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Owl at Home

Owl at Home

Escrito por Arnold Lobel

Narrado por Mark Linn-Baker


Owl at Home

Escrito por Arnold Lobel

Narrado por Mark Linn-Baker

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (55 valoraciones)
Longitud:
15 minutos
Editorial:
Publicado:
Oct 20, 2009
ISBN:
9780061901607
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Welcome to Owl's Cozy home!

Owl lives by himself in a warm little house. But whether Owl is inviting Winter in on a snowy night or welcoming a new friend he meets while on a stroll, Owl always has room for visitors!

Arnold Lobel's beloved Level 2 I Can Read classic was created for kids who read on their own but still need a little help.

The classic Frog and Toad stories by Arnold Lobel have won numerous awards and honors, including a Newbery Honor, a Caldecott Honor, ALA Notable Children’s Book, Fanfare Honor List (Horn Book), School Library Journal Best Children’s Book, and Library of Congress Children’s Book.

Editorial:
Publicado:
Oct 20, 2009
ISBN:
9780061901607
Formato:
Audiolibro


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4.6
55 valoraciones / 12 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    Story 1.)The Guest:Focuses on the idea of having good manners as a house guest by exemplifying bad manners using the season of winter as a story character.Story 2.) Strange Bumps:A funny story demonstrating the need for logic when faced with a situation that seems scary and unexplainable.Story 3.) Tear-Water TeaDemonstrates that it is okay to be sad about things sometimes and how people need to go through a period of sadness to in order to feel better.Story 4.) Upstairs and Downstairs:Classic story of the grass is greener on the other side. Illustrates how you can't be in two places at once and need to choose a side or compromise and find the middle.Story 5.) Owl and the MoonShows the quality of reciprocation necessary to have a good friendship. Also shows that by just being there as a friend you can make others happy.All five stories offer students a richer understanding of the world around them through the whimsical eyes of owl. Lobel did a great job of passing along mature lessons and ideas in very simple and understandable stories.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful if sometimes a bit absurd book. Upstairs-downstairs is a favourite with my grandson, making tea with tears is a bit too much for
  • (4/5)
    This book is a time honored classic by award winning author and illustrator Arnold Lobel. Owl at Home is a hilarious look into the misunderstandings of an Owl who is not quite as wise as you would think. The book is composed of five stories: The Guest, Strange Bumps, Tear-Water Tea, Upstairs-Downstairs, and Owl and the Moon. In each story, Owl shows his childlike nature by doing things that a young child might do (i.e. - trying to be upstairs and downstairs at once, befriending the moon, getting afraid at bumps under the blanket which turn out to be his knees). It makes this story the perfect book to read to young children, or to give them practice beginning to read on their own because it's something that they can relate to. It's unfortunate that this book was written nearly twenty years ago and has fallen out of circulation with today's current trends. But, for me, it will always be a classic that can be used as anything from a early reading challenge to a bedtime story. Two thumbs up!
  • (4/5)
    Reason for Reading: My son read this aloud to me.Comments: I'm very familiar with this book but had never actually read it before! This contains four chapters, each its own individual story. Owl, himself, is not the brightest bulb in the package and while very polite and considerate he ends up in the silliest situations because of his own misunderstandings. Three of the stories follow this theme, while the third is a simple tale that shows his simple ways of making tea.Owl is a dear you can't help but love because of his simple yet good-natured ways. My son was laughing joyously at the antics Owl ends up in and Lobel's illustrations of course add volumes to the simple easy reader text. Arnold Lobel is well known for his illustrations but he was also a master of the easy reader. His books contain both phonetic and common sight words making them appropriate for readers who have passed the basic phonics level. A fun book to read aloud to youngers and a perfect easy reader.
  • (5/5)
    Melancholy stories about Owl and his days as told by Arnold Lobel. From making tear-drop tea to befriending the moon Owl has magic in everyday. Easy ReaderI saw Lobel on the list - so hopefully this choice counts, because I love Owl at Home. These sad sweet stories are amazing for the Easy Reader Genre. Owl is my alter ego I'm sure. Tear drop tea is too amazing for words.Kids respond well to this book. We read it in first grade this year. To paraphrase the Langley School Music Project, What is lost these days is the sense of melancholy kids love. They have an emotional scape more broad than a lot of literature gives them credit for.
  • (4/5)
    Summary:This is a series of short stories about Owl, a loveable but not too smart owl. The stories are written with simple language and are perfect for an early reader who can read the stories but will also be able to see Owl's conclusions are not always correct or smart. Review:This kind of book for early readers is right up there with Frog and Toad. Owl is wonderfully illustrated by Arnold Lobel who gives Owl a simple innocence sometimes not found in books today.
  • (4/5)
    I love Arnold Lobel illustrations. A truly easy read that is fun to read, not boring.
  • (4/5)
    Here are five short stories about owl (who is not the brightest). They are simple, sweet, and funny.
  • (5/5)
    This book is so silly it’s hilarious. Owl is so crazy that it’s funny. We were laughing throughout the chapters. Haha. Great job Arnold!
  • (5/5)
    A wonderful piece for a for bedtime. Sleep came in a blink.
  • (5/5)
    I liked it becasue the owl was frieds with the moon and was kind.
  • (3/5)
    I had mixed feeling about this book after reading it. I liked the book because I thought the plot was very organized. The storybook was compiled with short stories of Owl dealing with various situations, and how he was able to overcome each obstacle. I thought this type of plot was interesting, and it allowed for multiple opportunities for suspense. During each story when Owl was confronted with a difficult situation there was suspense in how he was going to be able to overcome it. For example, when he invited winter in the house and it was causing chaos there was suspense in how he was going to get it to leave. Each story was completed in this manor, and this helped to create a well-paced flow to storybook. I thought that the short stories also would help to keep the readers engaged. With having a new story every few pages students would be able to keep their interest and their engagement. The language was also very clear throughout the story. It was patterned and easy for students to read. One example of a typical sentence is, “who can it be? Said Owl. Knocking and thumping at my door on a night like this.” These sentences could be easy for students to read and do not have too many complicated words. The reason I had mixed feelings about the story was because I thought some of the stories were a little bit too unreasonable. They were playful stories for children, but some of them were a little too unrealistic for my own personal taste. For example in one story Owl was scared of the bumps at the end of his bed. He kept moving his feet but still did not understand that the bumps were being created by his very own feet. The story would be interesting for young students, but I thought it was a little too naïve, but could be good for students in the primary grades. Another reason I did like the story was that the character was well-developed in my opinion. Owl was able to display many emotions throughout the story. And handled the situation in ways that made him more developed. Another reason that I liked the story was that the illustrations were able to really enhance the story in my opinion. For example, in the first story Owl invited winter into his house and winter created havoc on the house. But the illustrations really show how much chaos winter is causing in the house. Having the illustrations was able to really show what was happening, and in this way enhanced the story. The illustrations also fit the written text quite well. The stories were written in almost a whimsical way, and the illustrations also were drawn that way. I believe the big message of the story is that bad situations can be overcome with some ingenuity and willpower. Owl is able to overcome each new situation by thinking clever and trying new things.