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Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place, The: Book V

Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place, The: Book V

Escrito por Maryrose Wood

Narrado por Katherine Kellgren


Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place, The: Book V

Escrito por Maryrose Wood

Narrado por Katherine Kellgren

valoraciones:
4/5 (80 valoraciones)
Longitud:
9 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Apr 21, 2015
ISBN:
9780062397935
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

For fans of Lemony Snicket's Series of Unfortunate Events and Trenton Lee Stewart's Mysterious Benedict Society, here comes the fifth book in the Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place, the acclaimed and hilarious Victorian mystery series by Maryrose Wood.

Lord Fredrick Ashton may not feel ready to be a father, but with a little Ashton on the way, he's sure about one thing: The wolfish curse on his family must end soon, before the child is born. Penelope willingly takes on the challenge; when Lady Constance's doctor prescribes a seaside holiday, Penelope jumps at the chance to take the three Incorrigible children to Brighton, where she hopes to persuade the old sailor Pudge to reveal what he knows about the Ashton curse.

But the Ashtons are not the only ones at the beach in January. The passionately temperamental Babushkinov family is also taking the winter waters. The Incorrigible children may have been raised by wolves, but the Babushkinov children are the wildest creatures they've ever seen. Is it more than mere coincidence that these untamed children have turned up in Brighton just as Penelope and the Incorrigibles arrive?

Editorial:
Publicado:
Apr 21, 2015
ISBN:
9780062397935
Formato:
Audiolibro

Sobre el autor

Maryrose Wood is the author of the first five books (so far!) in this series about the Incorrigible children and their governess. These books may be considered works of fiction, which is to say, the true bits and the untrue bits are so thoroughly mixed together that no one should be able to tell the difference. This process of fabrication is fully permitted under the terms of the author's Poetic License, which is one of her most prized possessions. Maryrose's other qualifications for writing these tales include a scandalous stint as a professional thespian, many years as a private governess to two curious and occasionally rambunctious pupils, and whatever literary insights she may have gleaned from living in close proximity to a clever but disobedient dog.


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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
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  • (5/5)
    Too good to pass. I look forward to the end.
  • (4/5)
    We listened to this on audiobook, and it was a favorite with the whole family. Hilarious writing and fantastic narration. I knocked off one star because I don't like cliffhanger endings.
  • (4/5)
    A charming, whimsical, and intriguing start to a new series. Jane Eyre meets Lemony Snicket.
  • (5/5)
    So I started off thinking this was an amusing children's book but that I would not be likely to continue with the series. WRONG, I must know why is her hair red, what's up with Lord Frederick, will the children be okay...
    I really enjoyed the whole book!
  • (5/5)
    Such a fun and delightful book! I adored it.
  • (4/5)
    Wonderful and very fun little story and excellent storytelling. I love the rhythm of the prose and the structure with her frequent and humorous little back references to things from a couple pages earlier.
    I'm having a little more trouble than I expected finding the next one and I'm anxious.
  • (4/5)
    At age 15, Miss Penelope Lumley, recently graduated from the Swanburne Academy for Poor Bright Females, is on her way to her first position as a governess. When she arrives at Ashton Place, she is shocked to learn that her young charges have been raised by wolves!It's hard to describe this story without making it sound silly. It is silly, but it's also cleverly poking fun at tropes in children's literature and it's an entertaining story whether you catch the references or not. Because of this, it works well as a story for both children and adults to read - if it's your first story about wild children and governesses, great, and if it's not, you'll chuckle along with the narrator even more knowledgeably. It's smart without feeling didactic; I was amused by the explanations of irony, for example, and the use of poetry was fun without feeling forced. I'd be hard-pressed to tell you if I preferred the audio or the book, since the former is superbly read by Katherine Kellgren, while the latter includes illustrations from Caldecott Award-winning illustrator Jon Klassen.
  • (5/5)
    I don't care if it's meant for children. What could be more delightful than the inimitable Katherine Kellgren reading the audio version of a story that's part Series of Unfortunate Events (orphans, complex words, adult humor) and part Julie Andrews' Mary Poppins (plucky governess, manners, eternal optimism, scatter-brained lord and lady) but with a dash of its own uniqueness? For these orphans are no ordinary orphans - they were raised by wolves! And, since there are three children of differing ages, a person (and by that I mean, 15-year-old governess Penelope Lumley) must wonder exactly *how* they came to be raised by wolves and if they can ever be taught to behave as children. Absolutely entertaining on audio.
  • (5/5)
    Oh what fun this book was! Miss Penelope Lumley is hired as a governess to 3 very unusual children, said children were found in the wild and had been raised by wolves and Penelope has only a short time to make them presentable in a social setting, a party to be exact and when Miss Lumley exaggerates their progress to the lady of the house well you can be sure that all will not go smoothly.I enjoyed the first book in this middle grade series so much that I will be starting book 2 immediately. I liked the character of Penelope I thought she was strong and resourceful. The children are more intelligent than the family gives them credit for yet are still pretty wild which makes for a whole lot of fun and adventure. There is also a bit of mystery and some secrets in this house, like who is to blame for the scene at the Christmas party? What is the creepy coachman Timothy up to? Will Lady Constance really put the children out? This is why I must continue reading right away so many questions need answers and so many adventures to be had. I am hoping that we get to know the children as individuals in the books to come; I was taken with Cassiopeia but would like to learn more about the boys.I am already a huge fan of Katherine Kellgren so not surprisingly her narration of this book was fabulous but she never ceases to amaze me with what she can get her voice to do, in this one she has to give these children a wolfish quality to their voices when they are speaking to others and a wolf language all their own when they are speaking to each other, she pulls it off perfectly. Every single character is defined and you never have to guess who is talking.I highly recommend this series (yes I know I’ve only read book one but it is so fun!). I would recommend it on audio I think this would make for a fabulous family road trip listen.4 ½ Stars
  • (4/5)
    Great story with all the elements to keep kids reading. Loved the idea and the governess character.
  • (3/5)
    After finding three children apparently raised by wolves on his property, Lord Ashton hires Penelope Lumley to be their governess. While the job is not exactly what she expected, 15 year old Penelope does her best to tutor her new charges in manners as well as academics. Where did the children come from? Who set up the terrible occurrences at the Christmans party, and what were they trying to cause?
  • (2/5)
    A fifteen year old becomes the governess at a strange and mysterious manor. Her charges are three children found living among the wolves; she civilizes them while trying to puzzle out her boss's motives.

    Too young for me to enjoy, but a nice read if you've been missing the Lemony Snicket series.
  • (2/5)
    This series has been compared to Lemony Snicket's Series of Unfortunate Events, and that comparison is very true, in my opinion. Unfortunately, I didn't like Lemony Snicket's series, so I wish I had read that comparison before I started this book. Most of the characters in the book were very flat. There was a huge mysterious buildup as to who the orphan children really are, but unfortunately, little resolution was given to the end of the story. One major event was resolved (the Christmas Party), but everything else was pushed off to the next book in the series. I don't mind cliffhangers, but I would like something to hold me until I get to the next book. I was left with nothing on this one. Slightly disappointing.
  • (5/5)
    I listened to the audio version of this book, first I have to say that Katherine Kellgren was an excellent narrator, she made the narration very enjoyable.

    This first installment of The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place was great! The writing style reminded me a bit of Lemony Snicket and his Series of Unfortunate Events, but that’s the extent of the familiarity.

    Maryrose Wood’s story has the usual gothic novel feel, a young governess, Miss Penelope Lumley (reminiscent of Jane Eyre), is hired to look after Alexander, Cassiopeia and Beowulf in a mansion that seemed filled with mysteries. The children have a very peculiar condition and the master of the house seem to have a secret himself.

    The pacing of this novel is perfect, the story has quite a few humorous bits and it was difficult to not fall instantly in love with Alexander, Cassiopeia and Beowulf. They were intelligent and cared for each other and with the help of Miss Lumley they worked hard to assimilate to their new environment in Ashton Place.

    This is a great read for families and a book that adults will enjoy as much as children. If you’re a fan of the Lemony Sincket series, this is the book for you.
  • (5/5)
    After completing her education at the Swanburne Academy for Poor Bright Females, 15-year-old Penelope Lumley accepts a post as governess at Ashton Place. The intrepid governess is not daunted upon learning that her three charges have just been captured in the woods where they have been living in the wild. Miss Lumley simply adds instruction in personal grooming, wearing clothing, and speaking to her curriculum of mathematics, geography, language, and literature (with occasional distractions from squirrels). Miss Lumley's skills will soon be put to the test when the lady of the house decides to host a Christmas party with the children in attendance.Katherine Kellgren's narration further enhances an already delightful fairytale-like story. All of her characterizations are outstanding, but I particularly enjoyed hearing the children's voices as they struggled with human speech. Readers should be forewarned that the story ends with a cliff-hanger. I'm eager to get my hands on the next book in the series, and it will have to be the audio version now I that I know how good it is in that format.
  • (4/5)
    Thank you, Marla, for this wonderful birthday gift :)

    I am a fan of Klassen's art, which is why this book had attracted my attention in the first place. After reading Connie Willis's 1,200plus-page epic that revolves around two really insufferable incorrigible children, I figured, hey, why not keep it going? Though I must admit, the Incorrigibles are nothing compared to Alf and Binnie; in fact, we learn pretty quickly that they are smart, funny, and impressively obedient. Mysteries are galore in this little books. Some are more obvious than others, but all will have to wait until I read the next book in the series.

    Apart from some writing elements, I really do not think this book is anything like Lemony Snicket. The main character of this book is Penelope, a young governess fresh out of school, not the children (I would humbly propose...)

    A page turner for anyone who likes fast squirrel chases and hates wallpaper!
  • (5/5)
    It's perfect, I love it! I love the illustrations too and I am glad to say I recognized the illustrator in another book. I'm so proud :)
  • (4/5)
    Now there was a good bit of fun! I'm not a frequent reader of YA novels, but I do enjoy them once in a while, and this one turned out to be a real treat. Fifteen year-old Penelope Lumley, just graduated from the Swanburne Academy for Poor Bright Females sometime in the mid 19th century, is on her way to her first job interview as a potential governess. The employers had asked for someone who gets along with animals, and as it happens she is a great animal lover and is very much looking forward to finding out what sort of creatures she will find at her potential employers'. When she arrives at Ashton place with some trepidation, not being sure whether she will be able to call this place her home or be sent away, she is greeted with mysterious howling sounds, which everyone in the estate seems to be at pains not to hear. But inevitably, she is hired and comes face to face with her charges; three young siblings, two boys and a small girl, who have grown up wild in the local woods, seemingly having been raised by wolves. Her mandate of teaching them French and Latin and Geography and Mathematics, will also have to include teaching them first to start talking like human beings and (for the boys) how to properly put a pair of pants on. The children are very attached to her and she's delighted with their progress, though of course a big challenge is thrown her way; she must groom them to behave irreproachably and in very short order, to be the main attraction at a grand Christmas ball to which high dignitaries and the crème de la crème of society will be invited, and this when the children are still barely able to contain themselves from howling at the least provocation! Elements of Jane Eyre come into play when some of the mysterious howlings seemingly turn out to originate from a hidden portion of the attic. But the secret of this strange mystery will only be revealed in a further instalment in the series it seems, which is just as well because I will happily continue to follow along the adventures of Miss Lumley and the Incorrigibles.
  • (4/5)
    The 5th book of this series just came out, and I finally got around to reading the first one. I really enjoyed it; it is smart, funny, engaging and quirky. With a lexile level of 1000 and an AR level of 6.8, this is a great book for those middle grade students who need a higher reading level without some of the YA content. It contains many pearls of wisdom from the inimitable Agatha Swanburne, not to mention our young governess-heroine Penelope. There are quotes from literature, and even some Latin phrases thrown in for good measure. With that being said, you might assume this is one of those books that adults love but middle graders don't like. However, I have several students who love this series. This would be a good family read-aloud, or a road trip book. I understand the narrarator is fabulous. There are a lot of mysteries left unexplained, so be ready to start the next one quickly
  • (4/5)
    Fun and quick read about 3 children found in the woods & their "civilizing" by the 15-year-old narrator who has been hired to be their governess.
  • (4/5)
    Fifteen-year-old Penelope Lumley is hired to be a governess for a trio of feral children discovered in Lord Fredrick's vast, forested land. Penelope is proper and efficient in bringing the children along to a semblance of civility but there are hints and shadows of people's intentions not being quite right when it comes to the children's welfare. Thus sets the scene for this new series that could be a cousin to the Series of Unfortunate Events books. The narrator's tone is pert, brisk and practical with just a hint of winking humor. A great choice for a read-aloud and quite suitable for gifted readers.
  • (4/5)
    The Mysterious Howling is absolutely hilarious! This audio book is narrated by Katherine Kellgren who also reads the Bloody Jack audio books. In this first installment of the Incorrigible Children the reader is introduced to the young residents of Ashton Place who have literally been raised by wolves. Luckily, they have resourceful and plucky young Swanburne Academy graduate, Miss Penelope Lumley, as their new governess. Prepare to laugh out loud at the antics of Miss Lumley and her young charges. I'm sure the book is fun to read in print format as well but the vocal performance of Katherine Kellgren adds to the hilarity of the story. Looking forward to the next volume in this series. 4 stars
  • (5/5)
    It takes a talented writer to craft the perfect MG book, and Wood has done just that. This hearkens back to those timeless children's books that everyone has read and fell in love with. And to make it even better, Katherine Kellgren has the perfect narration style.
  • (3/5)
    Not bad, but the plot didn't contain too much detail, and it seemed that a lot of the humor came from literary references that an age-appropriate audience wouldn't understand/find funny if they did (in fact, a lot of adults probably wouldn't find the governess/Victorian humor all that amusing either, unless they have a soft spot for Austen and the Brontes).
  • (4/5)
    The audiobook format made this book for me. I found it very engaging and entertaining. I don't know that I would have enjoyed reading the story nearly as much. Penelope Lumley is hired as a governess at Ashton Place, a wealthy estate in the 1800s. The Ashtons have recently found three feral children who appeared to be raised by wolves. Ms. Lumley takes her job seriously and takes on the challenge of teaching the children English and social graces. At the Christmas party, the children make their big debut and things go spectacularly awry. There are many unaswered questions and the book leaves them hanging for the sequel. A narrator tells the story and does frequent asides to readers about the action and to explain vocabulary, events of the day.
  • (4/5)
    - Audiobook - Penelope Lumley graduates from Swanburne Academy for Poor Bright Females and gets a (suspicious, to the reader's eyes) job as a governess to a very rich family. It turns out that her three pupils don't actually belong to the rich family, they're just three feral children that Lord Ashton found in the forest. Extremely suspicious.Penelope is a kind, smart, resourceful, poised, and generally likeable main character. She's particularly relatable for us readers, as she solves most of her problems by remembering things she has read in books.The book was very cute, but confusingly short. There's no real resolution, nor a cliffhanger, the story just stops like it's the end of a chapter. Ah well. I'll probably listen to the next in the series soon.
  • (4/5)
    This delightful cross between Jane Austen and Lemony Snickett may not appeal to all kids, but will certainly be appreciated by those who enjoy dry British humor (although author Maryrose Wood is actually a New Yorker and not a Brit). This opening story of 15-year-old governess Penelope Lumley and her three charges sets the stage for many further adventures. Although the three siblings in Miss Lumley's care have been raised by wolves and only recently brought into the "civilized" world, it quickly becomes clear that a mansion and nice clothes do not a civilized society make, and that the children are not the true beasts of this tale.
  • (5/5)
    Give yourself an afternoon to be transported to another time and place and a story with some rather bizarre twists. The ending is rather abrupt assuring a sequel or two. The novel works on multiple levels and I am ever hopeful that readers will want to explore further the referenced historical people and events. A delightful read!
  • (3/5)
    I'm torn!! Three or four stars!! I feel overall I'm too easy on books and give out too many four stars when later I go back over and think, that wasn't a four star book.
    My issues, too advanced for the age group. Although there are those superstar kids out there who like books that are advanced I'm not sure this works. The literary illusions, the Regency setting, some of the conventions, all these elements require a backgroud I'm not sure that many 10 year olds know about.
    That said very well written, entertaining, and a very clever design.
    I just talked myself into three stars. Maybe the next book will blow me away.

    "This is called progress, and there is no stopping it, so it must be cheerfully borne." - pg 100