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Las alegres comadres de Windor

Las alegres comadres de Windor

Escrito por William Shakespeare

Narrado por Jose Díaz


Las alegres comadres de Windor

Escrito por William Shakespeare

Narrado por Jose Díaz

valoraciones:
4/5 (22 valoraciones)
Longitud:
44 minutos
Publicado:
1 ene 2015
ISBN:
9788416135639
Formato:

Descripción

Falstaff es una mole de humanidad que se considera un caballero, pero que en realidad es un sinvergüenza y un ladrón. Convencido de su elegancia y apostura, cree que le será fácil cortejar a dos de las mujeres de los hombres más ricos de la ciudad, las señoras Ford y Page, para, a través de ellas, acceder a las riquezas de sus maridos.

Ante las insinuaciones que por carta reciben ambas señoras, deciden darle a Falstaff una lección que no olvidará. A su vez el señor Ford, que es un celoso compulsivo, se entera de las intenciones de Falstaff; decide entonces disfrazarse y, bajo el nombre de Brooke, ver cuál será la respuesta de su mujer a las pretensiones de Falstaff.

- See more at: http://www.sonolibro.com/audiolibros/william-shakespeare/las-alegres-comadres-de-windsor#sthash.9AceDno0.dpuf
Publicado:
1 ene 2015
ISBN:
9788416135639
Formato:

Sobre el autor

William Shakespeare war ein englischer Dramatiker, Lyriker und Schauspieler. Seine Komödien und Tragödien gehören zu den bedeutendsten Bühnenstücken der Weltliteratur und sind die am häufigsten aufgeführten und verfilmten.


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4.2
22 valoraciones / 8 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    Es una divertida historia acerca de cómo dos esposas le gastan bromas a un hombre qué quiere provecharse dé su dinero.
  • (5/5)
    Muy buena y divertida trama, una excelente interpretación, magnífque. .
  • (5/5)
    Muy divertido, me gustó lo fluido y la narrativa también
  • (3/5)
    Well, behold the man. The Falstaff who whooped it up with Prince Hal is to the Falstaff of The Merry Wives of Windsor as one like unto an ancestor-god, even if it's the latter wearing Herne horns. From history's greates Lusty Fool, in a near-tie with Li Po, to a foolhardy lustbucket in a buckbasket. And okay, we all diminish with time (I suddenly imagine the 15th-century Sir John as a seminal founder, a literal ancestor of his 17th-century counterpart), and it's a play where the women get the better of the men, so that makes his buffoonery appro, but it's still leavened with that little bit of tin-eared nasty where you just don't want him to tell the story about the stripper who wouldn't take her bottoms off and didn't get no tip.And the other men are thin gruel, and the women are better, especially Mistress Quikly, but you don't want to forgive them for thinking up that amazing scene where the children dress as fairies and then not coming to life and honeytonguing the playwright into writing what would have obviously been the best scene in all of shakespeare, the one where the Elizabbethan children get ready to play Elizabethan Peter Pans.All in all it's a confection, evidently one fit for a (Virgin) Queen, since the mythology says she commissioned it, but one that leaves a weird flat taste on the modern palate, like one of those early modern pies with cloves squab and a loaf of bread and verjuice in it. Oh, but I'd take three friends to see Sir Hugh Evans and Dr. Caius are Dead.
  • (4/5)
    I adore Shakespeare. I’ve read at least half of his works. I’ve seen dozens of his plays performed. In college I took a class completely devoted to learning how to read and interpret his writing. I’ve visited the Globe in England and every time I read a new play of his I find a new reason to love his work.His writing isn’t perfect. He ripped story lines from others and his plays can be repetitive. He can be long-winded when he wants to, but all-in-all, there’s more brilliance than hot air there. When Shakespeare ran out of words to express what he was feeling, he invented them! That’s just amazing. Not only did he invent words, but they are ones that stuck and that we still use today. I love his wit. He was incredibly funny. Many of his jokes were topical, so they aren’t nearly as amusing to us as they were to audiences that lived during his lifespan. It’s like someone watching an episode of Saturday Night Live from 30 years ago and expecting to catch every joke from the weekend update. On to the The Merry Wives of Windsor. This isn’t my favorite play, it isn’t even my favorite comedy by the Bard, but it is entertaining. It’s well-known purely because it brought back a fan-favorite, Sir John Falstaff (from the Henry IV history plays). The basic plot is as follows, that well-loved pompous old fool, Falstaff, decides to seduce two of the married ladies in the town of Windsor. The confusion that ensues is almost like a French farce. People run in, doors slam, identities are mistaken, etc. In other words, good times. Always the idiot, Falstaff makes the mistake of wooing two women who happen to be best friends. Mistress Ford and Mistress Page both receive love letter from the fat knight and devise a plan to trap and mock him. Mistress Ford’s husband ends up as collateral damage when he’s led to believe his wife is actually cheating on him. What sets this play apart from his many others is the fact that it’s the only one set in contemporary (for Shakespeare) England. Most of his other plays either took place in the past or in another country. The subplot involves a husband and wife (the Pages) who are trying to marry their daughter off to men she doesn't love. The clever daughter evades her parents' wishes by coming up with a tricky solution of her own to get the man she truly loves. If you're new to Shakespeare, see it live first! It's a play, it was meant to be seen and not just read. Once you've done that, explore the beauty of his writing. Much Ado About Nothing is a great place to start in the comedies and Hamlet remains my favorite tragedy... so far. ---One side note, if you’re looking for a definitive edition of Shakespeare, I would highly recommend the The Riverside Shakespeare. It is massive (like five inches thick), but I love it.
  • (4/5)
    “The Merry Wives of Windsor” centers on John Falstaff as he tries to court Mistress Page and Mistress Ford in an effort to receive compensation. Meanwhile, Mistress Page is being courted by two other men. Mistress Page and Mistress Ford team up to shame Falstaff for his deceit, which produces comical results.“Merry Wives” is one of Shakespeare’s denser plays, yet it is unique in that it portrays middle class English folk in way that Shakespeare does not use in any of his other plays. I highly recommend pairing the reading of this play with watching a live performance of it, because it definitely helps with comprehension of the complex plot.
  • (3/5)
    I really enjoyed this tale. The wives are my heroes and I thought the interplay between them and their husbands was honest and hilarious. I loved that they were not taken in for a minute by Falstaff's flattery. It truly is a very respectful view of women and their intelligence, I wish more modern authors had that respect.
  • (4/5)
    I found this the most difficult of the comedies to read (lots of vernacular). Get a good edition with proper footnotes (endnotes would be cumbersome for this one).