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Adios A Las Armas

Adios A Las Armas

Escrito por Ernest Hemingway

Narrado por Hernando Iván Cano


Adios A Las Armas

Escrito por Ernest Hemingway

Narrado por Hernando Iván Cano

valoraciones:
3/5 (4,235 valoraciones)
Longitud:
3 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 ene 2002
ISBN:
9781611553949
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

El metodo casi periodistico y descarnado de Hemingway muestra al joven idealista Frederick Henry, quien despues de cumplir como voluntario en el ejercito, se enamora y huye, para encontrarse con dramas incluso superiores a los del campo de batalla. Es una novela llena de significados y con un fondo, que a pesar de su realismo es de un romanticismo digno de los grandes creadores del siglo XIX.
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 ene 2002
ISBN:
9781611553949
Formato:
Audiolibro

Sobre el autor

Ernest Hemingway was an American journalist, novelist, short story writer, and sportsman. His economical and understated style, which he termed “the iceberg theory,” had a strong influence on twentieth-century fiction, while his adventurous lifestyle and public image brought him admiration from later generations.



Reseñas

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3.0
4235 valoraciones / 107 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    It's been a long time since I read Hemingway. This is my first time for "A Farewell to Arms." It's a slow starter, but I learned to pace myself. The action is restrained but steady, and I realized gradually that a key element is the relentlessly realistic dialogue. The American protagonist, Frederick Henry, is involved in every scene. The life of the book is his life. His recurring, desultory involvement in his own life and his role in the Italian Army in World War I is the backdrop of his elaborately played out relationship with the nurse, Catherine Barkley. "A Farewell to Arms" doesn't really seem to be a war novel. On the other hand, except for brief interludes, the characters really don't seem to be at peace. For Henry, it's an ironic farewell.
  • (3/5)
    My least favorite of Papa's major novels. It merits mention fo rbeing a conversation starter. I was reading this in a pub and was approached by a guy. He proved to be a nutter. I didn't know that then. He approached, pointed to my book and began rambling about how Hemingway and Hunter Thompson understood the essence of things (this was years before Thompson's suicide) and that their lives of excess were a just a relief for their clairty. That is my paraphrase. I wound up talking to the guy for hours and drinking a deal of beeer. I have seen him twice since then. He doesn't appear to remember me.
  • (5/5)
    Set in Italy during WWI, the narrator of A Farewell to Arms is an American lieutenant serving with the Italian army as part of the ambulance corp (echoing Hemingway's own experience). On good terms with the Italian officers he is stationed with, his love affair with a local English nurse deepens when he is badly wounded by a shell, but once his convalescence is complete and he returns to the front he discovers that the summer has been a difficult one for his compatriots, and his war turns a very different corner.Given Hemingway's first-hand experience of what he was writing about, this book felt very powerful on many levels. Less about the experiences of being in the middle of the fighting on the front-line battlefield (although at one point it touches on it in a hugely impacting way), it is more about the myriad of war experiences of the men involved in the Italian front in the border mountains with Austria-Hungary, especially while they were waiting for the bigger offensives to take place. As the protagonist is wounded, we experience the juxtaposition of life in untouched Milan, where normality continues to a large extent, and the difficulty of then returning to a much changed war. The depictions of being part of a losing army that is being pushed back were deeply moving and engrossing, and Hemingway puts us front and centre in the middle of the confusions, heightened emotions and dangers that arose during the chaos of a major retreat.At its core, this book is the story of a love affair being conducted in the thick of the war. The protagonist's lover is very much a woman of that time, so if outdated depictions of a woman's raison d'être being to keep her man happy then perhaps this is not the book for you. However, if you take it for what it is - a fictional account of a war relationship from a very different era - it's a terrific read. His sentence style is a little bizarre at times (on occasions he jumps around topics between commas requiring some rereading to get the flow of the sentence properly), but the occasional choppiness in style somehow fits the tensions of the time where one couldn't afford to think too deeply and long-term about anything.Overall, I'm surprised and delighted by my first Hemingway. It was a fabulous page-turner, and I'll definitely be back for more.4.5 stars - one of the most authentic wider war experience books I've read to date.
  • (5/5)
    An interesting text illustrating how Hemingway transformed his inner emotions and memories into art. His prose has the feel of hand-rubbed oil-finished oak wood grain, and the more the reader knows about Hemingway's biography, the more interesting this book becomes as a crafted surface displaying the objective correlatives of his inner life. From his difficult childhood, to his experiences in WWI at the age of 19, and his immersion into a literal landscape of corpses and ideological pointlessness, there touched by a flame of romantic hope only to have it blown out, all of these elements combine in A Farewell to Arms. Beauty, the possibility of meaning, bombs blowing limbs off, any second your life could be over, a glimpse of hope and then “War, death, or sickness, did lay siege to it, Making it momentary as a sound.”
  • (4/5)
    Woof - what a depressing book in many ways. I had a love/hate relationship with this book while reading it. The writing style of short and to the point sentences was both appealing and frustrating. I felt that it made the characters a bit too one dimensional, but at the same time helped give a matter-of-factness to the war and the people living through it. I am glad I read this, my first Hemingway, and feel like I understand the point of the hopelessness of war and life of the time.
  • (3/5)
    Hemingways gaafste roman. Opvallend contrast tussen harde oorlogscenes en sweet talk tussen de geliefden. Hun relatie is onromantisch, maar toch zoet;