Encuentra tu próximo/a audiolibro favorito/a

Conviértete en miembro hoy y escucha gratis durante 30 días
Necessary Lies: A Novel

Necessary Lies: A Novel

Escrito por Diane Chamberlain

Narrado por Alison Elliott


Necessary Lies: A Novel

Escrito por Diane Chamberlain

Narrado por Alison Elliott

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (41 valoraciones)
Longitud:
10 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Sep 3, 2013
ISBN:
9781427232922
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro

Descripción

Bestselling author Diane Chamberlain delivers a breakout book about a small southern town fifty years ago, and the darkest—and most hopeful—places in the human heart

After losing her parents, fifteen-year-old Ivy Hart is left to care for her grandmother, older sister and nephew as tenants on a small tobacco farm. As she struggles with her grandmother's aging, her sister's mental illness and her own epilepsy, she realizes they might need more than she can give.

When Jane Forrester takes a position as Grace County's newest social worker, she doesn't realize just how much her help is needed. She quickly becomes emotionally invested in her clients' lives, causing tension with her boss and her new husband. But as Jane is drawn in by the Hart women, she begins to discover the secrets of the small farm-secrets much darker than she would have guessed. Soon, she must decide whether to take drastic action to help them, or risk losing the battle against everything she believes is wrong.

Set in rural Grace County, North Carolina in a time of state-mandated sterilizations and racial tension, Necessary Lies tells the story of these two young women, seemingly worlds apart, but both haunted by tragedy. Jane and Ivy are thrown together and must ask themselves: how can you know what you believe is right, when everyone is telling you it's wrong?

A Macmillan Audio production.

Editorial:
Publicado:
Sep 3, 2013
ISBN:
9781427232922
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro


Sobre el autor

Diane Chamberlain is the bestselling author of twenty novels, including The Midwife's Confession and The Secret Life of CeeCee Wilkes. Diane lives in North Carolina and is currently at work on her next novel. Visit her Web site at www.dianechamberlain.com and her blog at www.dianechamberlain.com/blog and her Facebook page at www.facebook.com/Diane.Chamberlain.Readers.Page.


Relacionado con Necessary Lies

Audiolibros relacionados
Artículos relacionados

Reseñas

Lo que piensa la gente sobre Necessary Lies

4.6
41 valoraciones / 46 Reseñas
¿Qué te pareció?
Calificación: 0 de 5 estrellas

Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    Book was interesting, a subject I have not read much about.. Writing was ok, an easy read.
  • (4/5)
    Set in rural Grace County, North Carolina in 1960, in a time of state-mandated sterilizations and racial tension, Necessary Lies tells the story of Jane Forrester and Ivy Hart. Newly married to a successful pediatrician, Jane rejects tradition when she takes a job as a social worker instead of becoming a housewife. Jane is not at all prepared for her new career, but she is enthusiastic and dedicated to her clients. Ivy is mature beyond her years but also quite innocent and naive. She's the one that takes the caretaker role with her diabetic grandmother and two year old nephew. Jane decides to fight to protect Ivy from the system that is supposed to protect her which leads to life changing consequences for everyone involved.

    I never knew a Eugenics Program existed in the United States. The Eugenics Program was a way the states used to sterilize people, may of them without their own consent. In most states, this program was predominantly used for the institutionalized. However, residents of North Carolina were able to be sterilized based on petitions written by their social workers. This system became a way for people living on welfare to be prohibited from having too many children. It was tragic that such a system could be allowed, and equally tragic that social workers felt they were doing the best they could to improve the life of their clients.

    Told in first person from alternating points of view, I thought it was a powerful and thought-provoking novel that paints a vivid portrait of poverty, sexism, racism and social work in rural North Carolina in 1960.
  • (4/5)
    Might have given it a 5 but the ending didn't sit well with me. But it was a read that was hard to put down. The audio is well-read also.
  • (5/5)
    Really enjoyed this audio book. Story based on truth. Heart breaking truth.
  • (5/5)
    I am late to the Diane Chamberlain fan club. I have heard others rave about her books, but haven't read any until now. I can't wait to be sucked in to another one of her books. If you like books that are written around a moral or ethical issue than this book is for you.In NECESSARY LIES, we are taken to the south in the 1960's. The area is full of tobacco farmers and poverty stricken families like the Harts. Ivy Hart is a fifteen-year-old who has the weight of the world on her shoulders. She helps take care of Nonnie, her elderly and diabetic grandma, her older sister, Mary Ella and Mary Ella's son, William. They all live in a shack on a tobacco farm that they also work on. After the family's current social worker breaks her leg, Jane, a newlywed who lives a much more privileged life with her doctor husband, is assigned to the family. As Jane learns the role of being a social worker she is introduced to the Eugenics Sterilization Program, the sterilization of women who are deemed unfit to have children.Jane has concerns about the sterilization program and her questions to the department are met with anger and a direct order to fill out the necessary forms. Jane's husband, Robert is not happy about the fact that she is working and is worried about how that will appear to his professional friends. Jane ends up feeling alone and confused as she realizes she can't talk to her husband about her job and the concerns she has about the Eugenics Program. As she gets to know Ivy and Mary Ella, Jane becomes emotionally involved in their lives. When Jane finds out secrets about the family and their lives on the tobacco farm, she has to decide if she is willing to risk her job and maybe her marriage to help Ivy and her family.The very first chapter of NECESSARY LIES grabbed me and pulled me right on through the book rather quickly. I am ashamed to admit that I had never heard of the Eugenics Program before and Chamberlain shared both sides of the issue through each character's opinions. Reading along, you will be wrestling with your own opinions on welfare, social work, poverty, and sterilization. Chamberlain definitely gives you topics for discussion. This was our book club choice this month and we had plenty to discuss. I had so many favorite lines from the book, it felt like I was highlighting all the time. I'll feature just a few of my favorites:"Well, I think when we lose somebody, maybe we owe it to that person to remember them. To hold on to the good memories." I thought about that for a minute and liked what she said. Nobody wanted to be forgotten. Page 126"There are too many silly rules in our lives," she said, "and our lives are far too short to pay attention to them." Page 199"Sometimes, coloring outside the lines can cost you," she said. "Only you can figure out if it's worth it." Page 305Chamberlain took great care researching the time period, location, tobacco farming, and the Eugenics program. The reader will have a hard time believing this is a fictional story since the characters and their struggles seem so real. Ivy is completely devoted to her family and to her one true love, Henry. Ivy and Henry must be very careful with their relationship and even though you know it is forbidden, you want to root for their happiness. I cringed every time Robert criticized Jane and am thankful I grew up in a different era of marriage. I also understood Jane's emotional attachment to the Hart family. As a former social worker, there are clients that you feel more compelled to help and you naturally get emotionally involved. Jane took that to a whole new level in NECESSARY LIES and kept the reader guessing what would happen next. Chamberlain keeps you on the edge of your emotions with numerous surprises throughout the story. She kept me questioning my original opinions and frequently drying my tears. I have no doubt that book clubs, readers of social justice issues, and those who love historical fiction will find NECESSARY LIES to be a compelling story and one they won't soon forget.
  • (4/5)
    Thank you First Reads for the opportunity to read this book, my first by Diane Chamberlain!

    Two girls names are carved into the wall of a closet where they have remained for decades, unpainted or covered. How did they get there? What happened to the girls? Those are questions that this novel answers. Diane Chamberlain uses her background in social work to tell the heartbreaking story of impoverished people in North Carolina during 1960s, the role of the social worker, and of the statewide sterilization program. She uses multiple perspectives to tell a well-wounded story that leaves no angle unexplored. Her writing holds no bars and exposes life in the 1960s as it was. This is a novel with a story to tell that will leave you breathless by its stark honesty, while also leaving you with hope in humanity.
  • (4/5)
    Ivy Hart is only fifteen years old, but for the past two years of her life she's had to take care of her older sister, Mary Ella, her grandmother - Nonnie, and her sister's son, Baby William. She's also had to help take care of the house, work in the tobacco fields, and attend school. Even with all she does, her family has very little to survive on. Her grandmother has high blood pressure and diabetes, her sister is most like mildly mentally retarded, her two-year-old nephew only says a few words, and she suffers from epilepsy. Ivy's father died when she was five and shortly after that her mother was admitted to a local mental hospital for viciously attacking a local woman. The only thing good is Ivy's life is her friendship/romance with Henry Allen, the son of the farmer that owns their home and the tobacco farm. She and Henry Allen dream of leaving North Carolina and heading out West to California. Jane Forrester is an idealist and decades ahead of her time. She's a new graduate from college, a newlywed and a new hire in the North Carolina Department of Public Welfare as a social worker. In the South of 1962 it isn't seemly for the wife of doctor to work as social worker and Jane's husband feels she should be dedicating her time and energy to charitable work and their new home. Before she even starts work her job is a bone of contention between the newlyweds, but her husband reluctantly agrees that she can give it a try. Jane isn't ignorant of poverty or despair but she's never seen up close and personal, and the few weeks on the job teach her that very few in her department see their "clients" as human beings with needs, dreams and desires. These are just people that need to be subjected to more rules and regulations to keep them subjugated. One such rule that Jane has problems with is the principle of "eugenics" or sterilization that the department feels is a way to curb "certain people" from procreating. Regrettably, Ivy Hart fits the criteria for inclusion in this program and her grandmother and the local visiting nurse agree. Only Jane is willing to question the program and the way her department makes decisions for these people without any thought or regard to their own desires or dreams. Needless to say, Jane's attitude causes a lot of problems within her department and with her husband.Ms. Chamberlain has crafted an intense story that provides a glimpse into our not-so-distant history with the eugenics program and its guidelines in the state of North Carolina. By having a person of authority, Jane Forrester, interact with people affected by the program, Mary Ella and Ivy, Ms. Chamberlain has provided a voice to the dissent against this program and the adverse affects the program caused. Although this is a highly emotional tale, I found it to be an interesting and fast read. After awhile it felt like I was witnessing people from the past rather than reading about fictional characters. There's a lot of drama and sadness in Necessary Lies, but there's also love, hope and perseverance. Ms. Chamberlain doesn't sugarcoat the adversities faced by Ivy Hunt or any of her neighbors. The picture provided of the poverty and despair isn't harsh or overly ugly but presented in a truthful and respectful manner. I thoroughly enjoyed reading Necessary Lies and can highly recommend it to anyone that enjoys reading fiction based on true historical events.
  • (5/5)
    I live in North Carolina and was aware of the issue of eugenics due to newspaper articles in the last few years. I moved to NC in 1973 and remember the days that the fields were full of tobacco plants and people working tobacco. Those days are gone thanks to decreasing demand for cigarettes. I live near Greensboro and graduated from University of NC in Greensboro - which was originally Women's College, where Jane graduated before becoming a social worker. So much of this novel was very familiar to me. The author did a fantastic job of making the setting for her story very true to life. But more important than the setting was the story itself. She took a very sensitive and disputed topic and put a face to it. Its one thing to discuss what is wrong with eugenics but it makes it so much more real to think about it with Ivy and Mary Ella. Even though they are fictional characters, they represent many of the women of this time period. The story was very real and I'm sure that similar stories were played out all over the country during this time period. I tend to judge my books by how long I think about them after I finish reading them and how many people I recommend them to. I have recommended this book to everyone I know and continue to think about the story and the characters days after I finished the book. I read a lot of books (125-30 a year) and this one has affected me more than many of the other books I have read this year. I think it would be a very good book for a book club to read and discuss.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book, I couldn't put it down!
  • (5/5)
    Necessary LiesNecessary Lies by Diane Chamberlain My rating: 5 of 5 stars Necessary Lies by Diane Chamberlain is a St. Martin's Press publication, released in September 2013.Jane is a young, idealistic, woman, newly married to a doctor, but going against the convention of the day by maintaining employment. But, she doesn't have just any job, she is a social worker in the field. Set in south, during the fifties, Jane wants to be more than a just a mother and a member of the Junior League. She really wants to help people. Her husband, however, is dead set against it. He initially humors her, but is very embarrassed that his wife is working outside the home and not only that, she rubs elbows with those living in the worst poverty areas and may even have to go inside "colored" people's homes.One of the families Jane is responsible for is the Hart family. The grandmother, suffering with diabetes and arthritis, is raising her two teenage granddaughters. Mary Ella, the oldest became pregnant at age fourteen. Now, they have another mouth to feed. So, to prevent any further pregnancies, Mary was sterilized and told she had to have an appendectomy.Ivy, only fifteen, is also considered "slow", and she has epilepsy. Her grandmother and the social workers fear Ivy may also become pregnant and are pushing paperwork through at lightning speed to have her sterilized as well. Ivy also would have no clue about what the surgery really was.Once Jane becomes more involved with the family and bonds with Ivy, she begins to think the forced sterilization is not right for her. Jane hates the lies these girls have been told. They should at least be told the truth. But, to rob a young girl of the chance to marry and have a family of her own without her knowledge was more than Jane could bear.Jane finds herself fighting her social circle, the one her husband desperately wishes she would become a part of, and of course her selfish husband who hates her having a job and belittles her regularly and complains continuously about it. She does make one friend though, and is inspired by her to continue with her job.Jane also must fight the social services employees. Her boss and supervisors are furious with her because she is dragging her heels on Ivy's paperwork and she has become too emotionally involved with the family.I wish I could say that all the things that took place in the book was a figment of the author's imagination, but we know that these sterilizations did actually take place. Initially, these were done to the very poor white women, and even some men, but eventually, the majority of these sterilizations were done to poor black women. To some of these women, it was a blessing, but mostly these sterilizations were not something these women chose to do, or were correctly informed about.The story of Ivy was something that could really have happened. Of course, you can't help but think of Nazi Germany when you read this book. It's really hard to digest that people really thought this way.Not only was the story of Ivy and the Hart family realistic, but so was the attitude of most men about their wives working outside the home and having their own careers. The man felt his wife's whole world should evolve around him!!So, this is the set up. Jane is faced with heart and gut wrenching choices and decisions. While, this is not a mystery or suspense novel, I found myself on the edge of my seat. There are so many sad and tragic stories in this book, all due to extreme poverty, ignorance, prejudices, racism, and a society that condoned these actions.It takes a lot of courage to stand up and fight an entire system without any support from family, friends, or the community as a whole. But, that is just what Jane did. Her tenacity and internal strength to make the right decisions impacted so many lives for generations to come. Jane's life didn't really turn out like she had envisioned it, but she was given a life far more rewarding than if she had simply given in and given up. This is a very emotional read. There is sympathy, anger, fear, and sadness, but there is also a very uplifting and inspirational conclusion that will pull on the heart strings.I highly recommend this book for all fiction/literature readers. This would also appeal to historical fiction fan. This is a resounding A++ Necessary LiesNecessary Lies by Diane Chamberlain My rating: 5 of 5 stars Necessary Lies by Diane Chamberlain is a St. Martin's Press publication, released in September 2013.Jane is a young, idealistic, woman, newly married to a doctor, but going against the convention of the day by maintaining employment. But, she doesn't have just any job, she is a social worker in the field. Set in south, during the fifties, Jane wants to be more than a just a mother and a member of the Junior League. She really wants to help people. Her husband, however, is dead set against it. He initially humors her, but is very embarrassed that his wife is working outside the home and not only that, she rubs elbows with those living in the worst poverty areas and may even have to go inside "colored" people's homes.One of the families Jane is responsible for is the Hart family. The grandmother, suffering with diabetes and arthritis, is raising her two teenage granddaughters. Mary Ella, the oldest became pregnant at age fourteen. Now, they have another mouth to feed. So, to prevent any further pregnancies, Mary was sterilized and told she had to have an appendectomy.Ivy, only fifteen, is also considered "slow", and she has epilepsy. Her grandmother and the social workers fear Ivy may also become pregnant and are pushing paperwork through at lightning speed to have her sterilized as well. Ivy also would have no clue about what the surgery really was.Once Jane becomes more involved with the family and bonds with Ivy, she begins to think the forced sterilization is not right for her. Jane hates the lies these girls have been told. They should at least be told the truth. But, to rob a young girl of the chance to marry and have a family of her own without her knowledge was more than Jane could bear.Jane finds herself fighting her social circle, the one her husband desperately wishes she would become a part of, and of course her selfish husband who hates her having a job and belittles her regularly and complains continuously about it. She does make one friend though, and is inspired by her to continue with her job.Jane also must fight the social services employees. Her boss and supervisors are furious with her because she is dragging her heels on Ivy's paperwork and she has become too emotionally involved with the family.I wish I could say that all the things that took place in the book was a figment of the author's imagination, but we know that these sterilizations did actually take place. Initially, these were done to the very poor white women, and even some men, but eventually, the majority of these sterilizations were done to poor black women. To some of these women, it was a blessing, but mostly these sterilizations were not something these women chose to do, or were correctly informed about.The story of Ivy was something that could really have happened. Of course, you can't help but think of Nazi Germany when you read this book. It's really hard to digest that people really thought this way.Not only was the story of Ivy and the Hart family realistic, but so was the attitude of most men about their wives working outside the home and having their own careers. The man felt his wife's whole world should evolve around him!!So, this is the set up. Jane is faced with heart and gut wrenching choices and decisions. While, this is not a mystery or suspense novel, I found myself on the edge of my seat. There are so many sad and tragic stories in this book, all due to extreme poverty, ignorance, prejudices, racism, and a society that condoned these actions.It takes a lot of courage to stand up and fight an entire system without any support from family, friends, or the community as a whole. But, that is just what Jane did. Her tenacity and internal strength to make the right decisions impacted so many lives for generations to come. Jane's life didn't really turn out like she had envisioned it, but she was given a life far more rewarding than if she had simply given in and given up. This is a very emotional read. There is sympathy, anger, fear, and sadness, but there is also a very uplifting and inspirational conclusion that will pull on the heart strings.I highly recommend this book for all fiction/literature readers. This would also appeal to historical fiction fan. This is a resounding A++
  • (5/5)
    This novel takes place in North Carolina during the sixties. Then, it skips forward to the Twenty first century. The novel is amazingly honest about decisions made for poor people and people who suffer with an illness like Epilepsy or people with a low high IQ. During the sixties in the South, no one had any thought about special education or other programs to help these people become more responsible for themselves. Sadly, the answer for these women and their children was a Eugenics Program. Eugenics is thought of as a humane way to stop women from having more babies. Really, it's very inhumane. Jane, the Social Worker, is the only one who questions the decisions made by social workers and nurses. For example, Mary Ella who thinks slowly, is sterilized after she births Baby William. However, Mary Ella is told by the authority figures that her appendix burst. She is told this is the reason for the black stitches on her stomach. It takes a courageous Jane, a new Social Worker, to think about the fact that a lie can not be the right way to handle such a decision. Jane decides honesty is more important. However, what a bag of flies opens up when the truth is told to the people involved.All of the characters touched me in some way. There is Nonnie, a grandmother, Jane, the Social Worker, Mary Ella and Ivy who are sisters. Henry Allen Gardiner, Lita's family of boys who are Black and Mary Ella and Ivy's mother who never speaks a word in the novel but her presence is felt as it is revealed what happened to her along with the actions she chose to take while living in Grace County. Also, there is Jane's husband and Jane's mother.The novel, Necessary Lies by Diane Chamberlain, made my head spin with questions about social welfare.I thought about how difficult it is to make decisions for other people. Where does a person draw the line? At times I became very angry with Jane. I felt like she had gotten too involved with her clients. I thought she did make bad choices even though those choices were made for all the right reasons. Then again there didn't seem to be any other way to handle the situations unless she chose to sit back and hold her hands in her lap. I found it unbelievable that only Jane, no other social worker, had taken a fan to the family. Little comforts which make a large difference had been overlooked. It really touched my heart when Jane took the two girls to the beach on her day off. The sisters had never seen the ocean.However, towards the end Jane, the Social Worker, seemed as childlike as any fifteen year old. Bright ideas would come in her head. She would move forward without looking at the situation fully. I wanted to yell stop Jane! Think, for a moment think of the consequences. The Hart family see her as innocent or plain stupid when she does not know how to use the pump at the sink. When told to prime it, Jane does not know what to do. When she needs to use the outhouse, she thinks of toilet tissue. No idea that these people have never used toilet paper. They have only used pages from a catalogue like Sears and Roebuck.Although I've read the last page, my stomach is still churning, thinking about how much say should the Federal agencies have in our lives. When is it right to stop intruding and allow people to make their personal choices whether the choices lead to bad or good? These social workers left a lot of heavy mistakes behind on their way to straightening out the lives of the poor in Grace County. I think the county name Grace has a meaning in the novel. I also think Deaf Mule Road as a meaning in the novel. Diane Chamberlain does not waste words. Every word, every sentence and every paragraph was chunky with provoking thoughts. dianechamberlain
  • (5/5)
    In the early 1960's, newly wed and newly employed, Jane Forrester has, much to her husbands dismay, taken a job as a social worker. Everyday, she travels from her well to do neighborhood to tobacco fields and the poverty stricken people who work them. As a social worker she is to evaluate them, drop off clothes and address health issues to the agency's nurse. She must also select those who because of mental or physical deficiencies, should not reproduce. Jane gets personnaly involved with one particular family and goes way beyond the jobs requirements.I truly, truly loved this book. Why? Firstly, because it is of a subject I had no knowledge of, secondly, author's fictional characters come alive. So much so in fact I became just as involved with this family as Jane. The conclusion even brought me to tears. To supplement the reading of this book I also listened to the audio version and narrator Alison Elliott is outstanding! Whether print or audio I highly recommend it. It would have been a 5 star read it's just one particular thing troubled me towards the end of the story but it's minor.
  • (5/5)
    Sort of miserable topic in beginning of story, but becomes in-put-downable.
  • (5/5)
    I have not cried because of a book in a long time. I listened to this on books on CD and bawled my eyes out at many sections...In the beginning I thought this was a cookie cutter story. Not. So worth a read...Do yourself a favor...Listen, read, whatever-but have tissue handy.
  • (5/5)
    I was so glad there was an author's note about how Chamberlain came to write this incredible historical novel...truly a page turner. Beautifully written and as another reviewer noted---every word is important. How frightening that in the world we live in today there are so many aspects of this book that continue to be repeated.
  • (5/5)
    I discovered Diane Chamberlain recently and its been such a pleasure to read her novels. Necessary Lies follows Chamberlains amazing ability to build characters with complex relationships and life decisions while making the reader question their own social and political views and capacity for compassion and understanding.
  • (5/5)
    I received this ARC through Goodreads.
    The stories of Jane, a young social worker, and one of her clients Ivy, a pregnant 15 year old, are heart wrenching. Jane's struggles against the Eugenics program and her involvement in saving Ivy from sterilization proved her to be a very strong woman. She identified so much with Ivy as they had each lost father and a sister to accidents.
    This is a wonderful book, and I highly recommend it.
  • (4/5)
    This book takes place during a period of American History when a girl or woman could undergo sterilization surgery for mental or physical reasons if deemed necessary by the government. The plot revolves around a social worker who meets a grandmother with two granddaughters - one of which has had the surgery after having a baby as a young teenager. The story is driven by the attempt to save her sister from a similar fate. The premise is interesting and the book is well written but once she meets these girls it is as if her case load magically melts away allowing her to focus on them. Also, there is predictable trouble at home and in the workplace because of her passion. Worth reading but in most ways predictable.
  • (5/5)
    It is hard to believe that the characters in this book are fictional. The author made them seem so real to me. I had never heard of the Eugenics Sterilization Programme, and had no idea how many people had been steriised that way, and were lied to as well about what had been done to them. The programme sterilised those who were deemed unfit to have children, and care for them properly.The story features the Hart family - Mary Ella and her son William, Ivy and their grandmother Nonnie who looks after them. They are a poverty stricken family working on a tobacco farm in North Carolina. Into their lives comes Jane a case worker, well off and married to Robert, a doctor who does not want her to work. None of his friend's wives do and he feels this shows that he is not able to provide well enough for her, but Jane does not fit into his social circle at all and wants to work. Soon after Jane starts the case worker training her breaks her leg so Jane is given full responsibilty for the Hart family.Jane is not well suited for the job. She obviously cares for her clients and wants the best for them but she becomes too involved with them and breaks rules. And when she tries to undo the lies that have been told ie Mary Ella wa not sterilised she had her appendix taken out there are devastating consequences.This was a really gripping read and a heartbreaking story. Chamberlain gives the point of view of Jane, Ivy, and Mary Ella and even Robert, and is careful to present both sides of the sterilisation issue and leave the reader to make up their own mind. The characters are so well drawn and I really felt empathy for Jane stuck in marriage to Robert who could not understand what she wanted at all. And Ivy - her story was so compelling, fighting against being sterilised and wanting a life together with the father of her baby. She was the one who was doing her best to try and keep the family together. This is the best book by Chamerlain that I have read and the characters and their situations will stay with me for a long time.
  • (5/5)
    Wow. Set in 1960 in North Carolina, Jane is a new college grad who takes a social work job in rural Grace county. Married to a pediatrician, who really wants a stay at home wife, the marriage is off to a rough start. And when Jane gets involved in the poor tenant farmer families, with lots of hidden secrets, she gets herself fired. But when her client, 15 yo Ivy, is scheduled for sterilization under a eugenics law that she feels is absolutely morally wrong, she really puts herself in the middle of trying to do what's right. And what is right for Ivy?
  • (3/5)
    This was my first Diane Chamberlain book but was just OK for me. I was drawn to the book because it was set in the 1960s in North Carolina (southern fiction is one of my favorite genres) and involved the controversial Eugenics Board of North Carolina. I agree with others that the book was easy to read and moved along at a good clip, but I struggled to connect with the characters and the plausibility of the story. I know that the Eugenics Board existed - in fact North Carolina is just now in the process of making compensation payments to victims of its forced sterilization program. I also know now (after doing some research post-reading) that North Carolina was the only state that allowed social workers to designate people for sterilization. Hence, I can see why Ms. Chamberlain, as a former social worker, was drawn to writing this untold story. I just felt there was some character development lacking. Instead, I walked away from this book better educated by the crazy world around us (which is a good thing) but not necessarily emotionally touched. I hope to try another Diane Chamberlain novel in the future.
  • (4/5)
    This is a story of the interaction between a young social worker in her first job, full of dedication and concern for her clients but clearly inadequate yet to deal with the complexities of the family that becomes the focus of this novel. The novel deals with the issue of state-ordered sterilization of individuals deemed to be mentally defective, a practice that was carried on until remarkably recently in some states. The characters are well-drawn and the pacing of the story was perfect to keep me interested and engaged.
  • (5/5)
    I liked this book a lot. It would make a good book club read, about the eugenics program in NC: sterilizing men and women on welfare to reduce the welfare rolls.
  • (5/5)
    Ivy Hart is fifteen. Her parents are gone and she’s become the one looking after her grandmother, her older sister, and her nephew. Tenants on a small tobacco farm, their life is difficult and, although the women earn a pittance working in the tobacco field, the family survives only because of the welfare they receive.Jane Forrester is a new social worker for Grace County; despite her newlywed husband’s objection to her job, she soon becomes emotionally invested in the lives of her clients, particularly the Hart women. The more Jane learns, the more difficult it becomes for her to turn her back on the things she believes to be wrong even as her supervisor, Charlotte, explains the necessity of the decisions she and the others in the agency make. Will Jane become a heroine for Ivy, or is she destined to be the enemy? With well-drawn characters, the story delves into the issues of the time: discrimination, poverty, the marginalization of a segment of society. As the story unfolds, drawing readers into Ivy’s narrative and Jane’s story, tension builds around the seemingly-impossible and keeps the pages turning. Historically accurate, the narrative is set in North Carolina in the 1960s and focuses on the eugenics program and its impact, particularly on the disenfranchised women sterilized without their consent. It’s a powerfully-told story, one that will stay with the reader long after reaching the final page.Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

    This is a fast-paced book that kept me reading until I finished. It's set in 1960 with Jane, a social worker, starting her first job and her first marriage. Jane's focus is Ivy, a 15-year-old. Jane is expected to file papers to have Ivy sterilized. The Eugenics Program was a real program used to cut-down the number of people on welfare or for those with illness or low abilities by sterilizing sometimes without their knowledge. Jane struggles with how to do the right thing when almost everyone around her disagrees with her. The novel tells a compelling story, but I found it lacking beautiful language. The story was 5 stars, but the lack of imagery and vocabulary was 3 stars. However, it's a book I will readily recommend to others.

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

  • (5/5)

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

    If you don't know anything about NC history, you'll probably be horrified to hear that they were still practicing eugenics and forced sterilization in the 1960's. As a former social work student who loves reading books that deal with social issues, I picked this book up and didn't stop reading until I was finished. I can't say I enjoyed it, but I definitely loved it. It made me think, and it made me cry. Wow. Highly recommend!

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

  • (5/5)
    Author Diane Chamberlain takes us back to a time in history that is dark and disturbing. It is the south in the 1960’s. Jane Forrester is just on the brink of new life. Newly married, she is beginning her career as a social worker. She is well off, married to a pediatrician, and spends her days dealing with the problems of the poverty-stricken, poorly educated people of Grace County. Her husband is against her working and wives of his friends don’t like her. But Jane is driven to help her clients, even to the point of breaking the rules where she works. Getting too involved with her clients, especially with two families who are marginally connected with each other, June finds herself breaking more than just the rules. Just how far she is willing to go to protect a young girl illustrates just how caring she is. This compelling novel, based on historical fact, will have you questioning the rightness of certain laws. The author does an excellent job of speaking through different voice to tell this gripping tale. This is a story you will think about long after you have turned the last page.
  • (5/5)
    Even though Necessary Lies is a work of fiction, it’s an accurate account of the way the Eugenics Sterilization Program worked in North Carolina. I was shocked to learn that this barbaric program was in place up in until 1974. The characters in Grace county are typical of the kind of people who were affected by this horrifying program.I appreciated Jane’s struggle with the program, on the one hand wanting to be a good social worker, on the other hand not knowing if following the rules actually made her a good social worker. This book was also an eye-opening look of what it was like to be a woman in the 1960s. Jane’s doctor won’t prescribe her birth control pills without her husband’s permission!This book also did a good job of portraying the cycle of rural poverty and just how hard it to break as well. The author made me feel deep sympathy for Ivy and her family.This book was a compelling story with a couple of very surprising plot twists. It was extremely well-researched as well. Necessary Lies would be an excellent book club pick; you will want to discuss this book with somebody after you read it, if only to vent your frustration with North Carolina during this time period. This is the first book I’ve read by Diane Chamberlain and I’m looking forward to reading more by her. I highly recommend Necessary Lies.
  • (4/5)
    On occasion my daughter Kara reads and reviews a book for me...This is her latest review to be posted on Celticlady's Reviews...thank you Kara, your reviews are always appreciated!!Diane Chamberlain has never failed to tell a good story. Her latest novel, Necessary Lies, is no different.The synopsis on the jacket summarizes the story as this:After losing her parents, fifteen-year-old Ivy Hart is left to care for her grandmother, older sister and nephew as tenants on a small tobacco farm. As she struggles with her grandmother’s aging, her sister’s mental illness and her own epilepsy, she realizes they might need more than she can give.When Jane Forrester takes a position as Grace County’s newest social worker, she doesn’t realize just how much her help is needed. She quickly becomes emotionally invested in her clients' lives, causing tension with her boss and her new husband. But as Jane is drawn in by the Hart women, she begins to discover the secrets of the small farm—secrets much darker than she would have guessed. Soon, she must decide whether to take drastic action to help them, or risk losing the battle against everything she believes is wrong.Set in rural Grace County, North Carolina in a time of state-mandated sterilizations and racial tension, Necessary Lies tells the story of these two young women, seemingly worlds apart, but both haunted by tragedy. Jane and Ivy are thrown together and must ask themselves: how can you know what you believe is right, when everyone is telling you it’s wrong?As an avid Chamberlain fan, I always look forward to her new novels. I do prefer her older works, but this novel reminds me of her older works. A story told with deep plotlines, deep family relationships, complex yet simple characters, and as always, moral dilemmas.I love the setting of this book; 1960’s in the south, North Carolina no less. I was not alive during that time, but it is a period of time that holds much interest for me, especially the relationship between the whites and blacks at that time. Chamberlain does a great job not only accurately portraying it, but also showing that not everyone held the same racist beliefs. It’s also interesting to see that barely 50 years ago, women were still expected to cater to their husband’s every whim and Chamberlain does a great job showing her character Jane struggling between what is right and wrong and what she feels in her heart, in all aspects of her life. In her marriage, in her career, and according to her moral values.This book also speaks to me personally because my significant other is a social worker in the foster care program and it’s amazing to see how similar yet how different the system is from then and now. And Chamberlain takes great pains to show the atrocity that was the Eugenics program at that time.As always, Chamberlain delivers another great novel. I give this 4 out of 5 stars (simply because it was not my favorite novel of hers, but it is still a great book.
  • (5/5)
    Another fascinating book about the eugenics program in North Carolina this time told from the perspective of a new social worker who is appalled at the program. The first book I read on this subject was “Unfit by, Lara Cleveland Torgesen” which I found fascinating and I think both of these books should be read to really get a feel for what these poor women/young ladies/children went through.Jane may be a woman ahead of her time because the only respectable job for a lady was a school teacher or nurse especially when you are married to a pediatrician who really doesn’t want you to work. You surely don’t go to work as a social worker, working with the poor and god forbid the coloreds , it made me sick that her husband was more upset about her having to work with the coloreds and that she wasn’t there to have dinner waiting for him. I for one am so glad at how far we have come as women!We also meet Ivy Hart who is one of Jane’s clients Ivy is trying to keep her little family together even though she is only 15 years old herself. She takes care of her grandmother who has a problem with sugar which we now call diabetes and an older sister who has already had one illegitimate child but little William is the apple of everyone’s eye and they do try their best to take good care of him. But when Jane takes over as case worker everything changes, Jane makes a discovery and tells a secret that changes everything for the Hart family.I really liked this book, this was a new to me author and narrator and I enjoyed them both very much. I liked the authors writing style and I found the subject matter well handled. The characters in this book are nicely fleshed out and it gives us a frightening look into social work in the 1960’s in North Carolina, which was the one state that continued the eugenics program longer than any other state, so many women (and men) were sterilized just for being poor or colored, which I feel is horrifying. Narrator Alison Elliott did a really good job at portraying both of these women and I thought she added to the telling of this story I will definitely listen to her again.I will be looking for other books by this author.4 ½ Stars