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El Llamado De La Selva

El Llamado De La Selva

Escrito por Jack London

Narrado por Carlos J. Vega


El Llamado De La Selva

Escrito por Jack London

Narrado por Carlos J. Vega

valoraciones:
4/5 (75 valoraciones)
Longitud:
2 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2001
ISBN:
9781611553031
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

El mundo a traves de los ojos de un perro. La primera novela de Jack London, El Llamado de la Selva es una de esas obras unicas, en donde una serie de aventuras durante la fiebre del oro se ven a traves de la vision de un perro, de fidelidad unica, pero en el cual el llamado atavico de sus antepasados acaba triunfando. London estaba convencido de que la vuelta a la naturaleza, que en forma tan poderosa es en ultimas el tema de la novela, es el destino final de todo ser vivo. Es una obra llena de vida y de interes que no declina y por eso, es considerada basica dentro de la produccion de su autor. Es interesante ademas por que rompe con una cantidad de convenciones de la narrativa, entre ellas la de que no existe ningun romanticismo, sino que todo es descrito en forma impersonal.
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2001
ISBN:
9781611553031
Formato:
Audiolibro

Sobre el autor

Jack London was born in San Francisco in 1876, and was a prolific and successful writer until his death in 1916. During his lifetime he wrote novels, short stories and essays, and is best known for ‘The Call of the Wild’ and ‘White Fang’.


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  • (4/5)
    A terrific dog story, though hard to read at times because of all that Buck endures. I read it in the Library of America edition. Had never read it as a child as far as I recall; I note that some film versions are geared towards children and I can only assume (hope?) they have been bowdlerized; I wouldn't recommend this for children under 10 or 11 no matter their reading level.
  • (4/5)
    Synopsis.......The story takes place in the extreme conditions of the Yukon during the 19th-century Klondike Gold Rush, where strong sled dogs were in high demand. After Buck, a domesticated dog, is snatched from a pastoral ranch in California, he is sold into a brutal life as a sled dog. The novella details Buck's struggle to adjust and survive the cruel treatment he receives from humans, other dogs, and nature. He eventually sheds the veneer of civilization altogether and instead relies on primordial instincts and the lessons he has learned to become a respected and feared leader in the wild.Published back in 1903 after the author had spent sometime in the aforementioned Yukon.I was looking for something a little bit different and quick to read after getting bogged down by another book which I wasn't enjoying. I had previously heard of this book, hasn't everyone(?) but can't recall reading it ever during my near half-century of years, not even in the dim and distant days of school. Glad I made the effort though.Gripping, exciting, moving.......a testament of an indomitable spirit, bravery, determination, loyalty, fearlessness, and probably another dozen or so admirable attributes. Sad in places, but ultimately an uplifting and rewarding read.I wouldn't put it past me finding more from London in the future.4 from 5Down-loaded free from the internet.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this story. The writing was clever and well-crafted, the dog's story was interesting, and the themes of the power of instinct and love - in nature and in between a human and an animal - this was all well-done. It was a very different book from what I usually read. The voices and the characters are all male; the story seems to be targeted at young men or boys. It certainly wasn't a favourite. Even so, it is hard to deny that this is a classic, and I am glad I took the time to read it.
  • (4/5)
    The Call of the Wild by Jack London is a book I have long wanted to read, somehow missing this classic as a younger reader. Now that I have read it, I am glad that this was missed in my younger days as I don’t know if I would have been able to handle the animal cruelty that plays such a large part of this story. Maybe we were tougher years ago as many of the great animal classic stories like this one, Black Beauty and Beautiful Joe have many scenes that today would not be accepted in a children’s story.The story of Buck, being snatched from his easy life in California and being taken to work in the gold fields, shows him to be a special dog, dominant and intelligent, and, after finding out how cruel man can be, he learns to read both people and the situations that arise in his life. The story follows Buck as he is passed through various owners, some cruel, some indifferent and one that Buck learns to love. All the while, deep inside Buck comes a call, a desire to run free in the wilderness.At my much advanced age, I can now appreciate Jack London’s writing, especially when describing the Alaskan wilderness. The story is fast paced with excellent action sequences and overall I would class this a great read, if, and it’s a big if, you can face the brutality of what Buck goes through. The themes of like natured beasts calling out to each other, and the luring back to the primordial life that exists deep in memory are a little dated but overall this is a compelling read. London uses language like a poet, simple, at times savage but always rich in imagery.
  • (2/5)
    A romantic view of Alaska and the dogs that helped the early explorers and gold seekers open up the land to new settlers.
  • (3/5)
    The story is written from the perspective of Buck, the dog. He is large, he is faithful and pragmatic, and he is kidnapped by a worker on the ranch he lives on, and sold to a trader who sends him north to run with a team dragging sleds. Poor Buck is mistreated, and faces a hard run. It is not just humans who are cruel to him, other dogs resent his size and presence, and battles for position as alpha male take place. The dog team are run to the ground, and Bucks saving grace is his size, strength and stamina. He is passed to and from inept and cruel owners until he finally meets an owner he can trust and bond with.It's a nice, if somewhat violent, story. Nothing too deep, but a read that carries you along.
  • (5/5)
    Both of these tales (White Fang & Call of the Wild), one of a civilized dog who embraces the wild after he is stolen and one of a wild dog tamed by the love of a man...are both masterpieces that embrace the animal and flawed humanity in man and the the beasts that show us so and brave so much. Both are raw, emotional tales told in sparse, beautiful language that gnaw at you long after you put them down. First read at age 12, and enjoyed again as much at 41.
  • (3/5)
    This is one of those books that I might have read before and forgotten about it. This was a pretty good book, I think my favorite part was that I picked up a new vocabulary word because the author over used it... "virility."
  • (4/5)
    The Call of the WildYamamoto, MitsuAR Quiz # 30529 EN FICTIONIL: MG - BL: 5.5 AR Points 2.0AR Quiz Types RP, VPThoroughly enjoyed this retelling of the classic Jack London novel about Buck, part St. Bernard, part wolf and part super hero. I give it 4 stars and would recommend this book to all students and adults alike.I thought the graphics on each page were well done and helped readers visualize the rugged and difficult life Buck is thrown into without warning. He is abducted from a world of comfort on Judge Miller's farm, to a world where his survival depends on his instincts, guile and ability to adapt quickly to his changing circumstances.Fascinating that Mr. London could have written this novel in the early 1900's and the novel remains so timeless. I would hope that students today can still relate to such a beloved dog and the people and animals he meets along his journey to finding his true nature. It was fun to reread this inspirational story once again.I love the way good and evil are portrayed through both men and animals. I particularly liked watching Buck overcome these evils through both patience and his persistence until ultimately becoming a leader among the sled dogs.When Buck is befriended by John Thornton, we get lulled into a false sense of security thinking Buck will now be forever protected by this great man. But the greatest test of Buck's life is yet to come, and in the final climactic chapters, Bucks true superhero nature comes out as he defends his companion to the end.
  • (4/5)
    I followed up my recent reading of 'White Fang' with rereading of this earlier Jack London novel, and they made an interesting comparison. There was something slightly more anthropomorphic about 'Call of the Wild' and certainly more emphasis on the bond between Buck and his various human owners (especially his last owner John Thornton). The climax of this novel, where Buck finally answers the 'call' and joins the wild wolves, anticipates the 'White Fang' story which is darker and closer to nature. I would say that the writing is richer and more mature in 'White Fang' but some of the set-piece incidents here - such as Thornton's wager that Buck could singlehandedly break out a thousand pound sled load and pull it one hundred yards - are as exciting as I remember them as a boy reader.
  • (5/5)
    I think this is a very good book, like White Fang by Jack London.It contains action and how a house dogwolf can survive in the cold, harsh wilderness. I recommend the book to 5th graders andor up.
  • (4/5)
    As London might have put it, a rattling good yarn, and an extraordinarily interesting study of canine character. Buck, the pet dog of a wealthy family in central California, is kidnapped, sold, and transported to the Yukon to be used as a sled dog. He suffers at the hands of men and the paws (and teeth) of other dogs, but eventually emerges as a supreme sled dog. Then, he is saved from near death by a man he comes to love as his master, and lives and works with his master and his master's partners, who mine gold in the Canadian wilderness. More and more, however, he is drawn by "the call of the wild", the lure of a truly wild life as lived by wolves. Eventually, after his master is killed in an Indian attack, he follows the call.The book was written in 1903, and the style and context show it (interesting to remember that a big chunk of North America was a trackless waste that recently). As a dog story, however, it is remarkably up to date, focussing on the dog's inheritance from its wolf ancestors. That's just now being confirmed by genetic analysis, as is the fact that some dogs (like huskies) are genetically much closer to wolves than some other breeds. A great read for dog and adventure loving kids, but also a great read for this almost-70 New Yorker.
  • (4/5)
    I never got around to reading Jack London when I was younger, apparently missing out, as I have recently learned that most American high schoolers have London shoved down their throats at least once if not a half dozen times. I'm a bit glad I was spared the exercise because I don't think I would have appreciated it as much as I do now. I am sure one can say that about most books one reads in their younger years. The story of Buck is short but still very good. I wonder if there is an earlier book of seriousness and renown that was written from the view point of dog. The story is a bit odd for Jack London given his political views. Buck is a "king" and a protagonist. David Vann does a decent job illustrating this point in his introduction of the Folio Society edition. He also points out Buck's "Grendel" qualities near the end, which has the book ending on a bit of sad mystery, instead of a more upbeat "everyone lived happily ever after" conclusion. A few fine paragraphs stood out like this one:"There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive." These ruminations on the truth of nature confirmed for me that the 6 months Jack London spent traipsing around Alaska were not in vain.
  • (5/5)
    This novel is one of my favorite pieces of American literature. Set in the rugged and bitterly cold Yukon, London weaves a tale of adventure through the eyes of Buck, a St. Bernard/Retriever mix, as he is abducted from a relative dog life of luxury and made a beast of burden on a sled team during the Alaskan gold rush. As the book follows the owners in Buck's life, one sees how the environment of the Yukon makes survival of the fittest a physical as well as mentally challenging game. This is a great read for dog lovers, and adventurers young and old---a time worn classic.
  • (4/5)
    I read this with my husband. I dont like the racial undertones in Jack london's work. That aside, i wasnt all bad. My husband liked it. Of course he likes anything natureish
  • (3/5)
    My father gave this book to me as "one every man should read". I have to agree. There is something about the primal nature of this story, which follows the journey of a dog,that made me want to travel and become one with the earth. Although I enjoyed reading this novel, I would have liked to know more about the human characters rather than the dogs. Indeed the writing from the dog's perspective is great, but I usually find it easier to relate to humans.
  • (4/5)
    I think the author really expressed the virtue of loyalty in his book. Buck never left Thorton, and even after he died returned there every year. Another theme is survival of the fittest. The author creates many tests for Buck's strength and perseverance. Buck passed all these and the author made it clear. I would recommend this book to anyone.
  • (5/5)
    My third book by the author, and a possible reread (I remember some parts but not sure if I ever finished it).Basically the tale tells the life of Buck ( a Saint Bernard-Scotch shepherd dog) and the life he leads. At times harrowing, we follow Buck as he is stolen from a comfortable life and sold as a sledge dog. He rediscovers the primordial instinct for survival and endures all hardships put upon him. This includes being beaten by humans, driven to near death on the sledge and still having to fight for mastery over his fellows canines.Not exactly a light-hearted read with death on nearly every page, but an excellent representation of the attitudes of the early 20th century and the will to survive.Would I recommend it? Everytime.Would I reread it? One day.Am I glad I read it? Definitely
  • (4/5)
    Jack London centers his story on a dog by the name of Buck. Buck is a big, strong dog, his father being a St. Bernard and his mother being a Scottish shepherd dog. At one hundred and forty pounds, Buck was no mere house pet. Kept physically strong with a love of rigorous swimming and constant outdoor exercise, Buck was a lean, formidable dog. Undoubtedly, his great condition was part of the reason that the gardener's helper dog-napped and sold him to dog traders, who in turn sold him to Canadian government mail couriers. The gold rush in Alaska had created a huge demand for good dogs, which eventually led to the "disappearances" of many dogs on the West Coast. Buck was no exception. He was sold into a hostile environment, which was unforgiving and harsh. Although civilization domesticated him from birth, Buck soon begins almost involuntarily to rediscover himself, revealing a "primordial urge", a natural instinct, which London refers to as the Call of the Wild.
  • (1/5)
    I read this to help out my daughter who was assigned this book to read over the summer between sixth and seventh grade. I hated it. I wish they could have picked a better book. I could name 100 off the top of my head. My daughter is the greatest dog lover ever, she lives for dogs and this book was non stop violence against them. There were times that tears were pouring down her face. I think it's cruelty to make her read this book. All of the dogs die and in gruesome painful ways. If you are into reading about dogs being tortured then this is the book for you. After watching all of his friends drown Buck, the main dog character finally achieves a little kernel of happiness with the one person in the book who actually seems to care for dogs. Of course that is cruelly ripped away from him by some made up some blood thirsty Native Americans. Nice stereotype there. Other people are referred to as "half breeds". Not too PC. Thanks for tormenting school kids everywhere and making my daughter cry Jack London.
  • (4/5)
    This is the book telling the story of a dog named Buck. He is a magnifiicently strong animal that is stolen from his farm in California and sent off to the Yukon becoming a member of a dog sled team. The style of the story reminds a great deal of Black Beauty coming from the animal's POV. I wasn't sure what to expect and was pleasantly surprised at a fast paced tale.
  • (4/5)
    I have such a strong memory of reading this book in seventh grade - listening to my teacher talk about Buck, and paging through one of those hardbound school editions. After reading about this book on some literary blog, I re-read it in two nights while on a business trip, and loved it all over again.What to say?"An' dat Buck fight lak two hells," was Francios answer.
  • (4/5)
    This story is about a dog, named Buck. At first, he lived in Mr.Miller's house in Santa Clara Valley, but he was stolen by someone who wanted money. After he was stolen, he was bought by another man with a lot of money because he was very clever and strong dog which could work in the cold and snow of the north.But why he had to work in such place? Because men wanted to find gold and become rich!Buck confront a lot of danger..I felt I had to be more strong! Buck was very strong not only physically, but also mentally. And I also thought that animals love wild, and they have feelings like human. For example, if they were attacked by human, they feel bad and give them back biting or barking. I have a dog now, so I would like to cherish him more than before.
  • (5/5)
    At just 27, Jack London wrote [The Call of the Wild], a story that relied heavily on his young adventure in the very Klondike where most of the story is set. The novel is often categorized as a juvenile or young adult book because it is written from the perspective of a dog and because London is always spare and simple with his prose. But the dark, violent nature of the book and the underlying allegory regarding the instinctive uncivilized nature of all life allows for a much deeper reading. Buck, a St. Bernard and Scotch shepherd cross, is sold out from under his owner by a gardener to satisfy a gambling debt. Any memory of the dog’s mundane, pastoral is quickly beaten and whipped out of him. Sold into a life of brutal service as a sled dog during the Gold Rush days of the Klondike, Buck quickly becomes the lead dog in a team and begins to tap into his wild instincts. The balance between fearful obedience and instinctive, headstrong action begins to blur, until Buck is the master of his own survival. He eventually finds a human counterpart who respects and loves him as an equal, but the man is savagely killed by Yeehat Indians. When Buck avenges the man’s death, his transformation into a truly wild thing is complete.Reading about Buck’s transformation, I was reminded of D.H. Lawrence’s famous line, “I have never seen a wild thing sorry for itself. A little bird will fall dead, frozen from a bough, without ever having felt sorry for itself.” London’s story of Buck examines the instinctive wild nature of things in all life, whether animal or human. How the call of the wild manifests itself, whether with bald brutality or with measured and necessary violence, has more to do with the underlying innate nature of the one answering the call.Bottom Line: Whether for the sheer adventure or for the underlying examination of the instinctive wildness of life, a pleasing and thought-provoking read.5 bones!!!!!
  • (5/5)
    loved it. I had never read Jack London before.
  • (5/5)
    A gentle, well cared for family dog named Buck is stolen, sold, and shipped to Alaska and turned into a sled dog. It is quickly determined by most who come in contact with him that he is unique. Treated cruelly by most, and kind by few, he eventually finds freedom. A beautifully written story.
  • (4/5)
    A classic. London captures your imagination with an adventure story told through the eyes of a (involuntary) sled-dog. The progression from what equals slavery to eventual freedom provides a unique context. Bucks ability to adapt is interesting, making the best of his situation. His growth through the book can easily parallel anyone moving from their late teens to adulthood. I have issues with London as a person (primarily his bigotry towards the Chinese); however, I can't deny his lasting legacy in adventure writing. This story is timeless...
  • (5/5)
    Jack London’s book was first published in 1903 and this complete and unabridged hardcover reproduction does justice to the story with an attractive cover and illustrations throughout. Buck is a pampered half German shepherd, half saint Bernard dog who is king of his world which entails looking after Judge Miller’s Californian raisin farm. He is kidnapped by a servant and sold to pay gambling debts. This is when his education really begins ‘Again and again, as he looked at each brutal performance, the lesson was driven home to Buck: a man with a club was a lawgiver, a master to be obeyed’ (London, 2002, p. 29). The book is set in the time of the Klondike gold rush and Buck must learn to survive in the Yukon where men will do anything, nothing too low, for gold. ‘He had been suddenly jerked from the heart of civilisation and flung into the heart of things primordial’ (London, 2002, p. 37). The savagery of these working dogs in this harsh country is explored in Bucks witnessing a dog’s horrific death. ‘Two minutes from the time Curly went down, the last of her assailants were clubbed off. But she lay there limp and lifeless in the bloody, trampled snow, almost literally torn to pieces’ (London, 2002, p. 39). This book is riveting, a work of art. Jack London has so honed his craft that he can transport one into the very heart and soul of his character. I was hardly able to put this book down, even though the pure savagery at times had me cringing and close to tears, empathising with Buck and feeling his pain. ‘He is at times savage but ultimately he possesses a dignity, a wisdom, and even a sort of moral code that is so often lacking in the human world’ (Kilpatrick, W., et al., 1994, p. 173). When Buck is drawn to the wolf pack and finds the community he desires, the sense of happiness is overwhelming. This book is a masterpiece and should be read by all.
  • (4/5)
    The call of the wild, a fantastic book which strokes every reader’s vanity and pride, is about a southern dog, Buck who is taken from his farm and sold up north to draw sledges in the Arctic. The story is about his struggles with the new conditions and new masters.The book beautifully describes the transformation of a domesticated dog to wildness. A very powerful book.and a must read.
  • (3/5)
    Had a hard time with the violence of this book. I know it's a classic but it was not a rewarding read for me. I'm sure it was a shock when first published.