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Los Tres Mosqueteros

Los Tres Mosqueteros

Escrito por Alexandre Dumas

Narrado por Carlos Zambrano


Los Tres Mosqueteros

Escrito por Alexandre Dumas

Narrado por Carlos Zambrano

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (63 valoraciones)
Longitud:
2 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2001
ISBN:
9781611552805
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

"Todos para uno y uno para todos". Las aventuras de los tres mosqueteros del rey, Atos, Portos y Aramis y su amigo D'Artagnan, en su busqueda de arreglar el problema del collar de la reina y de su antagonismo contra los guardias del Cardenal Richelieu, son la base de una serie de obras de Dumas, padre, en las cuales el espiritu de aventura se convierte en una serie de acciones emocionantes, que convierte a "Los tres mosqueteros" en una de las novelas de accion mas brillantes en la historia de la literatura. Aunque dicen que los personajes estan basados en gente real, lo cierto es que la imaginacion de Dumas trasciende lo historico para crear una obra apasionante, que es leida por Carlos Zambrano, conocido actor de radio y television.
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2001
ISBN:
9781611552805
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro

Sobre el autor

One of the most famous French writers of the nineteenth century, Alexandre Dumas (1802–1870) first achieved success in the literary world a playwright, before turning his hand to writing novels. In two years from 1844 to 1845, he published two enormous books, The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers. Both novels have sold millions of copies worldwide.


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4.5
63 valoraciones / 49 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    Wonderful historical fiction -- the exciting adventures of four loyal companions who fight to save the Queen of France from the machinations of Cardinal Richelieu. If you have enjoyed any of the Three Musketeer movies, you should try the book -- much more depth and lots of little subplots that add to the enjoyment. Dumas's prose is extremely readable.
  • (5/5)
    I tried reading this when I was younger. I suspect my failure was partly due to lack of interest, and partly due to a bad translator. I've found the Penguin "Read Red" series, so far as I've read them, to be pretty well translated and easy to read. Including this one.

    The Three Musketeers is an unrepentant adventure story, with some politics and romance thrown in. It's exciting to read -- it only took me so long because I got distracted: shame on me -- and fun. It isn't that heavy on characterisation, I suppose. For the most part we don't learn much about the musketeers, only what they are doing at the immediate time. Possibly Milady gets the most character building, since she's so evil and we see so much of her during the last part of the book.

    Not all of it is happy fun adventure, I suppose: there are some bits that drag. Possibly if you found a good abridgement, that'd be worthwhile. But I liked the way it all came together. I'm a little sad that I don't actually own it, and it's going back to the library, but that's easily remedied. Once I'm allowed to buy books again, anyway...
  • (4/5)
    Good fun. I feel after nearly 900 pages I should have something more to say about this, but it's really one of those books where Story and Event is everything and literary quality is secondary. It held my interest the whole way, though, with plenty of dashing cavaliers, heaving bosoms, secret lovers, dastardly plots, coded messages, mistaken identities, and the rest of the ingredients for an early-Romantic pot-boiler. Make no mistake, derring will be done and swashes will be buckled!Our scene is the mid-seventeenth century, as France is trying to repair the wounds of the Wars of Religion, and building up to the famous Siege of La Rochelle, the last stronghold of French Protestantism. King Louis XIII is somewhat estranged from his young, beautiful wife, who is suspected of having an affair with an English nobleman; and behind the king is the original eminence grise, his first minister Cardinal Richelieu, whose network of spies covers all of Europe.Don't expect too much historical accuracy here – Dumas changes dates and invents characters pretty much whenever he feels like it, and the text is so full of historical anachronisms (references to Botany Bay for instance) that I gave up keeping track of them all. Anyway, who cares about historical accuracy when you're having this much fun? Our titular musketeers, as well as wannabe musketeer and hotheaded provincial d'Artagnan, blunder through this world, tangling themselves up in political intrigues, romantic liaisons, and generally causing or resolving international incidents.Their values are not our own. ‘Bad guys’ are killed left and right without a second thought, and d'Artagnan's great love interest is a married woman. His behaviour during the seduction of poor chambermaid Ketty would probably have been described as ‘masterful’ once; nowadays, ‘rapey’ seems like a better word. But these sorts of WTF moments are all part of the fun of this kind of novel.As everyone I think acknowledges, the greatest character in the book, stealing every scene she appears in, is Milady, one of the cardinal's chief agents and a thoroughly bad-ass femme fatale. She has been poorly served by film adaptations – as has the book in general, for that matter. It would make a great TV series. The action is naturally episodic anyway, with two distinct story arcs – the second building to the siege of La Rochelle, and the first centring on the theft of the Queen's ferrets de diamants (which I imagine must have given translators a bit of trouble – I would say ‘diamond aiguillettes’ but I'm curious as to how published English versions render this).If you grew up in the time and place I did, it's impossible to read this without a certain theme tune going through your head—One of all and all for one!Muskahounds are always ready,One for all and all for one!Helping everybody…and honestly, the book was just as much fun for me as a grown-up as Dogtanian was when I was a kid.
  • (3/5)
    I'm glad to have read this classic, but I ended a bit disappointed following Dumas' "The Count of Monte Cristo" which is one of my all time favorites. Typical of the time period, perhaps, this novel tended to be a bit slow in development and overly dramatic, with characters taking personal affront at the slightest indecency and taking matters into their own hands for revenge. A swashbuckling adventure, to be sure and a classic in the world of literature, it nevertheless seemed a bit over the top to me and lacked the subtlety and restraint and latent hostility of Dumas' other work. The ending is clever with an economy of characters but I didn't feel the novel worthy of the 700 pages devoted to the story.
  • (1/5)
    I really wanted to like this book, but didn't, in that I am disappointed. The men in this story are revolting - they use people, bribe people, ridicule people and love to kill people - there was not a lot to like here!
  • (5/5)
    This is truely a great read. The three Musketeers plus d'Artangan, hotheaded, fickle, jovial and ruthless at the same time, but very lovable characters pit themselves against the menacing interfering Cardinal Richelieu and the unparralleled villain of M'lady de Winter as they fight for love & honour amidst some dangerous intrigues of the French Royal court.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorites! Milady is a fascinating character study. She deserves her own story. Yes, the evil, man-destroying succubus was stereotypical even by the time this was written, but Milady is so brilliantly written, I can happily look past that.
  • (4/5)
    Not as good as The Count of Monte Cristo, but Milady de Winter is one of literature's all-time greatest villainesses. Worth reading, but I would recommend Victor Hugo's novels over Dumas's as the pinnacle of French romanticism.
  • (5/5)
    It's not every day I stop while reading a book to say to myself: "Wow. I'm really having a lot of fun." This book and the sequels are a great time.
  • (5/5)
    Full of intrigue, swordplay, and revenge, it is the story of d'Artagnan, a young nobleman who travels to Paris in hopes of joining the Musketeers, a group of swashbuckling adventurers who serve King Louis XIII. His wit and fighting ability make d'Artagnan a welcome addition to their ranks, and together the four young men work to foil the King's evil rival, Cardinal Richelieu.
  • (4/5)
    Immensely enjoyable, and surprisingly readable. I had expected that this might be rather turgid - not in the least. I was surprised, however, at some of the musketeers' activities. Not for them the rigid confines of the preux chevalier code. They are perfectly happy to bilk innkeepers and landlords, and are not above plain theft. However, one never doubts their adherence to the path of general righteousness. There are great moments of high comedy, too, and I am eagerly looking forward to the sequels. One point that amazed me was that this novel was published in the same year as his "Count of Monte Cristo". Both of them are huge novels and u am intrigued to know more if the basic mechanics of how two such large works were written and published in the nineteenth century. I would heartily recommend this entertaining novel.
  • (5/5)
    This is a classic tale of honor, duty and loyalty. The heroes aren't otherworldly characters, but instead are written to be normal individuals with common problems with only their integrity to set them apart. Even if you know the story, this book is very captivating to the end.
  • (5/5)
    Even if you know the story of the musketeers, you must read Richard Pevear's translation. If only he would translate the rest of the saga of D'Artagnan. Highly recommended.
  • (5/5)
    This was one of those classics I elected to listen to on audio and I'm so happy I did. I loved sitting back and being told this story about the one-for-all-and-all-for-one guys. Funny, smart -- one of the better classics I've experienced. Political intrigue, romance, humor, history -- I really enjoyed reading the story. I also rented the movie with Michael York, Richard Chamberlain, Raquel Welch, Oliver Reed, Charleton Heston and Faye Dunaway having vague but fond memories of it. It didn't match up to my memories, but it was still fun to see it again after having read the book.If a classic is on your need-to-read list, pick this one.
  • (5/5)
    After reading “The Three Musketeers” by Alexandre Dumas it’s easy to see why it is considered an enduring literary classic. Mr. Dumas breathes such life into the characters and weaves interesting turns into a vastly satisfying adventure story. What I especially enjoyed was the swift twirl from the vapid happy-go-lucky first half of the novel to the darker vengeful second-half. That much of the novel is viewed through and played out through the musketeer’s newest member, d’Artagnan, adds a level of unexpected enjoyment.
  • (4/5)
    This is a well-known story so I won't bore you with rehashing the tale. I have been trying in the last few years to read Classics that I have on my shelf and never cracked open. This was one that I chose for this year and several other readers joined me in a group read. I have to admit that I thought I knew the story because I had seen the movies (both versions) and I thought they probably didn't range too far from the book but I was wrong. I found as I was reading this over two months that it took me to places that I hadn't seen in either movie and character depths that were unexplored came to life. I'm not someone that normally enjoys the Classics, but this was an exception.
  • (3/5)
    Young D’artagnan and his three Musketeer companions are embroiled in a succession of plots instigated by Cardinal Richeleiu and carried out by the infamous ‘my lady’ or ‘her ladyship’, one of the fiercest and most deceitful female adversaries in literature. I’m glad I finally got around to reading this... overall, the tale makes for an enjoyable, adventuresome romp… not my favourite Dumas, but eminently readable. I found I struggled at first to care about the French politics, but since everything was both necessary to, and interwoven with, the plot, it soon consolidated itself with the rest of the story to become well-paced and dramatic.
  • (4/5)
    Great adventure story! Though I didn't like it as much as The Count of Monte Cristo.
  • (4/5)
    I first read this book as a youngster and enjoyed it although i didn't really follow all of the plot. I just read it again about 60 years later. I loved it. At first it seemed a little juvenile but I quickly fell under its spell.The reviews above have mentioned many of the things I liked, but I would like to add one thing not mentioned heretofore. I just finished reading an excellent long account of the English Civil War, which made me want to read fiction of the period. I was very impressed with the accuracy of Dumas's depiction of events. My newly acquired knowledge of the period greatly increased my enjoyment of Dumas's imagination. There is nothing in the novel that disagrees with the history of that period. Plus he adds all these lovely imaginary details, e.g. the motives of the fanatic who assassinated Buckingham. Great stuff. Milady has to be one of the most fascinating characters in fiction.
  • (5/5)
    This book is the adventures of d'Artagnan and is friends Porthos, Athos, and Aramis. Together the live by the motto "all for one, and one for all" and protect the rulers of France from the evil Cardinal Richelieu.This story has a little bit of everything, action, adventure, romance, comedy, it just a fun read all around.I would use this book in a unit on French literature or in conjunction with a unit on medieval romances as it shares many of the same themes as they have.
  • (5/5)
    I was surprized at how complex and detailed the writting is. Absolutly every thought and movement is stated by the author. And the vocabulary was huge. I was thinking about how many more words people knew one hundred years ago.
  • (5/5)
    Like many people, I had seen movies based on the novel. A few were excellent, most mediocre, and none able to capture the magic of the novel. A book with political intrigue, duels, action, adventure and a love story is hard to match! D'Artagnan is the quintessential hero. He's young, handsome, brash, idealistic and passionately loyal. France is in disarray, thanks to a manipulation of a ruthless cardinal. Can four companions save king and country?This is the kind of book that will get young people to see the value in reading. Though the language is a little old fashioned (it is historical fiction after all) it does not make reading difficult as in some works. Highly recommended!
  • (5/5)
    This is one of the longest books I have read lately. At first it was a little intimidating but when I finally got the courage to start reading it I discovered that it's fast paced and couldn't stop reading. This book is full of action, the events are cleverly interwoven to make a complex plot of friendship, loyalty, romance, adventure and suspense. I found the characters to be all so fascinating, it starts with the great D'Artagnan whose hot hotheadedness accounts for most of the adventures and which leads him to meet with the famous three musketeers, Athos, Porthos and Aramis. Once they are sworn as friends the four men become inseparable and live by their motto "all for one, one for all", they demonstrate loyalty for each other until the end. I recently learned that Alexandre Dumas wrote two more books to follow this one, Twenty Years After and The Vicomte De Bragelonne, the three books are also known as the D'Artagnan Romances. This made me curious to get hold of the next books and find out what happened after The Three Musketeers. With every classic that I read I realize that these books truly deserve to be called classics and why I should really read more of them.
  • (5/5)
    A must-read, at least once. I'm not terribly fond of Dumas' style of writing, but it is a lot more readable than some of his era. The story is a classic & has been rehashed so many times that it is really worth seeing what everyone has begged, borrowed & stolen over the years. I've read it twice & may read it again before I die, but probably only once more.
  • (5/5)
    Well swash my buckle and buckle my swash!Loved the books and the Oliver Reed/Raquel Welsh films. But more than anything loved the way that Dumas took time to concentrate on the Baroness and created the first, real modern villaness.One of those books which completely surprises you.En guard!
  • (5/5)
    Having only been exposed to the Disney and Dogtanian version of this story, I thought I would undertake to read the real thing. And wow, I wasn't disappointed! According to the introduction, Dumas wrote this book serialised daily, which is quite some feat! It also means that each chapter ends on a cliff-hanger or something else that draws you in to keep reading. Its an exciting, thrilling tale of daring and adventure. Last night I had to stay up late to finish it, despite the fact that I was really tired, as the book progressed towards its inevitably tragic and dramatic climax.Admittedly, the main characters are hardly sympathetic. The musketeers and D'artagnan are all hard-drinking and loose with their money, sponging off their friends and treating their servants with contempt. Their relationships with women are quite cavalier too. The most sympathetic one is Athos, whose past comes back to haunt him and who increasingly occupies a greater role in the story towards the end as he seeks his revenge.Of the baddies, I was a bit disappointed with the cardinal, as he seemed to me to be rather an insipid character, torn between his admiration for the daring feats of the musketeers and his dislike for the fact that they keep undermining his dastardly plots. The best character is definitely Milady, a cold and calculated actress who can twist people round her little finger to do what she wants. Yet even she seems scared of losing the cardinal's favour.This is a brilliantly multi-layered book which, due to the plot full of political machinations, intrigues and secrets, is, at its heart, a damn good read.
  • (3/5)
    Here's a book that has infiltrated popular culture to a certain extent for over 150 years. I've seen derivative movies, ridden themed amusement rides, shouted 'All for one...!' during heated moments. But I'd never read the book itself.Sure, I can check it off of my 'well read' list now. But the experience, though entertaining for the most part, left me wondering exactly what the big deal is about this novel.I'm going to warrant a guess that it was genre-shaping, and its outright irreverence was probably a kick in the pants to its 19th century audience. Dumas' treatment of illicit affairs is not subtle, and there is raunchy humor sprinkled liberally throughout.This is a boy's novel, thoroughly. Though the main antagonist is a crafty female, the real depth of character is saved for the four heroes (d'Artagnan, Porthos, Athos, Aramis). And it would be an overstatement to call this swashbuckling adventure a character study, anyway.The action is pretty constant, although occasionally formulaic (and thus predictable). Dumas uses patterns that sound poetic or mythic sometimes: a certain adventure befalls each of the four protagonists in rhythmic succession, for example. Something I learned, as an aside: Dumas wrote in tandem with a history teacher, Auguste Maquet, who served as his researcher and did a good amount of the outlining and a bit of the writing.
  • (5/5)
    Built on the ridiculous, the humorous, the exciting, and deeply in the characters, this work creates a world of romance (in that oh-so-classic sense) and adventure which conscripts the reader and delivers him to the front lines. I am alway amazed by this book's ability to invoke lust, pity, wonder, respect, scorn, and hatred, all while driving along a plot filled with new events and characters.Should there be any future for Fantasy, it lies not in the hands of Tolkien-copying machines, nor even in Moorecock's 'un-fantasy', but in whatever writer can capture Beowulf, The Aeneid, The Three Musketeers, or The White Company and make a world which is exciting not because everything is magical and strange, but because everything is entirely recognizable, but much stranger. Of course, one may want to avoid going Mervyn Peake's route with this, and take a lesson from the driving plot and carefree frivolity that Dumas Pere and his innumerable ghostwriters adhered to.It is amusing here to note that Dumas has accredited to his name far more books than he is likely to have ever written. As he was paid for each book with his name on it, he made a sort of 'writing shop' where he would dictate plots, characters, or sometimes just titles to a series of hired writers and let them fill in the details.So, praises be to Dumas or whichever of his unrecognized hirees wrote such a work.
  • (5/5)
    1198. The Three Musketeers, by Alexandre Dumas (read 19 Nov 1972) I got the same thrill from reading this book as I used to get from the Rover Boys and from Mary T. Waggaman books. I really enjoyed it. It tells the story of D'Artagan, from April 1625, when he leaves his father's house for Paris, till Sept. 1628. He meets the three musketeers--Porthos, Aramis, and Athos--and has many adventures. The villain--Milady--is a fantastic creation who is credited with instigating John Felton's assassination of the duke of Buckingham on Aug. 23, 1628, at Portsmouth, as well as a host of fictional crimes. The seige of La Rochelle occupies--as a backdrop--the latter part of the book, tho the heroes spend most of their time gallivanting around elsewhere. Old-fashioned but delightful melodrama.
  • (3/5)
    I liked it until the end.