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The Glass Kitchen: A Novel of Sisters

The Glass Kitchen: A Novel of Sisters

Escrito por Linda Francis Lee

Narrado por Julia Whelan


The Glass Kitchen: A Novel of Sisters

Escrito por Linda Francis Lee

Narrado por Julia Whelan

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (101 valoraciones)
Longitud:
10 horas
Publicado:
Jun 17, 2014
ISBN:
9781491530443
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Three sisters move from Texas to New York City to open a restaurant in this novel about food, family, and finding true love from the author of Emily & Einstein.

Portia Cuthcart never intended to leave Texas. Her dream was to run the Glass Kitchen restaurant her grandmother built decades ago. But after a string of betrayals and the loss of her legacy, Portia is determined to start a new life with her sisters in Manhattan…and never cook again. But when she moves into a dilapidated brownstone on the Upper West Side, she meets twelve-year-old Ariel and her widowed father Gabriel, a man with his hands full trying to raise two daughters on his own. Soon, a promise made to her sisters forces Portia back into a world of magical food and swirling emotions, where she must confront everything she has been running from. What seems so simple on the surface is anything but when long-held secrets are revealed, rivalries exposed, and the promise of new love stirs to life like chocolate mixing with cream.

Publicado:
Jun 17, 2014
ISBN:
9781491530443
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor

LINDA FRANCIS LEE is a native Texan now living on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, steps from the Dakota Apartment Building. Linda's writing career began in college when she published her first article. But after graduating she was sidetracked from writing when she was offered a job teaching probability and statistics. Later she found her way back to her first love, and the Atlanta Journal Constitution called her breakout novel, Blue Waltz, "absolutely stunning." Now the author of more than twenty books that are published in sixteen countries around the world, when Linda isn't writing she loves to run in Central Park and spend time with her husband, family, and friends.

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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    You know you loved a book when you are so sad that the book ended!
    This was a fun, light story of the many facets of love and forgiveness, sprinkled with a little bit of magic. Add in the food and this book had me hooked! I actually miss the characters. A great read for someone who is looking to relax and enjoy a wonderfully sweet story.
  • (4/5)
    Portia Cuthcart never intended to leave Texas. Her dream was to run the Glass Kitchen restaurant her grandmother built decades ago. But after a string of betrayals and the loss of her legacy, Portia is determined to start a new life with her sisters in Manhattan... and never cook again. But when she moves into a dilapidated brownstone on the Upper West Side, she meets twelve-year-old Ariel and her widowed father Gabriel, a man with his hands full trying to raise two daughters on his own. Soon, a promise made to her sisters forces Portia back into a world of magical food and swirling emotions, where she must confront everything she has been running from. What seems so simple on the surface is anything but when long-held secrets are revealed, rivalries exposed, and the promise of new love stirs to life like chocolate mixing with cream.
  • (5/5)
    I loved the story line. A little magic mixed with love, family issues and food. This was my first book by the author and I can't wait to read more by her.
  • (3/5)
    I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads.

    Charming! This book was as delightful as the recipe, a very fun read. I adored the sisters, their names, and their personalities. I loved how New York City became almost another character, the setting really worked for me. I didn't care for the repetitive mention that the sisters were from Texas...
  • (5/5)
    My first book by this author and I finished it the day I started reading. Yes, it's that good. I love Portia's character, she is a full blown Texan now living in NYC. So out of place yet she fits right in. I couldn't believe the kind of clothes she wore, I laughed throughout the book at her outfits, her snappiness, and her way of dealing with people. Her neighbors are interesting and the apartment she lives in is so outdated it reminds me of my great grandmothers. Portia's story is one of intrigue, betrayal, and finding love again. She has the "knowing" that was inherited from her grandma, the gift of knowing what food to prepare and how much. Her upstairs neighbor wants her apartment which is all she has left and he always gets what he wants. A delightful tale of rebuilding a life from scratch. Great characters, fast moving, and recipes in the back of the book. Gotta say I love the cover as well. I received a copy of this book free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
  • (5/5)
    I will be looking for more books by this author---this was fun. The audio was great and the story had a little of everything. I was glad that she left the recipes to the very end---I would not have wanted to listen to that during the actual story line.
  • (5/5)
    This is probably one of my new favorite books I have read this year. The story of three sisters, it focuses on family traditions and family bonds. Cordelia, Olivia, and Portia (their parents were Shakespeare fans)move from Texas to New York City, where they have inherited an old townhouse from their great-aunt Evie. Cordelia and Olivia have already sold their apartment to Gabriel, but Portia clings to her share stubbornly. Portia becomes entwined in the lives of Gabriel and his daughters, as she tries to discover a way to make a living through her cooking.

    At the age of 7, it was discovered that Portia had been born with the gift of "knowing" - knowing what food a troubled soul might need to make a heart happier or a life easier. Tragedy strikes when she is a young adult, and she turns her back on her gift, only to find it is not that easy to deny the knowing. Slowly, tentatively, she creates her life again opening her heart and her mind in the process.

  • (4/5)
    "Every kitchen should be filled with glass, to drink from, to see through, to reflect the light of a wonderful meal prepared with love." I just loved the magical prospects of this book and although it was a tiny bit overdone at the end it was an enjoyable book to read and an addition of some good recipes at the end.
  • (4/5)
    When I first started reading this and got to the knowing, I wondered where it was going. I stuck with it and glad I did.In this book life happens. So many areas touched upon. No family is the same but all walked through a mixed up family.One thing I liked bad things happened. Divorce, Death, blackmail, teenager messing up and more.The whole book covers what Portia's Grandma always said, "Some things are true, whether you believe them or not."Each one in story had issues to solve and loving others for who they were as they were.
  • (4/5)
    From the time she was a young girl, Portia Cuthcart loved cooking with her grandmother. Her grandmother had a special touch, knowing exactly what to cook to make someone feel good before they even know that they needed it. Portia inherited that unique talent.Portia was happy living in Texas with her husband, a politician, until the day she discovered her was sleeping with her best friend. Distraught, divorced and with no money, she headed to New York City to the garden apartment her aunt left her.Her sisters Cordelia and Olivia lived in New York as well, so Portia had a support system there. She discovered that the man who bought out Cordelia's and Olivia's apartments in her aunt's building also wanted to buy hers, but she did not want to sell.Gabriel is a Wall Street big money man, a widower with a two daughters. He is brooding and pushy and sexy, and he wants Portia to sell him her apartment, which Portia refuses to do. You can probably guess where this is heading.Running low on funds, Portia decides to open a restaurant with her sisters called The Glass Kitchen. Portia works her food magic, cooking dishes that come to her. She begins by selling them out of her garden apartment home, until the health department shuts her down.Gabriel hires Portia to cook for his family, and she becomes close to his younger daughter Ariel, who misses her mother terribly and was in the car when her mother had the fatal car accident. Ariel is looking for answers to questions about her mother.The descriptions of food in The Glass Kitchen will drive you into your own kitchen to recreate the recipes that Lee has helpfully put in the end of the book. You can create an entire six course meal with the recipes for Crab and Sweet Corn Chowder and Fried Chicken with Sweet Jalapeno Mustard, making this a good book for a book club meal.The Glass Kitchen has some very hot sex scenes, great descriptions of food, a terrific sister relationship and some memorable characters (the elderly neighbor couple were my favorite). It's a wonderful book to while away a Sunday afternoon and then create a delicious Sunday dinner. (And the cover art is absolutely irresistible.)
  • (5/5)
    There is a reason I don't rate many books five stars. It's so that when a book like this comes along, I can show it stands out. This is a story of damaged people coming together to help each other heal. Heartwarming, sweet and well told.
  • (4/5)
    Title: The Glass KitchenAuthor: Linda Francis LeePublisher: St Martin's PressReviewed By: Arlena DeanAge Recommended: AdultRating: 4.5Review:"The Glass Kitchen" by Linda Francis Lee was a interesting contemporary romantic read that did have some fantasy interwoven into it. I found the read and interesting way his author presented this romance. It was indeed a interesting read surrounding Portia who after managing through a horrible marriage and the death of her grandmother Portia will move to NYC broken hearted with two suitcases along with her grandmother's 'Glass Kitchen Cookbooks and the 'gift' that she no longer wanted. It was at this point I found somewhat strange but continued on with the read. Well,after reading a little further I was able to understand the thought pattern of his author and it was a good one and I liked it. 'The Knowing' wow, what was that? Even though Portia has stopped listening to 'The Knowing' which was the urges to create recipes (dishes) that would tell her that something will happen...be it good or bad...however, she would never know until it happened. I enjoyed how this was presented by the author. Those consequences Portia now wanted nothing to do with especially after what had happened to her grandmother. This I could very well understand from the read. Then life moves on and takes her to NY where we find Portia wanting to get on with her life in her new place where she thought she would be living with her sisters but to find out....the author goes another direction and presents us with new people... Gabriel Kane and his daughters. I like how this author tune the reader into one of the daughter's Ariel as well as Gabriel, who had a few secrets of his own. I think this really helped Portia come out of her funk as she will help so much with that situation with Gabriel's daughter... making a connection relationship with this family. Also, I can see it...the urging for Portia to get back into the kitchen again even though she still remembers what had happened to her earlier...wow...I liked this part best of the story. I don't want to tell to much so to spoil the story. I will say I thought this author did do a good job with this well written story and how is deepens with some secrets being revealed and surprises that did come out that will keep you truly zoomed into turning the pages until the end. I would definitely see how this one would be a very interesting to the Women's Fiction or Chick Lit readers. Oh, and at if you are into recipes check be sure to out the end of this novel for some wonderful recipes that I tried (a few) and did love them!
  • (4/5)
    As I am sure you recognize by now I tend to stay in the past when it comes to my choice in reading material. But once in a blue moon a book set in the present will appeal and I'll bite. Especially if the story revolves around food - I do love to cook! In this tale Portia learns she has inherited something called "the knowing," a feeling that tells her just what someone needs to eat at that given moment. It has apparently been running in her family for generations. She sees it as a curse, though rather than a blessing and tries to ignore it and be normal for the sake of her politician husband.We all know how that is going to work.After the divorce she goes to New York to lick her wounds and tries to fight the urge to cook. Her two sisters are already there and they try to help her in her grief. Their aunt had left them a brownstone but the other two girls had sold their shares to a man and his daughters. Portia moves into the basement apartment determined to remake her life.I must admit that I really enjoyed The Glass Kitchen. It was an entertaining novel for me after a load of heavy reading. That doesn't mean it completely made sense but sometimes you don't want a book that follows all the rules. I read it in one sitting (not that I might have in another situation. I picked it up after I hurt my leg and was couch bound. But it did keep my interest so that I didn't want to put it down.) Upon reflection though I realized how silly some parts were.Still, if you are looking for a diverting read with a somewhat engaging romance this would be a book to keep you happy. It's not all smooth sailing for our hero and heroine but it is certainly good eating.
  • (5/5)
    I love a story about triumph over tragedy and sadness. THE GLASS KITCHEN has so many amazing elements that make it a great read. There are sad and upsetting circumstances that lead to triumph over those circumstances and lead to self discovery. With great characters, great pace and a story woven with love, inspiration and soul THE GLASS KITCHEN is a story that will please the readers taste and appetite for the written word. 4.5 stars
  • (4/5)
    I really liked the light touch of magical realism, linked to Portia's relationship with food, in the new book by Linda Francis Lee. Portia has tried to suppress her gift from Gram over the years, but a tumultuous divorce and subsequent move to Manhattan naturally lead to an outbreak of magical cooking. Her great-aunt's garden apartment becomes a logical place for reflecting on what she'll do next. The upstairs neighbor, Gabriel proves to be both a distraction and a job opportunity when he needs yet another housekeeper/cook to feed his two girls. Portia and her Shakespeare-y named sisters are purported to be part of this story, but I found that Olivia quickly faded to the background until necessary, while Cordelia's mountain of family problems kept her in the game. The other set of Shakespeare girls, Ariel and Miranda, are Gabriel's. Ariel is the one that pulls at your heart, worrying that she is disappearing. The lively woman downstairs becomes a source of hope for her. Plenty of romance, teen trials and rebuilding going on here, it's an easy, fun read for summer.
  • (4/5)
    The Glass Kitchen by Linda Francis LeeWanted to read this book for a few reasons, storyline sounded strong and something that interests me and that it's about one who cooks and bakes.Like how this story starts out and the magic of the knowing. Fast paced til Portia gets to NYC where she moves into her apartment left from an aunt. Her sisters had sold their apartments.She is now divorced and has not much money left and her sisters approach her with an idea that really does not appeal to her. I am so glad she brought the glass kitchen cookbook from her grandmother with her.Love her ideas and the food selections from the customers ailments that she is able to cure with ingredients that are healthy.She is able to not only help the children of Gabriel but she stands up for herself with help from others, vs. her ex husband and his dealings. Misunderstandings draw them all apart from one another and secrets, hidden well, will bring them back together.I received this book from ReadingGroupGuides.com in exchange for my honest review.
  • (5/5)
    Portia Cuthbert who cooks amazing food, amazing because it's so good but also because it's food people need - even when they don't realize it. Porta has the same gift/curse her grandmother had called the "knowing" but she's been thinking it was more of a curse than a gift - partly because of what happened to her grandmother and partly because of her here of a husband who wanted her to be "normal". Portia has been living with her sister while waiting for her divorce settlement. But she's had enough and so moves into the brownstone apartment given to her by her Great-Aunt. Her sisters have already sold their apartments to Gabriel. Gabriel is a recent widower who has two daughters, Ariel and Miranda.

    The story is charming, funny and hot and there's a good balance between the realism and mysticism.

    Ariel's story and the food descriptions are really what make this book so good. Ms. Lee's mysticism reminds me of Sarah Allen Addison a favorite author of mine.
  • (5/5)
    This has become one of my "go-to" books for comfort, for entertainment, for hope!
  • (5/5)
    Love love love . What a lovely book .
    I am looking forward to read more of her books
  • (4/5)
    I loved the story. Could have left out sexual details.
  • (4/5)
    This was a lovely story, which took me to and from the office, during hour commutes. The ex-husband character resembles my own ex, so I cheered when Portia’s story had a happy ending, in a new blended family. It happens in real life, too. The food creations made it a delectable read, as well.
  • (5/5)
    Well narrated, written in a way to keep the reader continue reading. I was sad it finished!
  • (4/5)
    As I am sure you recognize by now I tend to stay in the past when it comes to my choice in reading material. But once in a blue moon a book set in the present will appeal and I'll bite. Especially if the story revolves around food - I do love to cook! In this tale Portia learns she has inherited something called "the knowing," a feeling that tells her just what someone needs to eat at that given moment. It has apparently been running in her family for generations. She sees it as a curse, though rather than a blessing and tries to ignore it and be normal for the sake of her politician husband.We all know how that is going to work.After the divorce she goes to New York to lick her wounds and tries to fight the urge to cook. Her two sisters are already there and they try to help her in her grief. Their aunt had left them a brownstone but the other two girls had sold their shares to a man and his daughters. Portia moves into the basement apartment determined to remake her life.I must admit that I really enjoyed The Glass Kitchen. It was an entertaining novel for me after a load of heavy reading. That doesn't mean it completely made sense but sometimes you don't want a book that follows all the rules. I read it in one sitting (not that I might have in another situation. I picked it up after I hurt my leg and was couch bound. But it did keep my interest so that I didn't want to put it down.) Upon reflection though I realized how silly some parts were.Still, if you are looking for a diverting read with a somewhat engaging romance this would be a book to keep you happy. It's not all smooth sailing for our hero and heroine but it is certainly good eating.
  • (5/5)
    It was an easy read, good story, with lots of humor.
    Delightful!
  • (1/5)
    Copy I read was from my local public library.From the publisher's blurb: "The Glass Kitchen is a delicious novel, a tempestuous story of a woman washed up on the shores of Manhattan who discovers that a kitchen—like an island—can be a refuge, if only she has the courage to give in to the pull of love, the power of forgiveness, and accept the complications of what it means to be family."This was a disappointing read.Portia does not "give into the pull of love." She lets herself be manipulated by Gabriel, a control freak who doles out his kisses, caresses, and rare smiles as if he is rewarding an obedient child. It's like a bad 1950s movie where the man knows what the woman wants and he'll give it to her when he's darn good and ready and if she questions it, he'll pick her up, toss her over his shoulder, and carry her off.All the glorious descriptions of food (and the food does sound good) can not cure the sick-to-my stomach feeling I got every time this jerk came near her. By the time I finished the book I had no desire to look at the recipes thoughtfully included at the end. The forgiveness part of the blurb is accurate. This woman forgives alright, she forgives way too much: her lover's commandeering ways, his lies and deception, his total lack of understanding of his two daughters. She also forgives a major betrayal by one of her sisters. She is even pushed around by her own "gift," a sort of paranormal intuition to know ahead of time just which foods to prepare for potential diners.There is a story here, other than the yucky "romance." It concerns the reasons for the animosity between Gabriel and his brother, which partly explains why Gabriel and his daughters have such a messed up relationship. I wish that story line had been better developed.Twelve year old Ariel, the younger of Gabriel's daughters, is seeing a psychiatrist. Frankly, everyone in this book should be in therapy. ( Both sets of sisters have Shakespearean names. Portia's sisters are Cordelia and Olivia; Ariel's sister is Miranda. The Shakespeare play that came to my mind while I was reading this book was The Taming of the Shrew. We get the feeling at the end of that play that Katherine can hold her own with Petruchio. I not as optimistic about Portia in The Glass Kitchen.) I wish I had not started this book, let alone finished it.
  • (5/5)
    The glass kitchen by Linda Francis Lee is a light-hearted luscious read! I absolutely fell in love with Portia, Olivia, and Cordelia, the Cuthcart sisters. From Texas to New York, this is a delicious adventure that had me laughing, crying, and dreaming of life lived on my own terms. Lee has created a magical place, The Glass Kitchen, where love and family are the staples of life. The addition of Portia’s “knowing” makes the reader dive into the story with abandon. I can’t wait to make some of the recipes that accompany this fabulous story! Cheers to Lee for a story well told!
  • (4/5)
    This is the perfect beach read – a love story set in New York City. Portia, a native of Texas, is forced to move when her political husband is caught having an affair with her best friend. She comes to live in the city with her two sisters, but unable to find anything else, she moves into the garden apartment that was left to her by her grandmother. The owner of the rest of the building becomes her love interest but before she can deal with that she must find a way to support not only herself, but her two sisters as well. Out comes other grandmother’s cookbooks and the second Glass Kitchen is born. There are few surprises but it is a fun read.
  • (4/5)
    Portia Cuthcart has spent years suppressing her cooking magic and trying to be the perfect politicians wife. Even after her husband’s betrayal and an acrimonious divorce, Portia is afraid to let magic have too much control over her life. However, her sisters are facing difficulties of their own and want Portia’s help reviving their grandmother’s restaurant. Portia has an even harder time saying no to her attractive neighbor and his children, all of whom are still coming to terms with losing their wife/mother. Portia wants to take a chance on magic again but she’s not certain that even a cooking a good meal can solve all of her problems.

    I picked up The Glass Kitchen immediately after finishing the beautiful but heartbreaking The End of Your Life Book Club and it was exactly the heartwarming read I was hoping for. I loved the idea of cooking magic, with Portia drawing on the power of food to make people feel certain emotions to give people exactly what they need. I also loved the way Portia often compared things or people to food. Since we all have experience with food, I thought it was a good way to create descriptions people could relate to. It also added to the cozy feel of the book.

    Portia’s personality in general was one of my favorite parts of the book. She’s compassionate and caring, but quirky and stubborn too. I was less fond of the love interest, her stubborn, possessive, over-protective neighbor. Even though Portia was able to stand up to his powerful personality, even though he had to learn to compromise and admit he was wrong, I finished the book still not sure how I felt about him. I wasn’t completely convinced their relationship wasn’t mostly based on sexual attraction and I wanted more than that for Portia. On the other hand, I loved everything about her relationship with the neighbor’s daughters. Portia’s interaction with them helped differentiate this story from all the other fluffy, you-know-they’ll-end-up-together books out there. This still wasn’t my favorite ever book of that variety, but was a very sweet story and one I’d particularly recommend to foodies looking for a happy, cozy read.

    This review first published on Doing Dewey.
  • (4/5)
    The Glass Kitchen: A Novel of Sisters by Linda Francis Lee is a sweet tale about three sisters, the magic of knowing, and romance. Olivia, Cordelia, and Portia are the three Cuthcart sisters who live in Willow Creek, Texas. Portia was seven years old when she has her first experience with the “knowing”. Portia can predict what someone will want, need, or how to help them with food. She inherited the gift from her grandmother. Portia’s grandmother took her into the kitchen of the restaurant, The Glass Kitchen. The restaurant had been passed down from generation to generation.One day Portia envisioned a special meal for her grandmother. That meal changed Portia life. It sent her down the wrong path. Portia married Robert Baleau a lawyer and local politician. Robert wanted Portia to be “normal” so Portia suppressed her gifts. After being married for a few years, Robert’s true colors came to light. The girls Great Aunt Evie was an actress living in New York City and the girls spent their summers with her growing up. She owned a town home on the Upper West Side that she converted into three apartments before her death. One apartment for each girl. Cordelia and Olivia sold their apartments to Garbriel Kane. Portia’s husband wanted her to sell, but she refused. After her divorce Portia goes to New York City to start over.Gabriel Kane’s wife passed away in an auto accident and he has moved his family from Montclair, New Jersey to the home in New York City. Miranda is a teenager who is acting out. Ariel is 12 (almost 13 as she likes to remind everyone) and has decided that her father needs a girlfriend. Ariel thinks he needs to focus his attentions on someone other the girls. Gabriel was always busy with business before his wife passed away. He is determined to be a part of the girl’s lives. However, Portia irritates and fascinates Gabriel.Portia has to decide what to do with her future. As she starts to embrace her gift again, the future becomes clear to her. But what will become of Gabriel and Portia? Gabriel is hiding something.There is also a mystery involving Garbriel’s brother, Anthony. It will provide a great twist near the end of the book. The story also shows us a little about the lives of Olivia and Cordelia. I give The Glass Kitchen 4 out of 5 stars. It is a sweet romance story with a touch of magic and whimsy. It follows the normal romance formula: boy meets girl, girl and boy are attracted to each other, they fall in love, they have an argument, and then they eventually get back together again. However, I like the addition of the sisters, Ariel, and the magic element. I received a complimentary copy of this book from NetGalley (and St. Martin’s Press) in exchange for an honest review.
  • (4/5)
    Food really does get to the heart of so many things. We have comfort food and food that brings up memories. We all have favorites and also foods we really don't like at all. When food is right, it can be magical. And magical is the right term for Linda Francis Lee's newest novel, The Glass Kitchen. Portia Cuthcart runs to New York City after her husband and best friend cheat on her and her marriage falls apart, moving into the basement garden apartment in the old rundown brownstone that she and her two sisters inherited from their great aunt. She is not only trying to escape her failed marriage but also her own brand of family magic, "the knowing," that she thinks caused her beloved grandmother's death. "The knowing" is a feeling that Portia gets when she must cook something. She has no idea why, just that she must do it. After her grandmother's death, combined with her politician husband's disapproval of this power, she has shoved her abilities down and ignored them. But now having left Texas, she's going to have to face her talent and start cooking again. The morning she moves into the apartment is the first time in a long time that she feels compelled to cook. It's also the morning she meets her rugged, very sexy upstairs neighbor, Gabriel Kane. Gabriel is the widowed father of a teen and a preteen, Miranda and Ariel, and he's bought the two upstairs apartments from Portia's sisters. Although Portia vows to steer clear of him, especially since he wants to buy her apartment and she has no intention of selling, she cannot help but be drawn into Ariel's life and therefore into Gabriel's. As she gets closer to Gabriel, Portia also learns allow herself to be who she is, opening a take-out café/bakery of sorts in her apartment with her sisters while they look for funding to open a complete restaurant. This is a sweet and delicious love story, a tale of second chances and opening yourself up to what comes your way. The magic portrayed here is subtle and points to the kitchen and food as the heart of home and relationship. It allows Portia, despite her very real fears, to uncover secrets that need to be aired out and to help people heal, including herself. The development of Portia and Gabriel's relationship is not too fast and not too slow and the inclusion of Gabriel's less than loving mother and selfish brother serve to make his own character that much more appealing. Ariel is a charming child character, precocious but not annoying. Miranda, on the other hand, is a typical pill of a teenager. The book is organized into a multiple course menu, giving the reader some indication of where they are and where they are still going in this quirky treat of a novel. And for those readers who love recipes, this has some very tempting ones included at the end.