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The Real Mother Goose

The Real Mother Goose

Escrito por Blanche Fisher Wright

Narrado por Steve Blane


The Real Mother Goose

Escrito por Blanche Fisher Wright

Narrado por Steve Blane

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (16 valoraciones)
Longitud:
35 minutos
Publicado:
Oct 1, 2013
ISBN:
9780486781563
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

Pulled from the classic 1916 edition of Real Mother Goose, this collection presents several classic rhymes including "Ring a Ring of Roses," Jack Sprat," "Little Jack Horner," "Old King Cole" and so many more.
Publicado:
Oct 1, 2013
ISBN:
9780486781563
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro


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4.5
16 valoraciones / 16 Reseñas
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  • (4/5)
    The Real Mother Goose may not include my favorite kids’ rhyme to teach college freshmen. Many memorize it at first hearing:“Little Robin Redbreast Sitting on a pole—Niddle noddle went his headAnd poop went his hole.”That was printed in early Mother Goose books in England, but maybe suppressed (like Sir John Suckling’s “Love is the fart / Of every heart,” 1646) until unearthed in the last few decades.Speaking of England, these have a distinctly British accent, like "Little Robin Redbreast": that's the British bird, very small, while the American Robin is good-sized for a songbird. And "Itsy, bitsy spider went up the garden spout": it's the outdoor yard spout--the British word for "yard" is "garden." And there are more, yet we consider them American nursery rhymes.I wonder how many kids learn Mother Goose now, maybe fewer than when I read ‘em to my kids four decades ago, though of course I’d learned dozens as a kid, and maybe now many learn from parents who also learned by hearing, not reading. Little Bo-Peep has lost her sheep, Little Boy Blue come blow your horn, and especially, “Rain, rain, go awayCome again some other day,Little Johnny wants to play.”I say this in the rainy aftermath of Hurricane Michael on our south New England coast. Lots about shepherd kids and their sheep, some about pigs (and "This little piggy"), and of course much about field and hills,“Jack and Jill went up the hillTo fetch a pail of water.Jack fell down and broke his crown,And Jill came tumbling after.”Maybe this one needs revision; it suggests females can not avoid males’ calamities. I’m quite sure as a kid my sense of Jack’s broken crown was in fact a diadem, not a brain hemorrhage. Besides rural geography, there’s many food references, like“Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake,Baker’s man.Bake me a cake As fast as you can.Pat it, and prick it,And mark it with T.Put it in the oven For Tommy and me.”But the most comprehensive dietary assessment, “Jack Sprat could eat no fat,His wife could eat no lean;And so, betwixt them both,They licked the platter clean.” Debates about the health of fat or meat go back at least to the Renaissance, and Robert Burton’s Anatomy of Melancholy— which dicusses the effect of meat on depression (the Renaissance word for it, in the title).Some are satires on cuteness, like “There was a little girl/ Who had a little curl,/ Right in the middle of her forehead./ When she was good, /She was very, very good;/ But when she was bad, she was horrid.” Longfellow wrote that, and the little curly girl strikes up an upstairs fit her mom mistakes for the boys’ fighting.Then there's the astronomical ones, "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star...like a diamond in the sky." Romeo tells us Juliet's eyes would be brighter than the fairest stars. But we are still on the nursery level about stars, "How I wonder what you are, / Up above the world so high...." And the meteorological ones, "Itsy, bitsy spider/ Went up the garden spout./ Down came the rain and/ Washed the spider out.// Out came the sun and/ Dried up all the rain./ The itsy, bitsy spider / Climbed up the spout again."Many of the rhymes urge kids into athletic or physical skills, “Jack be nimble, Jack be quick,/ Jack jump over the Candle-stick.” Wonder what kids make of this if they’ve never seen a candlestick—or, implied in the verse, a candle in it, unless it’s a very tall candle-holder, which the past did feature.
  • (5/5)
    This is the same Mother Goose I had as a child in the late 40s and early 50s. The illustrations are classic and beautiful. I can say many of the rhymes by heart. They helped develop a love for words. Many of the rhymes have historical significance.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: This book has a multitude of stories, poems and tales. Classic tales: jack be nimble, we willie winkie, old woman in a shoe etc...The pictures in the book are beautifully done with extreme attention to children. Personal: this book has been handed down from my brother-in-law, to my children. We often refer to this book when we have classroom assignments that need a rhyme or a tale. I try to read this book to my children instead of some of the "newer" ones they enjoy, because of the history and how much i loved them as a child.Extension ideas: 1.) during the lesson on rhyme words, I would read this book aloud and have the children point out (verbally) the rhyme in the story. 2. I would group the children in 3's and have them come up with their own rhyming words , using their spelling words. They could draw pictures to go along with the rhyming words they had found.
  • (5/5)
    This is a great book full of Mother Goose nursery rhymes! The illustrations in this book are fabulous. Each illustration goes along with the rhyme very well. This book is full of classic nursery rhymes that are wonderful to read to a child. This book is also great to give to a child who is learning to read. I recommend this book for all children, especially those who love nursey rhymes!
  • (5/5)
    Great classic nursery rhymes for children of all ages. This book included all traditional tale and nursery rhymes your grandparents remember. I have had this book my entire life and will be happy to share it with my own children one day. I recommend this book to everyone with children!
  • (5/5)
    This compellation of classic nursery rhymes is a great way to get younger children into reading.
  • (5/5)
    A gigantic compilation of Mother Goose rhymes with beautiful illustrations. With over 200 different rhymes and stories, this book can never get old!
  • (3/5)
    This classic book gives everyone the chance to read the children's classic nursery rimes that you read as a child. It is also interesting to have children read some of these rimes that they may have never even heard before. The pictures are set to be very old and the colors are interesting to go along with the four to five poems on each page. A fun read to have for younger children at home or at the Kindergarten level.
  • (5/5)
    This quintessential collection of Mother Goose nursery rhymes, both well-known and obscure, is profusely illustrated. May be confusing for younger readers as the connection between text and illustrations is not always clear and not all of the rhymes have illustrations. Nonetheless the sheer volume of rhymes and pictures should satisfy readers of all ages. Charming ink and watercolor illustrations by Blanche Fisher Wright are reminiscent of the Art Deco movement. Best suited for individual or pair perusal as the pages are crowded, and some illustrations are small.
  • (4/5)
    This Mother Goose collection contains over 300 verses and includes Wright's 1916 illustrations. Certainly, the overwhelming number of rhymes makes this a book for adults and children to thumb through and find their favorite verses or intriguing pictures. For parents concerned about the cultural literacy of the children, this book can quell those fears as virtually any verse any one can think of is included. Since there are so many verses, though, not everyone has an illustration, meaning many of them may be lost on young readers. On the other hand, many of the illustrations are interesting. There are many pictures with children. The watercolor and ink make the pictures clear and colorful. Some have interesting detail, like Little Boy Blue with four different toys. This is appropriate for ages 3 to 6.
  • (5/5)
    Great collection of rhymes to use for a poetry unit.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: When people think of Mother Goose books, this is the tome they think of! With the rich color prints and black and white drawings throughout the poetry, this is one of the first books for children ever purchased by families. The cover is a material covered in a color print of a witch riding a large goose carrying a baby in her basket. Some of the poems are not politically correct for 2008 but most still have their charm and certainally all have their place in history. Some poems and sing-song chants started to warn children or to scare them into being good. This collection of poems is something most children are exposed to and I would consider to be a staple of all libraries.Review:The book from 1916 belongs to my collection and I was drawn to it by it's age and it's wonderful pictures. The artist did an amazing job of using many colors to draw in small children and to visually tell the story. Many of the poems I had never heard as a child and I found interesting as an adult. It is not a surprise to me that this book has been printed over and over and is still being read to children.
  • (5/5)
    I grew up reading and hearing these nursery rhymes. There is something magical and very comfortable about the words.
  • (4/5)
     This book is so simple with traditional rhymes, riddles, songs, poetry and stories. Its a great book to teach children about rhymes and poetry.
  • (3/5)
    This one frustrates me a bit because I loved it when I was a kid and our nursery rhymes are indeed an important part of my heritage but it perplexes Emmett because it's so chock-full of nursery rhymes that only like every fourth or fifth one gets an illustration, and sometimes it's a really perfunctory one like a generically oldtimey woman in a bonnet and kirtle sitting by a tree and she could be Little Bo Peep or the old lady who swallowed a fly or the Queen of Hearts missing her tarts or whatever really. He prefers the (by most measures inferior) Sing a Song of Sixpence book because the images help him bootstrap into the content. So there is treasure hid away in these pages, but my feelings about reading it with actual kids are nevertheless mixed. (I'm also curious about the provenance and specific meaning of the "real,' since you can't like own a nursery rhyme man. it reeks of insecurity-driven, belligerent self-important self-assertion, like the Real IRA or twitter accounts on the template of @darealbubbasparxxx or @shialebeoufREAL)
  • (4/5)
    I remember having a hardback version of this book growing up. I think my sister has it now (for my niece). I've been wanting to revisit it for some time, so when it showed up in my Little Free Library, I grabbed it for another read-through.Here are all the classic Mother Goose rhymes and riddles, some that have become so common we know them by heart, others that aren't as well known; but all worth a read.I feel like every home should have a copy of this book.