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Child's Garden of Verses

Child's Garden of Verses

Escrito por Robert Louis Stevenson

Narrado por Steve Blane


Child's Garden of Verses

Escrito por Robert Louis Stevenson

Narrado por Steve Blane

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (39 valoraciones)
Longitud:
53 minutos
Publicado:
Oct 1, 2013
ISBN:
9780486781112
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

Robert Louis Stevenson's "Happy Thought" betokens all the joy and wonder of A Child's Garden of Verses. The poetic musings of this well-loved classic recapture childhood mysteries that range from the everyday rituals of home ("The Land of Nod," "Escape at Bedtime," and "My Bed Is a Boat") to the curiosities of a wider world ("Foreign Lands," "Pirate Story," and "Where Go the Boats?").
Publicado:
Oct 1, 2013
ISBN:
9780486781112
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro


Sobre el autor

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850–1894) was a Scottish novelist, travel writer, poet, and children’s author. Plagued by poor health his entire life, he was nevertheless an amazingly prolific writer, and created some of the most influential and entertaining fiction of the nineteenth century, including Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

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4.3
39 valoraciones / 44 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    This was given to me in 1977 by my good friend Melanie from Pittsburgh, who was replacing one of the few books I owned in childhood. The illustrations have been seared into my memory since I was five. Robert Louis Stevenson's poems are just right for children to wonder and to love. More than forty years later, I have to say--Thanks, Melanie!
  • (4/5)
    Most of these poems were timeless. They were written for and about children from the 1800's, but can apply to children in 2018. Examples include poems about bed time, playing, imagination, and adventures. That being said, there are some poems that are not culturally acceptable in 2018. I think that this book of poetry can be used as a great teaching tool. It is also a great chance to show students how far we have come.
  • (4/5)
    I remember owning an abridged version of this book as a child. I later located a copy of the complete version in a library to read. I just re-read the complete version. The poems are age appropriate for children, but I suspect many of them are a bit dated for today's children. Still many of the poems stand the test of time. The edition I read was from 1905 with illustrations by Jessie Willcox Smith. These are watercolor plates chosen to illustration some of the poems. Most poems are accompanied by line drawings as well.
  • (5/5)
    Delightful, a classic
  • (5/5)
    This is a book of poems that is suitable for children in the early childhood level. Kids will love the catchy poems and colorful pictures in this book.
  • (3/5)
    Whether your child has difficulty falling asleep, or wants to escape into fairyland, this book will satisfy all those desires. Short poems to amuse, long ones to lull and quiet; poems about singing, swinging, and travelling - everything a child does in his young life are detailed in these poems. The illustrations are simple, but give the poem just enough visual detail to entrance the listening child, or reading child. Colours are expressive, and reflect the mood of the poem. Sneaking robbers hush howling dogs and swings soar into the wild blue to join the birds.Though this set of poems might be a bit old fashioned nowadays, they still have merit in lives. There are still swings, windy nights, forests and jungles (real and imaginary) and there is always bedtime.
  • (4/5)
    I love this edition - a Dover hardback with beautiful dark green cover, vellum-like dust jacket and red satin bookmark ribbon. Looking forward to enjoying these poems - naive and playful, though tinged with some ominous subtle melancholy.
  • (4/5)
    A Child's Garden of Verses is the epitome of poetry for and about children. The imagination of a child grows wild and free among the pages. Hopes and fears are expressed as only children can. The sense of wonder and innocence resonates as reminders to all adults about how the world once was.
  • (4/5)
    A great collection of poetry for young children.The artwork is also very delightful.
  • (3/5)
    This is the perfect first poetry book to add to a child's personal library. The poems range from very short to page long, with focus on nature, fantasy, make-believe, and other fun activities of childhood.
  • (4/5)
    4PAge range: 4-8 years.Radical Change: I don't think radical change applies to this book.Selected poem: "Foreign Lands" (p. 22)
  • (5/5)
    This is a very lovely little book - the poems are very pretty rhymes that delight the ear. I loved these poems as a child, and continue to adore them as an adult. Ever so often I get a 'craving' to read them over again, and again. They are full of the magic and whimsy of childhood.The world is so full of a number of things,I'm sure we should allbe as happy as kings.Rating: 5/5 Recommended: these are beautiful poems to read aloud to your children - a word of warning, though, they were written in 1885 and two or three are inappropriate in today's more enlightened society. 'Foreign Children' in particular, is quite offensive, but it's easy enough to skip one or two pages and enjoy the rest of the book.  
  • (5/5)
    An amazing author puts together amazing poems! This is a wonderful book for any aged reader & makes poetry very fun. Shows how beautiful poetry can be!
  • (4/5)
    The poems mostly have to do with going off to imaginary lands, utilizing common things in a playful fashion, and enjoying the wonderous time of childhood while it lasts. It's all touched very heavily by nostalgia - I don't know anything about Robert Louis Stevenson's life, but it seems he really wanted his adult life to be simpler and less soul-destroying, ha ha. I think it's kind of funny how adults wax nostalgic about the simpleness of childhood; quite clearly children don't feel it's simple or wonderous very much of the time. ;)The illustrations by Gyo Fujikawa are also sweetly nostalgic, full of cherubic boys and girls, lush grasses, delicately pretty flowers, butterflies, and birds, etc. I think the artwork was originally published in the 1950's and you can tell - very emblematic of that time. Quite a lovely gift book; some classics could serve as read alouds during a storytime.
  • (5/5)
    I love Child's Garden of Verses and have several copies with different illustrations. This one is one of my favorites with illustrations by George Trimmer. My favorites are The Cow, The Swing, The Land of Counterpane, and My Shadow.
  • (4/5)
    This is a must have book for every library. I recently purchased one for my own. I had this book read to me over and over again as a child and was told not too long ago that it was one of my mother's favorites. If an adult can read something to a child "over and over" and still keep it as a favorite, it must be great- right? My favorite poem is still "how I love to go up so high on my swing..."
  • (5/5)
    Two of my favorite poems are in this book. The swing poem and my shadow.
  • (3/5)
    I have mixed opinions of this collection of poems. I read this aloud to my older son several years ago and he loved the poems, he even memorized several of them. He especially had fun memorizing My Shadow. I've just now finished reading it to my 8yo and have to say he was not impressed. We read a two-page spread every school day as part of our homeschool. Though the poems are written for children, they are written for Victorian children and the 8yo didn't understand half of the words used so we spent a lot of time discussing what each poem was really about and how it applied to things he would recognize in his life today. Sometime he'd think the poem was OK and he didn't dread me reading it but mostly he just thought they were boring. Myself, there are several of the popular poems that I think are wonderful: Bed in Summer, My Shadow, and Picture Books in Winter especially. Some others I'd rather do without.This edition is particularly nice as it is profusely illustrated with sometimes several pictures per poem by contemporary children's book artists of the time such as Jessie Wilcox Smith and C.M. Burd along with a host of others. I just love the illustrations and could pull this book off the shelf and just browse through it for pure enjoyment. The 8yo though did not appreciate the old-fashioned pictures especially when he couldn't tell the boys from the girls. However, this is poetry I think every child should be exposed to, some will enjoy, others will not. For one, my son will forever remember the name "Robert Louis Stevenson".
  • (5/5)
    This is a personal favorite book of poetry from my childhood. I treasure this book, share it with my grandchildren and will leave it to Damon when I pass. Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    There is a reason Robert Louis Stevenson is so well-remembered. He had a knack for finding the right word in the right place, and his poems about childhood always hit the right spot.The illustrations in this book complement the rhymes perfectly.Please note that this edition is oversized, and it may be difficult to put on your bookshelf.
  • (5/5)
    The poems in this edition are selected for the modern child from Stevenson's popular collection. I had these poems memorized as a child, and loved reading them to my own children. Now, here's a shorter version that my grandkids can enjoy. The poems are beautifully illustrated with paintings that evoke those same feelings of childhood as the poetry does. What a wonderful introduction to both poetry and painting!
  • (4/5)
    Summary:A great book of classic poetry that describes what children do during the day, listening to their elders and being thankful for what they have. This is a classic book with wonderful drawings by Eloise Wilkin to go along with the very 1950's style poetry. For example: "A child should always say what's true, and speak when he is spoken to, and behave mannerly at table: at least as far as he is able." Review:I loved this book as a child but did not read it to my kids. It is really outdated but I love the pictures and find that I am drawn to anything Eloise Wilkin put her hands on. I also have the version of Hilda Boswell's illustrations that are similar but have a different quality. These books will always be around because they are classics but every verse may not be read to children because the parents may have different views of a child's role in the world being much more active than passive.
  • (5/5)
    Great poems about childhood. They remind me of how I felt as a child. With wonder at every corner.
  • (2/5)
    Pretty boring and lacking in any evidence of technical ability. But occasionally cute, I guess.
  • (5/5)
    Outstanding poetry for kids and their parents, this edition is the most delightfully illustrated (by Gyo Fujikawa).
  • (5/5)
    Belonged to Gramma Spray. She inscribed it and gave it to my daughter in 1991.
  • (5/5)
    While trying to get some semblance of order for my books, I found this rare gem. Copyrighted in 1900, the paper is older and semi glossy; the illustrations are simple and lovely. My copy is in poor condition, but none of the pages are missing.It was incredibly delightful to spend time savoring each delightful poem. While simply written, each sentence paints a lush portrait of serenity and reminds the reader of a childhood of dreams and time spent exploring through the imagination. Many of the missives contain images of night and sleeping. Here is one of my favorites:North-West PassageWhen the bright lamp is carried in,The sunless ours again begin;O'er all without, in field and lane,The haunted night returns again.Now we behold the embers fleeAbout the firelit hearth; and seeOur faces painted as we pass,Like pictures, on the window-glass.Must we go to bed indeed? Well then,Let us arise and go like men,And face with an undaunted treadThe long black passage up to bed.Farewell, O brother, sister, sire!O pleasant party round the fire!The songs you sing, the tales you tell,Till far to-morrow, fare ye well!
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed the poem called The Swing recalled from childhood.
  • (3/5)
    A Child’s Garden of Verses (Ages 4-8) by Robert Louis Stevenson is an unabridged collection of 61 poems evoking the world and feelings of childhood based on Stevenson's earliest memories. The anthology includes seasonal verses, bedtime rhymes, and poems of make-believe adventures, as well as an index. The illustrations are antique pictures by twenty well-known children's book illustrators, published between 1896 (Charles Robinson) and 1940 (Ruth Mary Hallock) and include Jessie Willcox Smith, Henrietta Willebeek Le Mair, and Willy Pogany's enchanting cover/end papers. Most of the art work has more sentimental appeal to adults and may be less captivating to children. Perhaps since these poems are perennial classics, they do come off as clichéd and patronizing, approaching childhood by looking down on it in a sentimental and nostalgic way. The rhyme of many of the poems sounds contrived and cloying, and the rhythms can soporific in their monotony. Thus, A Child’s Garden of Verses is one of those classic poetry anthologies adults think children should read, but probably will have limited appeal for its young readers.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoy this book more than the rating would imply. I had an abridged copy that I read for years, and this is my first crack at a larger version with different illustrations and more poems. I would say how much one enjoys this book is dependent on personal taste. The poems are calm, for the most part, and the settings are largely pastoral and idyllic. Many of the poems are based on a child's observations of the world, and how it might change from different physical perspectives, or imaginary ones. This is a collection that ultimately encourages imagination. It's good reading for bedtime, or to a quiet or calm child that likes to read or think.