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Dark Emperor and Other Poems of the Night

Dark Emperor and Other Poems of the Night

Escrito por Joyce Sidman

Narrado por Myra Lucretia Taylor


Dark Emperor and Other Poems of the Night

Escrito por Joyce Sidman

Narrado por Myra Lucretia Taylor

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (24 valoraciones)
Longitud:
24 minutos
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2011
ISBN:
9781490639031
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Acclaimed author Joyce Sidman has received multiple awards for her books of poetry, including a Caldecott Honor for Red Sings from Treetops. Itself a Newbery Honor Book, Dark Emperor & Other Poems of the Night features several spellbinding poems about “the feast of sound and spark” that awakens with the raccoons, snails, owls, and crickets each night after sunset.
“In Sidman’s delicious poems, darkness is the norm, and there’s nothing to fear but the rising sun.”—Publishers Weekly
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2011
ISBN:
9781490639031
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor

The Newbery Honor winner and Sibert Medalist Joyce Sidman is today's foremost nature poet for children.  Accolades for her books include two Caldecott Honors, a Lee Bennet Hopkins Award, winner of the Claudia Lews Award, and many stars and best of lists.  For her award-winning body of work, she won the Award for Excellence in Poetry for Children. She lives in Wayzata, Minnesota. Visit www.joycesidman.com  

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4.4
24 valoraciones / 43 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    From the very beginning I was drawn to this book because of the wonderful illustration of the large owl on the front cover, lit up in the glow of the moonlight. What I really liked about this book was that each poem spoke of one specific animal or plant that thrives in the night. As a follow up on the subject of the poem, there is a paragraph on the adjacent page that give more information about the subject and under what conditions it thrives. The poems are smart, a good mixture between rhyming and not, a don't always tell you in so many words what animal the poem is speaking of. This is a great interactive tool with children, to have them guess what animal it is talking about. The illustrations in this book are absolutely amazing. They are engaging and are steeped in details. The art also has a darker, kind of grainy, quality about it that really help set the book within the evening hours. All in all, a very fun read, for both children and adults.
  • (5/5)
    Robust vocabulary integrated among intriguing and ghoulish descriptions of forester creatures.
  • (4/5)
    This is a book full of beautifully written poems about animals that come out at night. In addition to each poem, there is a sidebar that provides a brief factual description of the animal (or object) the poem is about. Teaching Extension:Use in a poetry unit, this is a great example of taking one's interest (the author loves the night) and developing poems about them, with a nonfiction aspect as well.
  • (5/5)
    Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful on every level: each poem is a delectable treat to be savored; the richly colored relief prints of Rick Allen complement the poems wonderfully; and the informational blocks on each page give fascinating tidbits about nocturnal life. This is a true celebration of a book.
  • (5/5)
    A stunningly illustrated, excellent collection of poems about creatures of the night
  • (4/5)
    Beautiful illustrations and I learned some fun facts about nighttime creatures. Sometimes I wonder who the audience of the book is, with the beautiful illustrations, poetry and facts, some of which are a tad complex. I'm sure it will find that audience though.
  • (5/5)
    Beautifully written and illustrated poems about nature in the dark of night.
  • (5/5)
    This delightful collection of poetry and prose explores the mysterious features and creatures of the night. Masterfully-crafted, lyrics bountiful in sound devices are accompanied by both rich ilustrations and prose providing the science behind the poetry. Use to learn science, or simply enjoy the rhythms of the verses.
  • (3/5)
    Poems of the night :)loved the factual information about the creature/thing that the poem was about.Fun to read
  • (2/5)
    This book is well illustrated, and has a great source of poetry and sing-songy children's tales.
  • (5/5)
    Genre: PoetrySummary: This book is a collection of short poems about the ways of the night time in the woods, and about the Dark Emperor horned owlMedia: Woodblock Painting
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed these poems more than my toddler, but he really enjoyed the illustrations of forest creatures preparing for the night's activities. This was a nice mix of poetry, wildlife information, and art.
  • (4/5)
    I was apprehensive at first about this selection because I can be picky about poetry. I have always been a bigger fan of poetry collections or "best of"-type samplings of famous works, versus a book of what has at times seemed like mumbo-jumbo nonsense words that some unknown writer thew on a page and was lucky enough to have published. I took a chance on Joyce Sidman and read "Dark Emporer," won over by the Newberry stamp on the back cover. But I HAVE to say that I really, really enjoyed it! With the turn of each page, Sidman imparts a story about some creature of the night (nocturnal animals, plants, etc) through various forms of poetry (ballads, forms of rhyming, prose, etc.) accompanied by beautifully detailed relief-print illustrations, and a short informational paragraph that explains the subject of the poem in a more scientific, straight-forward way. So, you get the poetry (some of Sidman's stuff is great, some is not so great), the exquisite and painstakingly detailed illustrations, and a little paragraph chock-full of fun, interesting facts, all about things in the night: bats, owls, mushrooms, spiders, crickets, etc. For instance, did you know that many types of mushrooms are named solely for their appearance or qualities? There are "tree ears" and "worm coral," but also "death cap" and "destroying angel," which are poisonous varieties. I absolutely love that she finishes the book with a short glossary of potentially unfamiliar words, including "ubi sunt," which is a style of medieval poetry that laments the loss of heroic, beautiful things. Who knew?I love that this book is so versatile. It could accompany a science lesson (life science, animals, ecosystems) or language arts (literature, poetry) or used for the illustrations, as an example of a unique art medium that most children probably aren't familiar with. It's full of potential for use in the classroom.
  • (5/5)
    The look of this Newbery-Honor winning book is deceptively simple. It is the size of a picture book. Instead of a linear story, however, the text is made up of poems tracing the course of night from dusk to dawn by focusing on varying aspects such as nocturnal animals, trees, and the moon. Each poem is on the left-hand side of the page, with a small illustration; a larger illustration fills most of the opposite page. On the far right of the illustration, in smaller font that could easily be ignored when reading to a younger or restless audience, is a short paragraph filled with fascinating tidbits about the subject of the poem.I confess I was so focused on the text - poetry and nonfiction - that I glossed over the illustrations at first. Then, I read about the process on the title page, which made me take a second look. The method used is relief printing, a process in which a drawing is transferred to wood. The wood is then carved, covered in ink, and printed onto paper. In order to create colorful prints as are in this book, this process of carving, inking, and printing must be done multiple times in multiple colors - and aligned perfectly. Think that sounds like a lot of work? Read on: "The prints for Dark Emperor were each printed from at least three blocks (and in some instances as many as six) and then hand-colored with strongly pigmented watercolor called gouache." Wow. And I had thought of them as fairly simple! I had to page through again, this time in awe of the amount of work it took to create each illustration. This is a truly lovingly crafted book of poetry, nonfiction, and illustration.
  • (5/5)
    Well deserving of its Newbery Honor status, this brilliant collection of poems uses apostrophe (the poet speaking to the subject) and mask (the speaker of the poem assuming the voice of the subject) to great effect. If any English teacher wants to study poetry and have students truly explore poetic elements of personification, alliteration, assonance, consonance, it's all here. Great link between poetry and nonfiction.
  • (4/5)
    A great non-fiction poetry book that deals with night animals. The poems are coupled with non-fictional text about the animals or organisms described in the poem. I have this in my classroom library.
  • (5/5)
    Outstanding prints illustrate this book of poetry in exploration of woodland creatures. Straight forward poems are coupled with a more scientific reflection of the images presented in the illustrations. Would be perfect for coupling with a science lesson focusing on biology, forest habitat and botany. Some concepts that are introduced range from photosynthesis to animal kingdoms. Illustrations do a lovely job of lending to the interconnectedness of the natural world.
  • (5/5)
    This fantastic book of poetry and non-fiction combined is wonderful and inspiring. The poems are well composed, lyric, and emotional, and each poem has a paragraph with information about the topic. For example, the poem Oak After Dark is about the life of an oak tree from its point of view, and the adjacent page has a paragraph about the various functions a tree servers. Each poem also has a wonderful illustrations, done in woodcuts and rendered in dark, deep colors of the night- midnight blue, deep green, black, etc.
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed this book. Allen’s prints are beautiful and well suited to a dark, nighttime ambiance. Sidman’s imagery is wonderful, she sets the stage with Welcome to the Night (The night’s a sea of dappled dark/the night’s a feast of sound and spark). After that each poem is from the perspective of a different creature or aspect of nighttime and has a unique style. Styles include concrete poetry (Dark Emperor is in the shape of an owl and a mouse), a ballad (Ballad of the Wandering Eft), and an Ubi Sunt (Moon’s Lament). Accompanying each poem and print is an informational paragraph about the topic discussed in the poem including information on a number of sciences including, biology, ecology, mycology and astronomy
  • (3/5)
    Beautiful pictures and well written nature poetry. I also liked the information on each page that talks about the animals.
  • (3/5)
    This book of poetry is set up so beautifully. Each two page spread has the same format: a poem on the left, a small illustration of a newt in the bottom left of the page that includes or somehow references the creature featured in the poem and the left page includes a large illustration taking up most of the page showing the nocturnal (or diurnal) creature in it's natural habitat and a column of text that offers further background information on the featured creature. I actually learned a lot of interesting facts that I never thought about before. The individual poems all fit the individual creatures themselves. Some are a little funny, a little scary and a little sad, but to me this book was so much more then the text. It really felt like it was all about how the whole book worked together to create an experience.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed most of the poems in this collection of children's poems that focuses primarily on creatures of the night. A couple did not resonate with me at all. While I can understand why the illustrations in the book made it a Caldecott honor book, they are not illustrations in a color palette that really appeals to me. The poems are written at a level that early middle schoolers and even advanced elementary readers can enjoy. The text discussing the poem's focus is not always written at an age-appropriate level to accompany the poem. Some vocabulary terms are things with which even upper middle schoolers may not be familiar. One or two are defined in the accompanying text, and a glossary of terms does appear in the back. I think children who are fascinated by nature and by night will enjoy the book.
  • (5/5)
    A mysterious and enchanting book of poems of species that roam the night. The reader is able to explore the nocturnal creatures the run the woods.The poetry in this book is creative and whimsical. I love how this a book of poems of nocturnal animals. The night time is a mysterious and forbidden time for children, in which the reader is able to feel a mysterious essence as they read about the wood's night life.A great book of poetry to share with students to study nocturnal species. I love the concept of this book connecting English Language Arts and science.
  • (4/5)
    As a whole I truly enjoy the art of poetry. Finding the unique thing about each poem is something that makes reading it more fun. The Dark Emperor was one of the most fascinating books that I have read. When I first heard what the book was about I questioned that it would be able to have a whole book on night animal poems, but I was wrong. There were several things that I really liked about this book. The first thing would be the illustrations. They truly captured my attention and were definitely a reason that I enjoyed the book as much as I did. I really love when the text is off to the side and the image takes up both of the pages. This is exactly what this book did. In poetry the words are setting a mood and making you feel something. Having the images be so large and in so much detail helped reader to form the image in their mind of what the author wanted them to see. I enjoyed that there were facts about the different animal being discussed in the poem. I think that it helped the book to have purpose and meaning. When you read a poem you only have so many lines to learn about the animal, but when you have that extra information you are able to learn something and feel like there was a purpose to reading the poem. The raccoon was one of the ones we read about in class after reading the poem and then reading the facts I felt that I actually learned something about the raccoon and enjoyed doing it. Finally I love when the author forms their poem in the shape of the meaning. It is a fun artistic characteristic to writing and it gives the poem a little something extra. In this book it was the poem about the owl. The words in the poem were already so powerful and then the poem was in the shape of the owl, which made the poem have an even stronger sense of emotion. The overall message of the book was all about the night animals. I think that this was a very unique central idea to take on and I think that the author truly did an amazing job at giving all these animals a unique poem that held true to their characteristics.
  • (4/5)
    I found this poetry book to be very interesting and engaging. My favorite aspect of the book is that certain poems are formed to be in the shape of what they are about. For example, the poem, Dark Emperor, is about owls. The words of the poem are shaped in such a way that the poem resembles an owl. This sets the book apart from other poetry books and makes it exciting and different. I also like the informational sections that are included in the book. The theme of each poem surrounds an animal or plant. Next to each poem, there is an informational section about the animal or plant that is highlighted. Information about owls is placed next to the Dark Emperor poem. This adds another dimension and element of interest to a simple poetry book. The big idea of this story is to highlight a variety of plants and animals.
  • (5/5)
    Dark Emperor and Other Poems of the Night by Joyce Sidman (and these gorgeous woodcuts are done by Rick Allen) is just a sight to behold. Wonderful poems and the absolutely wonderful accompanying woodcut prints, which capture the wild shadows and the “dappled dark” just perfectly.




  • (5/5)
    Again, a lovely book full of poems and explanations about creatures, this time nocturnal woodland animals. Too wordy to read aloud as is, but ripe for plucking bits from for appropriate lessons.
  • (3/5)
    Although I enjoyed this book of nonfiction/poetry, I liked "The Song of the Water Boatman" more. My favorite poem in he book was "Snail at Moonrise." Sidman includes a glossary of terms in this book as well. The illustrations in this book were beautiful. This was the illustrator's, Rick Allen, first book.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this poem, “Welcome to The Night” mainly for two reasons. This poem was about different senses around the night. One reason I liked the poem was because of its elements. This poem rhymed, and the illustrations were very detailed. It truly expresses how night looks and how it’s supposed to make you feel. Since the poem highlighted raccoons, there was information about them on the side of the page, which is another reason why I liked this poem. This can be helpful for children readers because if they had a question about raccoons, or just wanted to know more about them, they could just look at the information on the side and find out for themselves. The big idea of this poem was what the night feels like, especially to animals. It was to enlighten its readers of the smell, look, and feel of nighttime.
  • (4/5)
    The book of poems begins with a beautiful depiction of sunset in the woods. All the poems are about animals of the night and what happens after sunset. Each poem is a two page spread with a beautiful picture and facts about the animal the poem was about. Sidman uses a variety of rhyming schemes. She uses many different styles of writing my favorite one was about the owl, it was a concrete poem with the words in the shape of an owl. The book ends with a two page spread of sunrise.This book is just brilliant. Good use to introduce children to poetry. I would recommend for grades 1-4.