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Horseman, Pass By

Horseman, Pass By

Escrito por Larry McMurtry

Narrado por Kerin McCue


Horseman, Pass By

Escrito por Larry McMurtry

Narrado por Kerin McCue

valoraciones:
4/5 (10 valoraciones)
Longitud:
7 horas
Publicado:
Jan 1, 1992
ISBN:
9781449861025
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

In addition to his 29 books, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Larry McMurtry is credited on dozens of screenplays—including the Academy Award-winning Brokeback Mountain. Horseman, Pass By is a post-World War II classic first published in 1961 and later made into a feature film. Cattleman Homer Bannon is a walking advertisement for traditional, old-frontier morals—in contrast to his stepson, Hud. Homer’s grandson Lonnie is torn between emotions for his father and grandfather as he struggles to define his own identity.
Publicado:
Jan 1, 1992
ISBN:
9781449861025
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor

Larry McMurtry (1936–2021) was the author of twenty-nine novels, including the Pulitzer Prize–winning Lonesome Dove, three memoirs, two collections of essays, and more than thirty screenplays. He lived in Archer City, Texas.

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4.2
10 valoraciones / 7 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    Horseman, Pass By : A Novel is Larry McMurtry's first novel. A fiction rich with setting of the Texas panhandle. Life on a large cattle ranch. Geography of scrub grass, mesquite, cows and horses. It offers a wonderful feeling of that West which I love. A stellar first novel. I encourage you to read it ,especially if you like that setting.
  • (5/5)
    American Literature of the finest sort. When the three page epilogue is a perfect short story by itself you know you've read something special.
  • (5/5)
    I’m not a Western fan, folks, but the last few Westerns I’ve read, including this one, have gone straight to the top of my Best Books Read list. Oh my. And I swear to you that not only do I not like Westerns, I am not a lover of horses or guns either, so how-in-the-world has this happened?What a story. What a writer. What a great book. Even if it is a Western.
  • (4/5)
    I started this on the train back from Portland, and was immediately drawn in by the characters. I'll have to watch "Hud" after finishing the novel.
  • (4/5)
    I've seen the movie Hud so many times that it probably colored my perception of this book too much while I was reading it, and I'm sure I would have enjoyed Horseman, Pass By more if I had never seen the movie which was adapted from it; that said, I still enjoyed it a great deal. McMurtry's a terrific writer and his concise yet often aridly poetic prose captures the feel of coming of age in a small western town in the mid-20th century perfectly.Those who come to the book after having seen the movie will probably be shocked by the book's portrayal of the Hud character. In the movie, the titular character of Hud is a charming, likable (no doubt the benefit of being portrayed by the charismatic Paul Newman), although entirely self-interested rapscallion. In Horseman, Hud is something closer to a sociopath--a charming cad, still, but colder, more vicious, and even more indifferent to the feelings of other human beings. It makes the character as portrayed in the book a lot harder to take, but like the movie, the book isn't really about Hud so much as it is about Lonnie, and his Granddad, and their relationship to each other and to the changing West.I highly recommend both the book and the movie, but I have to admit that as fine as Horseman, Pass By is, the images from Hud are what is going to stick with me.
  • (4/5)
    This was the first McMurtry book that I read and I believe that it was quite good, despite my reluctance to read westerns. McMurtry's style was much more down to earth than say Lamour or Hillerman. His writing portrayed the prairie in a desolate way but also showed that it was full of life. He also did a great job of showing how frustrating and confusing it would be as a teenager, an pseudo orphan even, growing up on the outskirts of middle of nowhere town. The narration of Lonnie was very similar to what I remember as a teenager at that age. The most moving passages to me in the book had to deal with the Grandfather and his feelings about the ranch. Also, the slaughter of the infected cattle. There were very few overdone stereotypes or exaggerations of cliche scenes. I think I will be reading more of his work.
  • (3/5)
    This one is not necessarily my cup of tea, but I could see how Larry McMurtry is loved by many. That said, I kept expecting it to turn into Shane. And I'm wondering how the movie based on this book is named after its least likable character.