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Dagon

Dagon

Escrito por H.P. Lovecraft

Narrado por Jose Díaz


Dagon

Escrito por H.P. Lovecraft

Narrado por Jose Díaz

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (40 valoraciones)
Longitud:
16 minutos
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2015
ISBN:
9788417021061
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Nuestro protagonista es un adicto a las drogas, dominado por ideas suicidas desde un incidente que le ocurrió durante la guerra, cuando era oficial de la Marina mercante.

Cuando su barco iba ser capturado por los alemanes, consiguió escapar en una lancha salvavidas. Navegó a la deriva durante varios días, hasta que encalló en una especie de tierra, que era negra hasta donde alcanzaba la vista. Había allí toda clase de seres indescriptibles. El marino imaginó que aquello debía ser una continuación del suelo del océano, que, por obra de alguna erupción volcánica, había sido expuesta a la superficie.

Andando por la isla, después de unos días encontró una gran piedra blanca de carácter monolítico, que parecía hecha por la mano del hombre...

Interpretado por: Jose D.
- See more at: http://www.sonolibro.com/audiolibros/h-p-lovecraft/dagon#sthash.g4grj9Wt.dpuf
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2015
ISBN:
9788417021061
Formato:
Audiolibro

Sobre el autor

Renowned as one of the great horror-writers of all time, H.P. Lovecraft was born in 1890 and lived most of his life in Providence, Rhode Island. Among his many classic horror stories, many of which were published in book form only after his death in 1937, are ‘At the Mountains of Madness and Other Novels of Terror’ (1964), ‘Dagon and Other Macabre Tales’ (1965), and ‘The Horror in the Museum and Other Revisions’ (1970).


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4.7
40 valoraciones / 4 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    Quedé hipnotizada desde el primer segundo, me encantó, agradezco al autor y al intérprete
  • (4/5)
    Muy buen relato y excelente interpretación del lector / locutor!
  • (5/5)
    Fantástico! Me encantó muy realista y como siempre Lovecraft es exquisito
  • (4/5)
    The ancient house has always been there, and people say One dwells therein who talks with the morning mists that come up from the deep, and perhaps sees singular things oceanward at those times when the cliff’s rim becomes the rim of all earth, and solemn buoys toll free in the white aether of faery. This they tell from hearsay, for that forbidding crag is always unvisited, and natives dislike to train telescopes on it. Summer boarders have indeed scanned it with jaunty binoculars, but have never seen more than the grey primeval roof, peaked and shingled, whose eaves come nearly to the grey foundations, and the dim yellow light of the little windows peeping out from under those eaves in the dusk. These summer people do not believe that the same One has lived in the ancient house for hundreds of years, but cannot prove their heresy to any real Kingsporter. This volume includes a lot of Lovecraft's shorter stories, plus some of his earliest stories and unfinished fragments. My favourite stories include "The Strange High House in the Mist", which is extremely spooky and atmospheric without being frightening, and The Moon-bog which warns anyone who makes a lot of money not under any circumstances to buy their ancestral home and decided to renovate it. that never ends well. At the other end of the spectrum is "The Horror at Red Hook" which is rather unpleasant. The last ninety pages are taken up by Lovecraft's essay, "Supernatural Horror in Literature", which covers the history of supernatural literature from its roots in myths and legend, through the Gothic novels of the late 18th century, and ending with Arthur Machen and M. R. James. Lovecraft manages to be insulting about practically every author he mentions, even those whose work he rates highly, such as Edgar Allen Poe whose "pretence to profound and obscure scholarship, his blundering ventures in stilted and laboured pseudo-humor, and his often vitriolic outbursts of critical prejudice must all be recognized and forgiven", and mocks Lord Lytton's "amusingly serious occult studies".Lovecraft doesn't seem worried about spoiling the end of the stories he mentions, but having read the essay I now have plenty more books and stories to add to my wish list.