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The Ocean at the End of the Lane: A Novel

The Ocean at the End of the Lane: A Novel

Escrito por Neil Gaiman

Narrado por Neil Gaiman


The Ocean at the End of the Lane: A Novel

Escrito por Neil Gaiman

Narrado por Neil Gaiman

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (839 valoraciones)
Longitud:
5 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jun 18, 2013
ISBN:
9780062255686
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

Sussex, England. A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. He is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock. He hasn't thought of Lettie in decades, and yet sitting by the pond (a pond that she'd claimed was an ocean), the unremembered past comes flooding back. Forty years earlier, a man committed suicide in a stolen car at this farm at the end of the road. Like a fuse on a firework, his death lit a touchpaper and resonated in unimaginable ways. The darkness was unleashed, something scary and thoroughly incomprehensible to a little boy. And Lettie—magical, comforting, wise beyond her years—promised to protect him, no matter what.

A groundbreaking work from a master, The Ocean at the End of the Lane is told with a rare understanding of all that makes us human, and shows the power of stories to reveal and shelter us from the darkness inside and out. A stirring, terrifying, and elegiac fable as delicate as a butterfly's wing and as menacing as a knife in the dark.

Editorial:
Publicado:
Jun 18, 2013
ISBN:
9780062255686
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro


Sobre el autor

Neil Gaiman is a #1 New York Times bestselling author of books for children and adults whose award-winning titles include Norse Mythology, American Gods, The Graveyard Book, Good Omens (with Terry Pratchett), Coraline, and The Sandman graphic novels. Neil Gaiman is a Goodwill Ambassador for UNHCR and Professor in the Arts at Bard College.

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4.3
839 valoraciones / 502 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    A man revisits his childhood memories - and what memories they are. They involve moving to a new house, a bizarre babysitter, the girl who lives down the road and an epic battle. Was it all in his imagination - that's up to the reader to decide. Parts of this story read like a delightful fairy tale where a little boy meets a fantastical and mysterious family of women (Grandmother, mother and the little girl daughter) and finds out that the odd behavior of his baby sitter is due to her being an evil entity bent on destruction. However some of the content is definitely for mature audiences only. Gaiman also pushes the envelope as he explores how parents can get caught up in their own foibles and not pay attention to what is really threatening their children. My verdict: It provided great fodder for discussion and was a very vivid and creatively constructed story.
  • (3/5)
    A little bit creepy. It was interesting as an audiobook.
  • (4/5)
    I liked this one better than the last Gaiman I read (Stardust), but I am still not all too much into Gaiman. I can understand why people would like his style, but it is just not for me. I think I'll live and let live and just read another author instead of trying to find a Gaiman I really like (unless someone can recommend a specific Gaiman book that they think I would like).
  • (5/5)
    I am not normally much of a fan of fantasy novels, and over the years, I've read very few of them. But I've been curious about the work of Neil Gaiman for a long time, and that curiosity finally got the best of me. Thank goodness."The Ocean at the End of the Lane" hooked me from the start, and I couldn't wait to find out what had happened to the story's lead character all those years ago - even though he wasn't entirely sure himself what drew him back to visit his old childhood neighbors after so many years. Eventually, all is revealed even though the young man leaves the "ocean" at the end of the lane perhaps not much wiser about his past than he was when he arrived. I really enjoyed this story of one little boy who managed to survive everything thrown at him by the monsters, fleas, and varmits that wished him harm. But my big discovery about Neil Gaiman is that he is one of the most entertaining audiobook readers that I've ever experienced. This man can tell a story like few others in the business, and I'm going to be listening to him read more of his work soon.(In fact, I just started listening to his short story collection titled "Trigger Warning." Can't wait.)
  • (4/5)
    Who would think that a few days out of one's childhood could be this gripping and bizarre? Gaiman presents readers with a young boy as the center of this novella, but he is surrounded by powerful, enchanting, and devilish females.
  • (5/5)
    Loved it - just like all the other Gaiman books. Seriously though - the whole concept of the story enchanted me.
  • (3/5)
    “I liked that. Books were safer than other people anyway.”“I lived in books more than I lived anywhere else.”Those two quotes very much represent me, most days! This was a decent read, with the beginning third holding my interest much more than the rest. Fantasy isn't always my cup of tea, but the warmth of the writing, plus the brevity of the story, kept me in the game. That, and the kindness and confidence of the Hempstock women. A nice, short read!
  • (4/5)
    Gaiman is a favorite listen, he has a lovely voice. His horror mixed with nostalgia style can be unsettling, but I assume it's meant to be. He draws upon his own childhood for a layered story of memory and perception of a seven year old boy with a creepy family and kindly neighbors.
  • (3/5)
    Reminds me of Ray Bradbury very much.
  • (3/5)
    This was okay, but I did not particularly like the direction that the main plotline headed. I was expecting something different from Gaiman, having highly admired his other works. Nevertheless, I am still glad I read it.
  • (3/5)
    It's a beautifully written book with some very evocative text, but the ending rather spoilt it for me (though that may not be problem for many readers). The book is written in the first person, past tense throughout, but the last page makes a nonsense of that. How can a story be written in the first person, if the narrator has forgotten most of it?
  • (5/5)
    This was my first time reading Gaiman, and this novella was really wonderful. I've added several more of his books to my To Read list. Recommended.
  • (5/5)
    FANTASTIC. Listen to it. Amazing storytelling.
  • (3/5)
    This is my first Neil Gaiman book. I'm left not feeling the wow and awe others felt at this story. In a lot of ways it was mashed up and confusing until the end. The ending was beautiful in many ways. I enjoyed how the idea of memory was handled.
  • (4/5)
    Story that takes the reader back to the early childhood, where a 7 year old has miraculous adventures intertwined with his daily life. A suicide, a bad nanny, a departure of a friend, all become the reflection of mysterious and magical forces in the common world. Dark at places, optimistic overall, a nice read to remind of childhood.
  • (3/5)
    It was OK, but didn't like it that much!
  • (4/5)
    I read this in one sitting. As I predicted, Gaiman's words of imagination awed me.
  • (2/5)
    This book just didn't have the same charm as his other works. Forgettable.
  • (4/5)
    This novel is going to stick with me like the best kinds of short stories, which I think comes from Gaiman's original short-story intentions. There are certain scenes, like in all the Gaiman books I've read, that are just REALLY weird, and they are going to pop into my thoughts at inopportune moments, so thanks for that, Neil Gaiman. The 4 instead of 5 stars is because this book left me somewhat uneasy during and after I read it. I didn't like the uncomfortableness, and I think it may have something to do with the uncomfortableness of the truths Gaiman was trying to tell. But there are also some great passages and lines and ideas about the nature of things, and particularly the nature of people, and childhood, that rang so true for me. (That was a run-on. Oh well.) What is the different between a child and an adult? Is an adult still the same person as the child they used to be? If something happened, but you don't remember it, does it affect who you are? If something didn't happen, but you remember it, does it still matter? What is a monster? Are monsters less monstrous if they get scared of something higher on the food chain? Who are we, really? These are questions fundamental to growing up and being a human. And they are answered, or at least raised, by the adventures of a 7-year-old who gets mixed up in some magical goings-on at the end of his lane.

    The narrator is never named, but reading (and listening to) Neil Gaiman's words gave me the distinct impression that this boy IS Neil Gaiman, or at least an imagined, magical-adventure-going version of 7-year-old Neil Gaiman. Who knows, maybe everything in the book is a real-world fact, and that's why Gaiman writes the books he does. It felt very personal, and with lots of details that I'm sure are real-life about England and growing up on this particular lane.

    I got this book at the signing in Portland, and I also picked up the audio book. I started and finished the book in paper, but listened to the middle on audio book - read by Gaiman himself. I have to say the audiobook experience was more enjoyable. Maybe because it was so clearly Neil Gaiman as a child, him reading it just made more sense then me trying to read a first-person narrative about a boy totally different from myself on the surface...but this book does dredge up the many ways humans are alike at the core. I wasn't trying to put myself into his shoes, as I feel many YA authors try to force in their first person narratives. But even still, I felt a connection with the narrator as a more complex person, and the human universals were made even more apparent when I wasn't trying to find them. And that is the trick of this book: it tells you things you didn't think you needed to hear, things you weren't expecting, and things that you're going to have to think about for many more years since Neil Gaiman has had 30 more years to think about things.
  • (5/5)
    The day of his father's funeral, a man starts driving randomly between the end of the funeral and start of the post-funeral reception at his sister's house. He winds up in the neighborhood they lived in as kids, and specifically he winds up not where they house they lived in was, at the top of the lane, but at the end of the lane.

    At the old farmhouse where Letty Hempstock lived.

    And he starts remembering long-buried events of his childhood. That Letty always said that the quiet little pond near her house was in fact an ocean is the least surprising of those memories.

    This is an utterly charming little story, terrifying in all the right places. The Hempstocks are a remarkable family, but the narrator, while young, naive, and lacking in sold knowledge of the fantastic, proves to have a strength of character unsuspected even by himself.

    A very rewarding, quiet read. Recommended.
  • (5/5)
    Wow. Deep and gentle and frightening and vicious and amazing. I will own this book, it needs to be a part of my life for the forever from now on.
  • (3/5)
    Had the details been less scary, this would make a better MG book. I did like the story and the suspense well enough, but was disappointed in the lack of explanation in the end.
  • (5/5)
    This is written with a beautiful sense of innocence, even in its darkest moments. The book enfolds you, so gently you don't notice until you see how many pages you have read. A unique and unusual story that will take you to unexpected places.
  • (4/5)
    This is a truly melancholy book, the mood is so sad throughout the book - even when it is wonderful and amazing it is also so so sad. It does feel like a book that is baring it's soal at you. I liked it alot.
  • (5/5)
    Easily the best book I've read in years. Hauntingly beautiful.
  • (5/5)
    I really loved this. It was very quirky and easy to read. In a way, it reminded me of "The Little Prince". I would for sure recommend this book.
  • (4/5)
    Another great novel by Gaiman! I listened to the audio version which he narrated himself and it was wonderful to listen to. Gaiman is fast becoming one of my favourite authors.
  • (5/5)
    I don't know why I cried all through the epilogue but there you have it.
  • (4/5)
    3.5/5 stars
    This book was very good. It was very atmospheric and creepy and I just had to keep reading. I really enjoyed the world Gaiman created with Lettie and the main character (who I'm pretty sure, we never actually find out his name?, I can't remember it if we did), was quite magical. It was imaginative and fun, and believable.

    I enjoyed the characters and the mystery behind Lettie and her family. They were all well developed and I thought they were written well. They were quite likeable and realistic. The "villain," Ursula was also just so creepy! I kind of kept reading because I wanted to read the resolution of the story before I went to sleep, so I wouldn't have weird dreams about it.

    I did feel like something was missing, as I was reading, but I cannot put my finger on it. I think it was just that it was so short.

    Overall, quite enjoyable, with a very atmospheric writing style, with just enough whimsy and magic.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing not just because NG wrote it (though that is part, I'll admit) but because I'm pretty sure I've met Hempstock women.
    With this story, he's described my ideas of magic very well (not pretty necessarily, but utilitarian to the correct persons). The storyteller needs not be identified, because he is all of us.

    Have re-started the book.
    Thanks NG.