains the most twists of plot yet. There are two levels to the story, the first being the actual physical conflict and second being the emotional turmoil that Rowan experiences as the journey progresses. As with the other stories in this series, there is graphic detail about the cruelties of the age this book is set. Women are largely treated as property (as evidenced by Etty's description of the Knights advances toward her), peasants are made into outlaws often for the slightest "offences," winters and life are harsh and food is hard to come by. I think Springer did a wonderful job of depicting age appropriate material that gives young readers a realistic look at what life would have been like in this period for all classes, while maintaining a focus on the lower classes. I would definitely recommend this, and I give it four stars...I won't call it "fun" because there is a lot of tragedy and hardship...but it's definitely interesting and provides a window of insight into life in another time. I think readers aged 9-12 would most benefit from reading this, given the amount "mature" material that is covered in this book, and the series as a whole (murder, maiming by "man traps" - a punishment against poachers, threat of death, and so on). Rowan Hood Returns is a bit of a melancholy tale with a mostly happy ending that I think will charm many readers.